George Smolinski

Cadillac V-16 Collection

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13 minutes ago, edinmass said:

All Cadillacs from 1903 to 1935 are a handful. 12 & 16 even more so. I never recommend a Cadillac for a first old car, unless it’s a 1941 or similar unit where parts and service are as easy as a Ford T Bird. Basically, Cadillac’s always need some service and attention. They puke gas, dump oil, and have a bunch of bad habits that are difficult to deal with if you don’t have some mechanical talent AND the right “head” to deal with them. It’s very easy to get discouraged when working on them. I rather keep three  Model J’s going down the road than one V-16. My first old car was a 1931 Sport Coupe at 14 years old..........the dam thing made me pull my hair out. I went on to owning a bunch of them. Then I drove a Pierce Arrow.........and started selling ALL my Caddy’s..........and buying Pierce cars. I enjoy the two V-16’s I maintain in the collection.........took one to breakfast yesterday............60 mike round trip and no problems. Now that the two are dialed in, I don’t carry any tools.......so you can get them into a sweet spot. Owning one from this era means you WILL be working on it if you drive it. In my opinion the 30-31 cars are harder to own than the later ones, but I consider all the V-16 cars(overhead)  identical in driving characteristics. Properly dialed in I agree with AJ’s comments on the Model J / Caddy driving comments. 

 

Now that you have contributed something useful about prewar caddy,  can you please go over to the Rolls thread and compare and contrast the Springfield PI with the LHD PII

 

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19 hours ago, A. Ballard 35R said:

The Packard Fact book for 840 and 845 cars does not list a sport phaeton, only a phaeton. The crude cowl support is totally unlike what was on the 645 dual cowl sport phaeton. Odds are very strong that this car did not leave the factory as it presently exists. Or, as Ed mentioned, it would have sold for a lot more.

 

CORRECTION: Upon closer reading of the 840/845 Packard Fact/Data booklet, I discovered the following items:

- The "Sport Phaeton Body is mounted on the 840 chassis" and has "a hinged tonneau cowl including a rear single piece folding windshield".

- "At each side of the back of the front seat there is a light" and also a large compartment on the back of the front seat.

- There is a two position carpet covered foot rail. every

 

Sorry for the misinformation - learn something everday.

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I heard at Auction the 1931 Packard 840 had antifreeze in the oil - not an uncommon issue though as I know of plenty 7th-8th series cars that have had head repair (I saw a 640 that looked almost like it broke clean in half and was repaired - frightening).  All it take is a minor imperfection and .... Obviously, water in the oil would scare off anything but the most adventurous of buyers. And matched to green, wrong venue, not prepared for auction, and ....  All said though, also heard it's real dual cowl, so worth the effort. 

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I heard at Auction the 1931 Packard 840 had antifreeze in the oil

 

not a bad ploy- if you want to buy a car on the cheap at auction- bring your own water!  LOL

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The original 30 blue car hammered at 65k which was a smoking deal, the phaeton got 1 large which has been going rate for real cars last few years.   Others in between but trending on the lite side of things.

 

Both prices sans vig.

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The thing you need to factor in to the caddy prices is that every car in the Groendyke  collection has been sorted to the extreme.  So anybody that bought one of these cars can hop in it and drive 500 miles.  

 

With that in mind,  the all 4 of the 31-36 cars were really good deals.    The 32 was a very nice car in ever aspect,  and 195k hammer is a free car with about 40% discount on the restoration.    I know convertible sedans are a tough sell generally,  but the 35 has great presence, super long hood,  nice nice condition and a new motor (replacement block).  That feels like a deal too at 425K hammer,  and something like 200k short of the last public sale for that car.

 

The 36 town sedan has a super high speed rear end and I can't think of a better tour car.  I think a SMOKING deal at 167,500 hammer.  Really attractive,  very nice condition,  great color.

IMG_6475.jpg

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Do you also have such good pics of the other cars ? If so, please post.   -   Carl 

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10 minutes ago, C Carl said:

Do you also have such good pics of the other cars ? If so, please post.   -   Carl 

 

No.   Sorry.

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Do you also have such good pics of the other cars ? If so, please post.   -   Carl 

Which car ?

 

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That '36 town sedan really is a great-looking car. I don't think I've ever seen a V16 sedan that was a non-limousine. If you're going to have a closed car, that is the right one to own, that's for sure.

 

I also really like the looks of the yellow convertible sedan. That hood looks about 8 feet long! Fantastic cars.

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1 hour ago, 1950panhead said:

 

 

Which car ?

 

 

Well, I am particularly fond of original cars. The blue '30 would have been the one I would have driven home.  -   Cadillac Carl 

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On 1/13/2020 at 12:21 PM, alsancle said:

 

Now that you have contributed something useful about prewar caddy,  can you please go over to the Rolls thread and compare and contrast the Springfield PI with the LHD PII

 

I have rarely touched a PII mechanically, perhaps as Cincinnati was a BIG PI area of the Country (possibly due to for years there was one of the better RR restoration shops in Country here or perhaps this area just at one time being dense in pre-war cars generally), though my opinion is pretty much that a PI and a PII have equal quirks in difficulty to maintain, aluminum cylinder hears, and ... - perhaps the key difference is for whatever reason (ex. gearing ?) a PII is a much more highway roadworthy car and a PII Continental is even better for "speed."  

 

I will say an English PI has better gearing via a 4th gear than an American PI via 3 speed. 

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On 1/17/2020 at 11:14 AM, alsancle said:

 I know convertible sedans are a tough sell generally, 

Most people will never know joy of a Convertible Sedan as there are not too many around in any make or any year, but they are fabulous to pile all your friends in for dinner (choice of top up or down), rather glamours cars, you can go to any Concours event with a well restored one, and ... - after the first convertible sedan we have had 6 + more over time and there is no going back.  

 

As to V-16's: The only thing I did not like about the 34 V-16 was that parts for it (other than the engine itself) were near unobtainium  - a thank you goes to Brian Joseph at Classic and Exotic (now Straight Eight) for all the help over years (and 30 and 31's are much easier parts wise, but 30/31 Vacuum tank fuel supply is a pain). 

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On 1/17/2020 at 8:32 AM, alsancle said:

The original 30 blue car hammered at 65k which was a smoking deal,

A Free car !

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41 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

I have rarely touched a PII mechanically, perhaps as Cincinnati was a BIG PI area of the Country (possibly due to for years there was one of the better RR restoration shops in Country here or perhaps this area just at one time being dense in pre-war cars generally), though my opinion is pretty much that a PI and a PII have equal quirks in difficulty to maintain, aluminum cylinder hears, and ... - perhaps the key difference is for whatever reason (ex. gearing ?) a PII is a much more highway roadworthy car and a PII Continental is even better for "speed."  

 

I will say an English PI has better gearing via a 4th gear than an American PI via 3 speed. 


Eddy has some very definite opinions on the I vs II which I’m hoping he will write down for us over in the Rolls thread.

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