Walt G

Images of the era

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On 1/5/2020 at 7:26 AM, Walt G said:

Here you go, Happy Sunday everyone

the photo  of the car with the hood up is a detail of a Franklin Dealers/salesman's  dinner in NY City and shows a 12 cylinder Franklin prototype - that engine was supposed to go into a production line of cars that shared the same bodies etc as the 1932 series 16a Airman, but using a extended chassis to accommodate the larger engine. That didn't happen because the bank took over the Franklin company and decided a completely new car would sell better. Not a wise choice - it didn't. ( I knew a fellow who as a young man worked at and for the bank that took over the Franklin company, interesting stories he had to relate to me ) The hood on this prototype was longer then the Airman series that had the 6 cylinder engine . First car on the left is the regular Airman, compare the details of the hood ( note the number of doors in the side) with the V12 with the raised hood.

Hope some of you find this interesting.

Walt

PeerlesParisSalonlate1930001.jpg

FranklinV12proto001.jpg

 

 

This is the best post on this forum in the last 3 months.  Which is pretty good considering some of my stuff. 

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3 hours ago, md murray said:

I guess that's it...pretty different looking.

stutz.jpg

I'm open to correction, but it sure appears to be a Biddle & Smart body!!

 

Craig

28_Essex_1.jpg

28_Essex_2.jpg

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16 hours ago, md murray said:

This Blackhawk? is spectacular. -I wish the guy wasn't standing there, I would love to see what the whole body. Is that seating behind him? Dual cockpit or I wonder if its all open? What are the little bits going along the top of windshield frame? Fasteners/snaps for a top? What an incredibly unique car-wow

Those are identified in the Stutz text by Katzell as Series AA Black Hawk four passenger speedster by Robbins.

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Well, here’s another one for your viewing pleasure... hopefully you can see the facial expressions on the dad and son...

28FB275C-8BE7-4071-9350-28282C7D037F.jpeg

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I also have this cabinet photo that is believed to be from an early Hillclimb up Mount Washington. Another interesting early photograph of sport motoring in the early years.

7462BDFB-52E4-4491-848D-16E5F853070C.jpeg

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21 minutes ago, Mark Wetherbee said:

Well, here’s another one for your viewing pleasure... hopefully you can see the facial expressions on the dad and son...

28FB275C-8BE7-4071-9350-28282C7D037F.jpeg

I hope he tightened the drive belt before doing any hillclimbs in that!!

 

Craig

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Posted (edited)
On 1/5/2020 at 11:58 AM, bryankazmer said:

Neat stuff.  Why would a V12 need a longer hood than a straight six?  Both are "six cylinders long." From an engineering perspective, not marketing advantage.

Because the Franklin V-12 is a massive engine - by the way, they have a great 3 speed transmission Freewheeling, and a Columbia two-speed back axle too - a FAST car

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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Thanks everyone for continuing to visit here and most of all share what you may have as well.  It is January and most of us can't use our cars stored in the garage until it gets warmer and clearer weather wise. But here we are looking at some fairly obscure vehicles , many that were stopped being made over 70 years ago, many that were made before we were born. BUT it seems we are all having a great time on the AACA Forums!

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20 hours ago, keiser31 said:

Has a Wills St Claire look to it.

Actually I'm pretty sure it is a 1924 Oakland. Herman was always an Oakland and Pontiac man, his last car was a 1965 Bonneville.

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3 hours ago, 8E45E said:

I hope he tightened the drive belt before doing any hillclimbs in that!!

 

Craig


I think it would be tightened by pressing the drive pedal as I don’t think the Browniecar was all that complicated a machine...

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17 hours ago, alsancle said:

 

 

This is the best post on this forum in the last 3 months.  Which is pretty good considering some of my stuff. 

 

Agree,.......  at least with the first sentence. :D

 

And the value goes beyond just looking at great pictures of old cars.  At least one of the pictures has also helped with a discussion in another thread !

 

Paul

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Here is a pic of our 33 Studebaker in 1957....6yrs before Dad purchased it

aaaa.jpg

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First 2 from 1962......the last one one from 2019

1913 caddy old.jpg

1913 caddy2.jpg

13 Caddy restored.jpg

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That is a beautiful Studebaker…. found this original 1933 picture, notice the black wall tires and the black wire wheels.

image.png.cda9ea896990a39f720361c3270c9f7b.png

 

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Posted (edited)

Yes I seen that pic online just last week as I had not seen it before...I believe it is a smaller series Studebaker...but that is a great pic.

In one of the duel side mounts on our car we still have one of the original, and bald blackwall tires.

Edited by coachJC (see edit history)
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Here is a little tougher photo to identify the make of car.  At first I though it maybe was a Buick of about 1920 vintage, but now I am more inclined to think it is a Dodge.  Anyone recognize the dash panel layout?

DODGE DSC05861.JPG

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OK here ya go , something else to look at. Yes, I know what they are but will wait to give you all something to think about ,have fun. ArtDeco(2)Bugatti1927Lavocat002.thumb.jpg.b5b7401209e6a7cd9a36a81afb5091fa.jpg27819267_WGGosdenin1931Lincolnsedan001.thumb.jpg.e42dc1bfb60956e42199cf1b9c48298f.jpg

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the photo of the Lincoln may have been taken in 1931 but it is not a 1931 Lincoln.

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3 hours ago, Walt G said:

the photo of the Lincoln may have been taken in 1931 but it is not a 1931 Lincoln.

No, its a '27 or '28, and not a Judkins or any of the higher-end coachbuilders, near as I can tell.

 

Craig

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Craig

It is a 1929 model L with stock factory 7 passenger sedan coachwork. That is my grand father standing next to it, he bought it new at Schulkraut Ford/Lincoln dealer in Queens , N.Y.

In the back ground at the end of the road is Belmont Park race track ,the north end of their property and all the white oak trees you see are still standing. The gate at the end of the road is still there ( dates from 1905) and is about 100 feet away from where I am typing this now , my house is directly behind where my grand father is standing and was built about 24 years after this photo was taken. I still have the bowler hat he is wearing and the spats, wish I had the car!

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Nice dog, great car..........the actor? Before my time.

A2C5F325-DCE7-4B54-9BF0-4C85976B1394.jpeg

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13 hours ago, Walt G said:

Craig

It is a 1929 model L with stock factory 7 passenger sedan coachwork. That is my grand father standing next to it, he bought it new at Schulkraut Ford/Lincoln dealer in Queens , N.Y.

In the back ground at the end of the road is Belmont Park race track ,the north end of their property and all the white oak trees you see are still standing. The gate at the end of the road is still there ( dates from 1905) and is about 100 feet away from where I am typing this now , my house is directly behind where my grand father is standing and was built about 24 years after this photo was taken. I still have the bowler hat he is wearing and the spats, wish I had the car!

Hi Walt

Your grandfather must have been doing quite well to purchase a new Lincoln then.  Please tell us more about him and his profession.

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