George Smolinski

Cadillac V-16 Collection

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9 minutes ago, trimacar said:

 A LOT of times, I’ve politely told people to leave, that the car wasn’t what they wanted so no use discussing further.

Yep, been there done that. 

 

Anymore, when people start to use the negatives as a negotiation factor, I have been sending them packing more and more.

 

By the way, I helped friends buy a 1960's Citroen this week - they have never owned a collector car before, but they are incredibly personable couple matched to a great group of friends, looking at this as an adventure - "Oh, The Places You'll Go",  realistic that it will need plenty of service, and .... 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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7 hours ago, mercer09 said:

curious eric, as to what other venues you have used to sell your T?

 

the aaca is a tough sell site.

 

I have not seen it on the Barn. Is it in Hemmings?

I have used Hemmings, PreWar Car, HCCA, Model T Ford Club International. Model T Ford Club of America and Craigslist . To be honest,  I forgot all about the Ford Barn. Maybe I will try them. Thanks for the idea. I probably should try Facebook too.

Edited by ericmac (see edit history)

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2 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

Every time I look at a Cord you should hear the complaining that dad does - painful.  Interestingly, he also says if anyone can handle it would be me. 

 

John,   a 810/812 is a GREAT car and you would have no problem sorting one out given you have wrestled with a P1 and won.    There are lots of upgrades and tech bulletins to fix original engineering flaws,   and I can tell you my dad drove his from Boston to Auburn twice with zero issues.   The first time in 1968,  he left the day after finishing the restoration and driving it 2 miles for testing.    A blown car MOVES.   I love them.

 

 

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I’m curious.  I bought my first old car at age nine from a Cord enthusiast (he bought some Cord parts and had an old 30’s Dodge and Model A pickup parts as part of a package deal).  Anyway, he drove a supercharged 810 extensively (well sorted - particularly shifting, as compared to others at the time).  He used to say the only difference between a Cord with a super charger and one without below 60mph was that the super charged car stopped at a gas station about twice as much.  I always wondered how much of that was just story.  He also had a story about a guy who was telling his girl friend how obviously fake the external pipes were and proceeded to “prove it”  (he’d recently arrived at a non make specific car show in back in the 70’s, so they were rather toasty), but I digress...

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12 minutes ago, George Smolinski said:

I think this thread has been hijacked X2.

Yes, my apologies.

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4 hours ago, George Smolinski said:

I think this thread has been hijacked X2.

 

4 hours ago, SparkEE said:

Yes, my apologies.

 

Aw hey now SparkEE, don't pay it no mind. It's too late for apologies anyway. In order to clear your name, you have already been sentenced to having to tell us more about your first car. Nine years old ? Were you able to get to drive it ? Here : I'll contribute to the drift. Lookie, speaking of Cadillacs, when my kid was but 7, I bought him one. No, it only had half the cylinders of the subject cars, and not "Antique" at the time, much less "Classic", it was a '73. But he did cruise it. Night time was the right time. He would sit on my lap and take advantage of the light traffic density. Not to mention the reduced visibility gave some cover from prying eyes. With the adjustable steering wheel and all the possibilitys of the power seat, we could make it work. Kid could parallel park the barge as well as anyone, too.

 

O.K., your turn, SparkEE. And don't worry. I mean we all have to talk about something while we nervously fidget and wait for RM Sotheby coming up in a few days. We can and will get back to topic when the time comes. 

 

                     Your turn, Spark'. And make it good !     Never had a car until I was 15. And it didn't run.    -    CC 

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Ok, remember, you asked...

 

I grew up in an old car family.  The first time I “drove” was around five when my father needed to move a combine, so he put the truck in gear and hopped out - told me to turn the key off when I got to the edge of the field - I couldn’t reach the pedals and could only see through the gap in between the the top of the dash and the top of the steering wheel.  So by nine, I thought I ought to have my own car.  I fell in love with a ‘39 Dodge that got trailered back from the “big Cord parts deal”  and made a stop off at the farm.  I was informed it could be mine for every dime I’d saved up from working summers to pay for college.  The car needed a total restoration (it had been run for a short distance without oil and one bearing shell - apparently there was a miscommunication between the fellow working on it and the kids returning from school) and the friend of the family who owned it had it up for sale.  When I offered him my savings (pre approved by my parents) he accepted.  Apparently he had to tell the tire kickers that were trying to get it for a cheaper price (free or nearly) that he’d already sold it to a nine year old.  I understand he really enjoyed that.  I learned to rebuild engines by rebuilding that one (with help) - $217 in new parts and machining which added significantly to my total investment, but we had most of the equipment (except getting the crank turned).  Sadly, that is where the love affair ended.  By then I had a beautiful 1932 Plymouth, which has remained one of my most favorite cars.  ...the Dodge will be a project, perhaps for my youngest son. 

