Sign in to follow this  
Steve Rinaldo

Maxwell 2 Cyl. Engine, Part 2

Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, mercer09 said:

they did have great metallurgy at the time

 

That could be argued in the case of the Titanic sinking in 1912. The Roeblings might not have agreed.......................

The bridge is still  standing and most MERCERS are still racing & touring. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wasnt referring to that- it is speculated that the metal on the Titanic wasnt heated properly and shattered like glass, upon impact.....................

 

by the way, most Mercers are extinct. there are only about 140 left in pieces etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As I said earlier, the guys rebuilding this engine are two of the best in the hobby. So I think I'll wait for a replacement crankcase. I would like to thank everyone for their responses as this has been most interesting to me. Steve

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/12/2020 at 4:20 PM, mike6024 said:

Instead of casting a new block, might it be possible to do it by machining; like machine two halves and bolt them together, or put them together with a spacer between?

As mentioned earlier, when my Great Grandparents had the Miller race car made they insisted on a machined bronze crankase and the parts were then fused together (also probably technology that really is not with us a today) - my grandfather use to have photos of the block in the furnace. By the way, they engine I think blew up in 1946, with Duke Dinsmore driving - I think it ran under branding of Vulcan Tool Special 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/12/2020 at 12:59 PM, mercer09 said:

really not worth the time and cost to recast a block. At least not for a 2 cyl Maxwell.

 

Tom Rasmussen at Odyessy restorations http://www.odysseyrestorations.com/ recast Franklin Model D crankcases and that worked out fine - maybe worth asking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Steve,

in regards to casting a new crankcase. It of course can be done and there are foundries that will cast it.

 

as to cost. That all depends on how much of the work you have to pay someone else versus doing it yourself. It’s not rocket science but just takes thought, research, and a willingness to make mistakes. And... well time.
 

being a crankcase (though without photos it’s hard to tell) the pattern work should be fairly straight forward. However, there is a considerable amount of time in reverse engineering. (Measurements, documentation etc) Before the patterns can be fabricated.  For machining the finished castings, fits and tolerances have to be calculated and shop drawings developed. In hindsight the casting and machine time is the cheap part.

 

is it doable? Yup! Just depends on how much you can do yourself versus paying someone to do it for you. 
 

I actually love this type of work. Reverse engineering a part such as this is like opening a portal to the past it’s really amazing to discover the “why” and “how” and indeed what we have lost to modern technology. Its not that modern technology is less capable but its like a car or piece of machinery from the 1900's -1920's which involved a 

large percentage of human element in its fabrication and assembly simple has soul. It reminds me of a visit I had years ago to a manufacturer of canoes.

In the basement they had craftsman building traditional wood and canvas canoes using tools handed down generations. I could have 

watched for hours!. Meanwhile in another part of the facility they were dumping buckets of plastic pellets into a rotomolding machine which was

cranking out plastic kayaks by the dozens. In contrast those plastic kayaks were, cold and simply lifeless. 
 

 

Edited by Terry Harper (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 In contrast those plastic kayaks were, cold and simply lifeless. 
 

but probably keeping the business alive through profit- vs handmade canoes.........lol!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, mercer09 said:

 In contrast those plastic kayaks were, cold and simply lifeless. 
 

but probably keeping the business alive through profit- vs handmade canoes.........lol!

 

Very true!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/16/2020 at 10:43 PM, Terry Harper said:

Hello Steve,

in regards to casting a new crankcase. It of course can be done and there are foundries that will cast it.

 

as to cost. That all depends on how much of the work you have to pay someone else versus doing it yourself. It’s not rocket science but just takes thought, research, and a willingness to make mistakes. And... well time.
 

being a crankcase (though without photos it’s hard to tell) the pattern work should be fairly straight forward. However, there is a considerable amount of time in reverse engineering. (Measurements, documentation etc) Before the patterns can be fabricated.  For machining the finished castings, fits and tolerances have to be calculated and shop drawings developed. In hindsight the casting and machine time is the cheap part.

 

is it doable? Yup! Just depends on how much you can do yourself versus paying someone to do it for you. 
 

I actually love this type of work. Reverse engineering a part such as this is like opening a portal to the past it’s really amazing to discover the “why” and “how” and indeed what we have lost to modern technology. Its not that modern technology is less capable but its like a car or piece of machinery from the 1900's -1920's which involved a 

large percentage of human element in its fabrication and assembly simple has soul. It reminds me of a visit I had years ago to a manufacturer of canoes.

In the basement they had craftsman building traditional wood and canvas canoes using tools handed down generations. I could have 

watched for hours!. Meanwhile in another part of the facility they were dumping buckets of plastic pellets into a rotomolding machine which was

cranking out plastic kayaks by the dozens. In contrast those plastic kayaks were, cold and simply lifeless. 
 

 

My opinion,  my rule of thumb, and historically is that if I have the problem with my car there are a whole lot of other people with the same problem - so we make parts.  I was very fortunate with the Auburn's that other people beat me to the punch in making parts - it has been nice, but do not be surprised if you find me making parts again (even for Auburn's).  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this