Walt G

Images of the era

Recommended Posts

These are not expensive vehicles but definitely images of the era - both pictures of my Dad from the 30s.

IMG_0023.jpg

milk2.jpg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My dad (at the wheel)at sixteen and his late brother in 1934.

Grandpa had just bought his new 34 Dodge.

They drove it to Detroit from Seattle and back and grandpa used to brag "never had to lay a wrench on it"

FJs 34 Dodge.jpg

Edited by JACK M (see edit history)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When the owner restored this one in Australia used the model designation instead.

Phil's badge.JPG

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok I hope this doesn't get to many people reading this annoyed at me , but when I started this post "images of the era" ( plus others before that)  it was for that - mostly period photographs taken of the time period 1950 or so and earlier. Lots of family photos of cars/vehicles to look at  none of us had the chance to see before. The posting/comment of the monograms for the rear doors did see some current or contemporary color images of the subject under discussion, which helped clarify what we were "discussing".  Photos of car shows here and abroad of pre 1950 cars are interesting, but not images of the era  in my estimation. I am not stating they aren't interesting but perhaps belong under a different title/topic?  If this is turning into a "images" of any era topic, i will refrain from posting anything further as I would just like to see the b & w and perhaps early attempts at color photos remain under one title " of the era". Again, I state I am not against the more modern photos in color but just that they are in the wrong place. Everyone has their own opinion and wants to contribute what they can - go for it.

Anyway it was good while it lasted.

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just imagine how many hours went into that interior. There is this sort of joke about Rolls Royce. An interviewer was asking the head of production how fast the line moves at Rolls Royce, saying that at Ford the line moves so that a car is made once a minute. The Rolls head of production said, Let's see, I think the line moved last Thursday.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, Walt G said:

Photos of car shows here and abroad of pre 1950 cars are interesting, but not images of the era  in my estimation. I am not stating they aren't interesting but perhaps belong under a different title/topic?  If this is turning into a "images" of any era topic, i will refrain from posting anything further as I would just like to see the b & w and perhaps early attempts at color photos remain under one title " of the era".

Agree...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The round door Rolls-Royce is a well known car.  I first saw it when it was painted gold - it is now, I believe, black.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, black when I saw it at The Pete a few years back.    -    Carl 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Saved from old family photo albums:

 

IMG_1085.JPG

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for posting the photo of the roadster! WOW.  Is it a Roamer car?

Just to update the last two photos I posted - the lower one of the front of the car is a 1932 Packard , the upper one is of a Mercedes  town car that was imported into New York City.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Walt G said:

Ok I hope this doesn't get to many people reading this annoyed at me , but when I started this post "images of the era" ( plus others before that)  it was for that - mostly period photographs taken of the time period 1950 or so and earlier. Lots of family photos of cars/vehicles to look at  none of us had the chance to see before. The posting/comment of the monograms for the rear doors did see some current or contemporary color images of the subject under discussion, which helped clarify what we were "discussing".  Photos of car shows here and abroad of pre 1950 cars are interesting, but not images of the era  in my estimation. I am not stating they aren't interesting but perhaps belong under a different title/topic?  If this is turning into a "images" of any era topic, i will refrain from posting anything further as I would just like to see the b & w and perhaps early attempts at color photos remain under one title " of the era". Again, I state I am not against the more modern photos in color but just that they are in the wrong place. Everyone has their own opinion and wants to contribute what they can - go for it.

Anyway it was good while it lasted.

Now let's make it a challenge of finding VINTAGE photos of those Rolls Royces and Bentleys in the above photos.  It won't be too difficult as the number plates remain for the life of the vehicle, and I'm sure I've seen a vintage photo, perhaps in a R-R book of that interior.