 

I now return the thread to its intended purpose ...or whatever direction it takes.

Edited by SparkEE (see edit history)

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11 hours ago, SparkEE said:

Yes, my apologies.

 

I wouldn't worry about it too much.  With apologies to George in advance,  threads where someone is trying to sell something or ask a specific question require more forum etiquette.  But any thread that generates interesting conversation is a good thing around here, even if it goes off target.

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I think this thread has been hijacked X2.

 

 

maybe x 10

 

Im as much a culprit and sorry about that George

 

wasnt at all intentional..

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19 hours ago, SparkEE said:

I’m curious.  I bought my first old car at age nine from a Cord enthusiast (he bought some Cord parts and had an old 30’s Dodge and Model A pickup parts as part of a package deal).  Anyway, he drove a supercharged 810 extensively (well sorted - particularly shifting, as compared to others at the time).  He used to say the only difference between a Cord with a super charger and one without below 60mph was that the super charged car stopped at a gas station about twice as much.  I always wondered how much of that was just story.  He also had a story about a guy who was telling his girl friend how obviously fake the external pipes were and proceeded to “prove it”  (he’d recently arrived at a non make specific car show in back in the 70’s, so they were rather toasty), but I digress...

My opinion on the Cord is the same as the Auburn, but I have spent my time clearly with Auburns - the Supercharger is a near wash as for the power you add you also add drag, but at higher power ranges you get a BOOST.   The only disadvantage to a Auburn (same as Cord) supercharger is that they tried to pre-heat the fuel through them with water and as a result the castings are often bad via water corrosion matched to it is a lot of fast spinning stuff so you have wear - restoration and replacement of the parts are pretty pricey.  That said, you are also usually rewarded on the sale price to justify the restoration costs. 

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To get back on track thread wise (always room for some additional frolic and detour though) - a V-16 Cadillac is a magnificent car, but as to drive-ability the 30 an 31 cars are best as to parts and fairly user friendly - the only think I never liked was the fuel delivery via vacuum tank.  The post 1932 cars pretty much use the same engine (with a mechanical fuel pump - advantage), but the parts supply quickly diminishes for everything else drive-train, plus cosmetics.  Then, you get to the Flathead cars in 1938 - 1940 =  lovely cars, but parts supply all the way around is pretty scarce. 

 

I had a friend on the phone yesterday and we were taking V-16 for a minute - my reply was with the 1934, that I could call Brian Joseph as Classic and Exotic (now owned by Tim and called Straight Eight) and one way or another have the car back on the road usually within a week time (longest was two weeks) - sometimes, I was back on road in a day or two. 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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I drove a 37 Convertible Sedan quite extensively a few years back. I found the car very powerful but the steering was heavy to a point of being painful.  I have driven a 30 roadster but only briefly but found it much better from a handling perspective.  Maybe it was related to the 30simply being a better sorted car.

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2 hours ago, alsancle said:

I wouldn't worry about it too much.  With apologies to George in advance,  threads where someone is trying to sell something or ask a specific question require more forum etiquette.  But any thread that generates interesting conversation is a good thing around here, even if it goes off target.

 

1 hour ago, mercer09 said:

I think this thread has been hijacked X2.

 

 

maybe x 10

 

Im as much a culprit and sorry about that George

 

wasnt at all intentional..

Hey, don't apologize & don't worry about it. I merely made an observation. I'm fully aware of threads going off on a tangent. With this particular one, I thought there would have been more about the cars from people who knew them or the owner.

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1 hour ago, George Smolinski said:

 

Hey, don't apologize & don't worry about it. I merely made an observation. I'm fully aware of threads going off on a tangent. With this particular one, I thought there would have been more about the cars from people who knew them or the owner.

Yes, surprising people have not spoken more about the history of these  V-16 Cadillac's .  

 

I spoke with a VERY KNOWLEDGEABLE fellow yesterday and he said: Yes, the Mecum sold 1931 Packard is as document a factory Dual Cowl as they come - just was a lot of green and clearly had gone down hill post its initial restoration. And, said if he in his wildest dreams though it would have sold for anywhere that price he would have registered as a bidder and owned it today.  And if I had thought it would go for that price, then I would have owned it today too. 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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Well, yes, John. But if a good number of people suspected the deal that was, they would all have pushed the sale price way up. How far would 6 or 8 bottom feeders have gone, looking for a bargain at under 100 grand ?

 

Oh, by the way, I heartily second your testimonial for C&E.     -    Carl 

 

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I haven’t seen that Packard, but somewhere else, it was called out as modern coachwork..........I have no idea, but the price would make me think so.

