Morgan Wright

1917 vs. 1918 E-49 can you identify them by grease cups?

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Posted (edited)

Does anybody have grease cups like these, and if so, what year is your car? There are 2 types, one just a cup and one with a thumb twister thingy on it.

 

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Edited by Morgan Wright (see edit history)

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

Interesting question.

My E-35 4 cyl. has both types as well. Went through the entire parts-book out of curiosity - saw just two types listed: No. 000 which has the thumb tab thing; and No. 00 which is just the cup.

I do not know if this car has a high or low serial number. 

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Similar to a Lunkenheimer T style or is it a screw down feed thingy....?

 

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Posted (edited)

I believe that the first one is either an aftermarket or/replacement from another car for a lost grease cup on a Buick. 

 

The second style is the only type that I have seen on any of my cars and I have several and looked at many more of that vintage. 

 

I do have some of the first type that I have purchased when I purchased a box of them a few years ago.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)

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The first one with the tab on top is listed and pictured in the parts-book for the 1918 4-cyl models as No. 000 - part number: 1523.

4 of them were used on the steering knuckles, 4 more on the front spring shackles and various other places. They match what is on my car.

 

(I lent out my original parts-book, so the picture below is from a poor xerox copy. BTW, these parts-books are a major PITA. They very carefully illustrate each part only once - but there is NO rhyme or reason as to WHERE they chose to illustrate it. Rarely does the illustration appear with the first listing of a multiple use part.)

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Posted (edited)
16 hours ago, Ben P. said:

The first one with the tab on top is listed and pictured in the parts-book for the 1918 4-cyl models as No. 000 - part number: 1523.

4 of them were used on the steering knuckles, 4 more on the front spring shackles and various other places. They match what is on my car.

 

(I lent out my original parts-book, so the picture below is from a poor xerox copy. BTW, these parts-books are a major PITA. They very carefully illustrate each part only once - but there is NO rhyme or reason as to WHERE they chose to illustrate it. Rarely does the illustration appear with the first listing of a multiple use part.)

7E5F5AB0-92FD-4DFE-B9FB-54948B381474.jpeg

 

News to me.  Learn something new every day.  Still have not seen one on any of my vehicles.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)

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I looked in the 1918 picture parts book for 6 cylinder cars, and did not find grease cups listed, but you can see one on the transmission, and it HAS the twister thingy:

 

 

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My parts E-49 is 1918 and has all twisty grease cups, the 1917 E-49 has the old style cups. And before people tell me there were no 1917 E-49's let's put that to rest with these documents which actually tell the production for both years:

 

 

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With regard to Mr. Wright's close up photo of the grease cup on the transmission throw-out bearing in the 1918 Illustrated Parts Catalog - my 1916 D-45 (built in calendar year 1915 and have documentation for that) the grease cup has a flat topped cup on it.  I don't want to start any argument over this, but, I'd be willing to bet that somewhere during the 100+ years of these old cars being around and driven, things such as these grease caps got changed out somehow.  Who knows - maybe some of these things got vibrated loose and fell off.  If a person has the printed catalogs that has the photographic proof of what something was supposed to look like - then by all means - go that route.  All that I can say about grease cups at this point is this - Buick switched to the pin type Alemite grease fittings beginning with the 1920 models, and the production of those models started sometime in 1919.  That's my story and I'm stickin' to it.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out in COLD Doo Dah 

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1 hour ago, Terry Wiegand said:

With regard to Mr. Wright's close up photo of the grease cup on the transmission throw-out bearing in the 1918 Illustrated Parts Catalog - my 1916 D-45 (built in calendar year 1915 and have documentation for that) the grease cup has a flat topped cup on it.  I don't want to start any argument over this, but, I'd be willing to bet that somewhere during the 100+ years of these old cars being around and driven, things such as these grease caps got changed out somehow.  Who knows - maybe some of these things got vibrated loose and fell off.  If a person has the printed catalogs that has the photographic proof of what something was supposed to look like - then by all means - go that route.  All that I can say about grease cups at this point is this - Buick switched to the pin type Alemite grease fittings beginning with the 1920 models, and the production of those models started sometime in 1919.  That's my story and I'm stickin' to it.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out in COLD Doo Dah 

I’m confused. He asked a question re. one of his cars having one type and the other another. I looked at mine and found both types, No 000 and No. 00 illustrated for the 1918 4-cyl models AND they correspond exactly with what is physically on my 4-cyl car.

Don’s ‘18 also has both types.

Now WHO said anything about 1916 models? And WHAT does that have to do with things being vibrated off or somehow changed out?


I’m about to flag this. These inane arguments have got to stop.

Edited by Ben P. (see edit history)

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Here is a comparison of the owners manuals for a 1917 E-49 and a 1918 E-49:

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Buick Master parts list 1931

 

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The "Blue Book" of the National Used Car Market Report

 

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Edited by Morgan Wright (see edit history)

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Branham.jpg

 

 

 

 

Note below the E-49 was being shown with D series cars, no other E car existed yet.

 

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Edited by Morgan Wright (see edit history)

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Ben, 

Please relax a little bit here.  I openly stated in my post that I was not trying to start any argument about anything and specifically grease cups and/or caps.  I referenced my 1916 because I know that this car was built in the calendar year of 1915 and I know what style of grease 'caps' are on this car.  Since Mr. Wright has the photographic proof to back up his statements about the grease fittings on his car - he's golden as far as I'm concerned.  Factory issued publications will always settle any question(s) to my way of thinking.  I'm sorry that I mentioned it.  You guys can have at it.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas 

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The Red Book says my 1917 E-49 is only worth $127

 

If I lie and say it's a 1918, it's worth $195. I can get a cool extra $58 for it!!

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The Blue Book. For future readers who find this thread:

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That is interesting Morgan. Can see it goes to 1926 but what year was it published and do you have a picture of the cover?

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