 

Craig

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 As I mentioned  - it was good while it lasted - other projects have come on the horizon to take up my time so I hope someone else can "pick up the ball" and continue to post the period photographs that they may know about or have in their own collection to share with everyone. Walt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Walt, Good eye, that appears to be a Roamer from the early years, 1916-1919.  They certainly presented an elegant, sporting image compared to most of their contemporaries. It always makes me laugh to read in the Standard Catalog how they were promoted with "brochures quoted Oscar Wilde and used tony phrases such as 'a certain insouciance' to describe the product"  Not sure how a cars acts with 'lighthearted unconcern, nonchalance' by Webster's Dictionary.   

Roamer ca 1916-'19 cropped.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the balance and design of this particular body style is perfect. Look at the hood and cowl line to the windshield; from that point back look at the line of the edge of the top of the doors down the rear of the body - the rear section of course is longer but the angle is close enough to have that peak at the center ( windshield) that then trails off to both the front and back of the car in harmony and balance of style. . Small details that help are the lack of exterior door handles and hinges as well. A very very clean and striking design. This is capped at each end by thin fenders that capture the wheel/tire and in a sense act as a frame ( just like a thin frame on a picture hanging on a wall would).

OK , art lesson and design observation over for today. Yes, as mentioned before someplace on the forums I was an art teacher for 35+ years.

thanks for reading this all

Walt

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The upward sloping hood and cowl also are unusual at the time when most had a distinct transition from the straight, horizontal hood line to an upswept cowl.  The design does balance nicely with the corresponding slope from the windshield rearward.   The large, delicate wire wheels in thin fenders look very sporting.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5848889fdd5ba_1926ElcarLandauRoadsteroldpic(2).thumb.jpg.d5eb1d41d063efebfa94b06b5c6525da.jpg

Here you go, Walt. A period photo in my own collection. A full classic Mod. 8-81 1926 Landau Roadster. Anyone recognize the make? Taken in Kansas about 1930.

Photo credit: Glenn D. Brown.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jeff, thank you! what an absolutely great picture!!! Not only a really handsome car ( note the wonderful brackets at the windshield that hold the sun visor)  but look at the expression on the kids faces and how neat they look in their coats and hats! You do not see kids dressed well like that any longer - sneakers, hoodies, etc. The lady next to the car has a " oh hurry up and take the &$#%@ picture. "  look to her . I am sure the girl on the rear fender is explaining how high up she is off the ground and how it would not be a big deal to be able to jump down from there and land perfectly safe on the ground on her feet.

Walt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Walt, my Grandfather took the picture. Grandmother Lorena on the right, Aunt Geneva in the middle, and my Dad Bernard on the left. Funny, it's my Dad gesturing with his hands. He has a leather aviator helmet on and he's somewhere between 4 and 6 -- making it hard for you to tell who the people are. The helmet is not only good for when he rides in his Dad's Travel Air biplane, but the family went on a road trip from central Kansas to Mesa Verde, Colorado about a year earlier....so he would have needed it in the rumble seat. Unknown people, before your time, poorly captioned piccie & you still got 2 out of 3 right on the gender. Glad you liked the photo!

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jeff

thanks for further information on the photo! I do know well what a Travel Air plane is too. Way cool. Decades ago I was active in the Long Island Early Fliers Club and at that time when I was in my 20s there were members of the club that were active in aviation in the 1925-65 era. Many flew in bi planes or mono planes. One of them would have an annual aviation meet at his farm out on the east end of long island. I drove my 1931 Franklin out to that and most all in attendance went crazy because of its air cooled engine, like the planes had, most hadn't seen a Franklin since they were new. So I showed them the car , took many for a ride ( I was about 75 miles from home) and the fellow who owned the farm was so pleased I drove the car out he said - your turn for a ride. So into his open cockpit biplane we went ( I was younger and much braver - perhaps stupid?) then, and had a ride in that. Most interesting as he cautioned when I climbed in his plane to make sure the seat belt was fastened. He did a "loop the loop" as he called it and for a few moments during the complete circle when we were upside down it made me realize how it was to be a pilot or passenger in the "barn storming" days of aviation. I was glad to get back down on the ground. I still had white knuckles on the hour plus ride home in my Franklin from the ride in that bi plane.  Walt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now