Mark Kikta

1922 steering wheel spark/throttle advance levers question?

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Does anyone have any photos of the the Sector spark and advance lever setup on 1916-1923 6-cyl Buicks?

 

While taking them apart to get the aluminum pieces polished, a couple of springs and friction shoes shot out of the sector spark lever(I Think) and I'm not 100% sure how they all go back together.

The parts I need help with are the two friction shoes, two springs and electric horn washer.

 

Hopefully someone has some pictures.

 

Thanks,

Mark

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I experienced the "shooting shoes" too. I ended up just copying the shoe and spring from the other lever.

No photos though.

 

The shoes are "T" shaped and the width is the same as the diameter of the spring hole as a slip fit. The top of the "T" is about 3/8" long if I remember right. I made it out of phenolic.

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I seem to remember the spring fit into a hole. Take a pic of the parts and I'm sure I'll remember more if I can see them. I had that all apart a few times.

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This is what it looks like for 1925.  Not sure how relevant to your model.  Each lever has a spring and shoe that provides friction.       Hugh

IMG_6029.thumb.JPG.5d2ac367e867d0581d919153a00b1a8b.JPG

IMG_7576.thumb.JPG.afe269eca35025205b75172fb2e57fc6.JPG

 

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Morgan,

 

Here are the parts that I need to figure out where they go.

 

Mark

!cid_a6f1fdce-7e18-458d-bfc8-49c295a66c41@namprd10_prod_outlook.jpg

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They look like mine. I'll take pics tomorrow of how they go when I get back out there. Right now I'm waiting for the James/Brad/Ken showdown on Jeopardy.

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Posted (edited)

I found this pic in one of my videos. They look a little different than yours but the idea is the same. One has a concave edge that goes along the outside of the sector, the other is convex and goes on the inside. The spring fits down the hole inside the spark or throttle levers, and into the spring housing in the friction units.

.

.

 

Screenshot (85).png

Edited by Morgan Wright (see edit history)

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Mark. 

Pics of the spark and throttle levers,  showing the holes the springs  go into.  As Morgan said the friction pad then attaches to the spring and rubs against the arc sector.

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Awesome, Thanks to you both.  I thought they popped out of the center somehow.  What a relief, thanks a lot.

 

Mark

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I spoke with Mark a little while ago about the spark and throttle levers.  I told him that I seem to remember my Dad saying something about these rub blocks being made out of Soapstone.  Can anybody comment on that?  To me that seems like a logical material to use in this area.  Mark thought that they could be made out of Bakelite.  If they are indeed Soapstone, that would lend a little bit of lubricity to the mating surfaces.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Terry, 

   This is a drawing I made of the shoes that came out of my 1925-25.  These were Micarta.    Hugh

2114945054_steeringsparkandthrottlefrictionshoesnippet.thumb.JPG.2099951f0d1e88a733f18e54ec2f2b20.JPG

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3 hours ago, Terry Wiegand said:

I spoke with Mark a little while ago about the spark and throttle levers.  I told him that I seem to remember my Dad saying something about these rub blocks being made out of Soapstone.  Can anybody comment on that?  To me that seems like a logical material to use in this area.  Mark thought that they could be made out of Bakelite.  If they are indeed Soapstone, that would lend a little bit of lubricity to the mating surfaces.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

 

Do you want lubricity on the friction pads, or do you want friction? 

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Sorry I didn't mean to be sarcastic in that last post.

 

I checked out my friction pads today and they are steel. To be sure, I scraped off some filings and they were magnetic.

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Posted (edited)

Aw cripe - mine are frosted glass. In most photos they don’t look like it because you see through to dim background colors, but in this screen-grab from a video I shot you can plainly see the flesh of my pinky finger showing through the spark lever one. (Spent a LOT of time going through pictures and videos looking for one showing the transparency too.)

Someone almost certainly stuck these in to replace something lost. Doubt Buick ever used glass even on the little 4-cyls.

Of course the parts-book gives no material description and illustrates only a black blur with the rough shape of the things.

Maybe the car isn’t 100% correct after all.

9CDD3DE7-6E2E-4489-9500-7A67DD6FECC9.jpeg

Edited by Ben P. (see edit history)

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Fundamentally it is a brake. So I'd think a phenolic or bakelite would be most likely material

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42 minutes ago, DonMicheletti said:

Fundamentally it is a brake. So I'd think a phenolic or bakelite would be most likely material

 

Mine are steel.

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I'd think that steel against that pot metal of the quadrant was a poor combination.  The expensive part wears out.

 

Of the 3 that I have taken apart, none were steel.

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Yes mine are some non magnetic material that feels like bakelite or something.

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4 hours ago, DonMicheletti said:

I'd think that steel against that pot metal of the quadrant was a poor combination.  The expensive part wears out.

 

Of the 3 that I have taken apart, none were steel.

 

OK I went back and tested again, and it's not steel. The file I used was very fine and made dust particles which were so small they stuck to the magnet via static electricity. Today I used a rougher file and made bigger filings, which DO NOT stick to the magnet. It's a metal though, not bakelite. It might be pot metal. Here are some pics:

 

 

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Today while waiting to get my throttle sector back from being polished,  I decided to pull the shafts for them out from the steering column to clean and grease.  Seemed like the old grease was a graphite grease so that’s what I put back in.  I cleaned both shafts with brake clean and re-greased them with synthetic graphite grease. I used a steel rod with paper towels taped to it to grease the inside parts.

 

I also took this time to strip the steering wheel so I can re-stain it.  That’s is some tuff stuff to take off whatever it is that’s on that wheel. I stripped it five times and all that is left are some black spots that are impossible to remove

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The original grease was probably graphite powder mixed with vaseline, that was extremely common to use in those days. People who restore old Victrolas still use it to grease the drive spring in the can. It's just common knowledge and traditional among Victrola restorers, because it's what Thomas Edison used on everything.

 

http://victrolagramophones.proboards.com/thread/1200/columbia-grafonola-advice-needed

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Here is a new old stock steering wheel on my car, to get an idea of what the finished product should look like.

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DSCN3320.JPG

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Here are a couple photos I took today of my steering wheel today.  I painted the spokes with a single stage acrylic enamel with a hardener.

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