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1 hour ago, edinmass said:

I haven’t seen that Packard, but somewhere else, it was called out as modern coachwork..........I have no idea, but the price would make me think so.

RE 1931 Packard: I was told yesterday by a fellow I would say very reputable that it was original coachwork and originally also a Dual Cowl on a decent enough car prior to restoration, but it had really gone downhill in condition since restored. 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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The Packard Fact book for 840 and 845 cars does not list a sport phaeton, only a phaeton. The crude cowl support is totally unlike what was on the 645 dual cowl sport phaeton. Odds are very strong that this car did not leave the factory as it presently exists. Or, as Ed mentioned, it would have sold for a lot more.

Edited by A. Ballard 35R
Clarification (see edit history)

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wile i was in Spain recently i came across this retro magazine that talk about Franco's Hispano Suiza.

another interesting car..! and more interesting story on how nobody realized about the importance of this monster.... and is here in the USA now.

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Well, hopefully I am not off topic. I do own a couple of 32 v-16s. I have driven one of them on a number of Classic Car Carvans 

one of at least 4,000 miles. The 32 is a very different car from the 30/31's which are much more truck like in driving and riding.

The 32's and 33's are a pleasure to drive, even long distances or at prolonged freeway speeds.  I don't have personal experience

with the later cars. A lot of the v-16 engine parts interchange for multiple years. Because the v-8's and v-12's often used the exact same

bodies many other parts are also available for these cars.  It is this very interchangeability that warrants caution. Many v-16's that 

began life as a sedan have been converted to open cars with bodies from the lesser cars. Fortunately Cadillac will provide copies of

original build sheets on any v-16, allowing us to determine what the car really is, or was.

 

Johnny

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Got to spend an hour or so driving a very nice 30 Roadster around in 25 degree weather a few years ago.  It was enjoyable and it started, stopped and shifted with  ease.  Good power,   cruised at 55 comfortably.   I think it is easier to drive than a Model J,  but doesn't have the oomph.

 

I know that sorting one correctly is not trivial.   Ed maintains a couple of them and can speak with more authority than I can.

 

Only thing that was odd to me was the hood felt shorter driving the car than when you are standing there looking at it.

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All Cadillacs from 1903 to 1935 are a handful. 12 & 16 even more so. I never recommend a Cadillac for a first old car, unless it’s a 1941 or similar unit where parts and service are as easy as a Ford T Bird. Basically, Cadillac’s always need some service and attention. They puke gas, dump oil, and have a bunch of bad habits that are difficult to deal with if you don’t have some mechanical talent AND the right “head” to deal with them. It’s very easy to get discouraged when working on them. I rather keep three  Model J’s going down the road than one V-16. My first old car was a 1931 Sport Coupe at 14 years old..........the dam thing made me pull my hair out. I went on to owning a bunch of them. Then I drove a Pierce Arrow.........and started selling ALL my Caddy’s..........and buying Pierce cars. I enjoy the two V-16’s I maintain in the collection.........took one to breakfast yesterday............60 mike round trip and no problems. Now that the two are dialed in, I don’t carry any tools.......so you can get them into a sweet spot. Owning one from this era means you WILL be working on it if you drive it. In my opinion the 30-31 cars are harder to own than the later ones, but I consider all the V-16 cars(overhead)  identical in driving characteristics. Properly dialed in I agree with AJ’s comments on the Model J / Caddy driving comments. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)

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1 minute ago, edinmass said:

All Cadillacs from 1903 to 1935 are a handful. 12 & 16 even more so. I never recommend a Cadillac for a first old car, unless it’s a 1941 or similar unit where parts and service are as easy as a Ford T Bird. Basically, Cadillac’s always need some service and attention. They puke gas, dump oil, and have a bunch of bad habits that are difficult to deal with if you don’t have some mechanical talent AND the right “head” to deal with them. It’s very easy to get discouraged when working on them. I rather keep three  Model J’s going down the road than one V-16. My first old car was a 1931 Sport Coupe at 14 years old..........the dam thing made me pull my hair out. I went on to owning a bunch of them. Then I drove a Pierce Arrow.........and started selling ALL my Caddy’s..........and buying Pierce cars. I enjoy the two V-16’s I maintain in the collection.........took one to breakfast yesterday............60 mile round trip and no problems. Now that the two are dialed in, I don’t carry any tools.......so you can get them into a sweet spot. Owning one from this era means you WILL be working on it if you drive it. In my opinion the 30-31 cars are harder to own than the later ones, but I consider all the V-16 cars(overhead)  identical in driving characteristics. Properly dialed in I agree with AJ’s comments on the Model J / Caddy driving comments. 

 

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