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Water in the crank case


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Buildup from condensation of not getting the oil hot enough is one cause. Used to be a big problem in early cars before the days of thermostats, or if someone took out a thermostat. In the early 20's there were even accessories like "Skinner rectifiers" that used engine exhaust heating of the oil to drive off water.

 

Paul  

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Other than what you mention, the only way is condensation buildup by not running  the engine hot enough to burn out the build up moisture in the oil or accindently  pouring water in the engine instead of the radiator. 

To determine water in oil  use a piece of sheet metal, pour a few drop of oil on the metal , use a torch and heat the tin underneath the oil. The water will pop,pop,pop under heat.  

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Even with an updraft carb, if it's flooding but not so excessively that the gas is also pouring out the choke horn, it will suck too much gas into the engine.

A too rich mixture will get vaporized as it's sucked up, but some will not atomize which it has to do to burn. It gets into the cylinders as droplets, not vapor.  Some of those droplets can coat the cylinder walls and get past the rings, especially if the rings are worn. If that goes on long enough, and the engine oil doesn't get hot enough to vaporize the gasoline getting past the rings and have it escape the crankcase, it will dilute engine oil, as Hidden-Hunter said. 

 

The difference is water will leave off- white or tan deposits of oil/water mix wherever oil spray can cool and condense, such as near the oil filler cap, or bottom of crankcase vent tube. 

 

Gas in the oil will not make noticeable color change deposits, but your nose will let you know there's gas dilution of the oil if you smell a sample from the crankcase. 

 

Paul

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)
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So the simple solution, is if there is any, make sure the shield between the rad and fan is there. Install an inline thermostat in the top rad hose. That will help to run the engine "hot" . Change the oil  frequently. and drive longer distances more frequently. IS THERE A CHANCE THE CRANKNCASE VENTILATION TUBE  IS DRAWING MOISTURE FROM OUTSIDE INTO THE CRANK CASE ? That engine has no oil pump, just splash feed.

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Chevy fours do indeed have an oil pump. I don't have one, but I have read many threads on the VCCA forums about oil pumps for those cars. The pumps are sometimes upgraded from a vane type to a gear type at rebuild.

 

The rods are not force fed. The mains may have varied by year.

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
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I owned a 1928 Chevrolet (National) and had lots of spare parts for earlier models too. Earlier than 1928 had no valve covers, just a wad of felt on the valve train. Had to use an oil can to pour oil every time before starting for the day. There was a dipper bolted to the bearing cap to splash oil on to the wall of the cylinder.  The 1928 has a valve cover . Uses 2 valve train bolts to keep it in place. The edges are sharp and no provision for gaskets. The head bolts have , I am not sure now, half inch or seven sixteen bolts but the threads were all by itself . Standard bolt thread will not work. I think that was made before standardiseation  of machine thread was introduced.  The engine had a water pump but I cannot remember any thermostat. To keep the engine oil from freezing in winter, an old gentleman told me he used a kerosene lamp lighted under the oil pan.

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Re'  water in oil---you didn't say if you drained oil, drove it, watching oil carefully and then got water in oil again, and, if so, how much water how quickly,all of which''d allow more precise  comments...as it is, it could be simply fixed (driving more to stop condensation), or frightening (cracks somewhere)...

If you can see the water in the radiator going down while the water in the pan rises, you have real problems...

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Bud Tierney, you are absolutely correct. Not enough information. If the engine is used regularly and the oil  and water level monitored, lets us say every x miles , and the oil level rises and the water  level drops then there is an equation to work with. 

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"mikly" definitely means water has tried to mix with the oil while the engine is running. With oil level that high I doubt it's from condensation. Time to start doing pressure checks of the cooling system.

 

Paul

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