eweave

Viking - Defunct GM brand

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8 minutes ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Thanks, With the known benefits of a 90 degree crankshaft already standard practice, why would they revert to flat plane crankshaft when developing these V8 engines?

 

Exhaust gathered across then exited down through the block!  Sounds as if the understanding of back pressure and excessive heat dispersed into the cooling system wasn't well understood...

Ford flat head V8 does it too.

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 Earlier you wrote "I believe Viking is the only GM companion brand I've never seen in person."

3 hours ago, Billy Kingsley said:

I've seen several Oaklands.

The Oakland was never a companion car.  It was a recognized GM Division from 1909 when it was purchased by W.C.D.  In the twenties GM was working on the idea of a balanced systematic price step up that would provide upward mobility to the buying public. In it's first two years Pontiac sold 204,553 units   In 1930 Pontiac (the companion sold 188,000 cars while the Oakland sold 24,443.  Death knell for Oakland. At the years end in 1931 the Oakland Motor Car Company became Pontiac Motor Company.  Pontiac was the only long time surviving "Companion car" once the LaSalle was shut down.  Ultimately Pontiac also became an Orphan car in December 2009 following the demise of Oldsmobile in 2004

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Yes, neither was Cartercar, but I was replying to 8E45 who asked me specifically if I had seen one. (I have seen a Cartercar, but I have not gotten far enough back in my image sorting project to pinpoint where and when just yet)

 

I checked my list, and I have NOT seen a Marquette either. And I was way off on the numbers, I thought I was over 250 but I'm only at 211. Of course, 211 is still a fantastic number. 

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Here's my 9-year-old son driving a 1909 Cartercar. As easy to drive as anything--one pedal for go, one pedal for stop, get in trouble, just release everything and it stops. I figured he couldn't get in trouble in a parking lot.

 

881434081_2019-09-1413_14_42.thumb.jpg.0c362ade5e77ee43144d2cf1285293fd.jpg

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If you can all pardon a bit of further thread drift. A couple posts including from carbking were about Johnson carburetors, and comments about their lack of "rebuildability" brings a few comments and questions. The 1927 Paige 6-45 used a Johnson model H carburetor.  I don't know just how many variations they had, but I have seen at least four different ones. My car had a '30s Ford four cylinder carburetor on it when my dad bought it way back in '67. The carburetor it had turned out to be somewhat rare, and I gave it to a fellow that needed it a long time ago. In addition to the model H, I acquired a slightly larger Johnson carburetor of similar design (I don't recall the model, and it isn't readily handy to look at it). Most of the Johnson carburetors of the mid to late '20s I have seen were made mostly of some form of pot metal. Most, clearly are NOT rebuildable, with the pot metal warping and cracking beyond any level of reliability even IF one could make it work at all (the larger one I have is that way, so even IF it was a desirable model for a larger rare car, it is basically worthless). I also found and acquired a couple of Johnson model H carburetors, with the hope of maybe someday getting the car running with a correct carburetor. To this end, I did get lucky. As I said, "most" Johnson carburetors of the era were made of pot metal. Some, at least a few, were cast in what appears to be aluminum. I did find and get an aluminum cast model H.

Question to carbking et al, is the aluminum model H (in decent looking condition!) likely worth rebuilding or not? The casting is rather thin.

If I ever get the car put together, and the Johnson isn't worth fooling with, I will just go back to plan B and use a Stromberg or Zenith brass carburetor of the era. I have a couple of those squirreled away on a shelf.

 

Billy K, I look forward to seeing a thread listing all the marques you have seen! I would find that very interesting.

 

Now back to the Viking! I have seen a couple over the years, but there does not appear to be many around. I do hope eweave can get one or both of theirs back on the road, as they were meant to be. Depending upon what pieces are missing? Like with many other cars, a lot of parts can be fabricated with a little creativity and stubbornness. And a lot of parts would likely interchange with little to no effort with other GM Cars of the era.

I do hope to see more posts from eweave.

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Wayne - I guess the answer would depend on what you plan to do with the car. If a numbers-and-components-matching show car that will never be started OR a museum car that will never be started; then clean up the Johnson.

 

Johnson made brass carburetors earlier than years. Reo was one of their customers. Some 40 years ago, I started offering the new agricultural Zenith carburetors IN SOME INSTANCES as replacements for older cars/trucks. One day received a telephone call from a customer with a Reo, who planned only to drive (if he could) his Reo in parades. Sold him one of the Zeniths. Didn't hear from him for about 6 months or so. Received a package from UPS that weighed about 90 pounds. This was when one still had to pay quite a bit extra for anything over 70 pounds. Inside, there were some 15 brass Johnson carburetors, with a note "please give this junk a good home!". He called about a week later, telling me how well the Reo ran on the Zenith compared to what anyone at the Reo convention had ever seen a Reo run.

 

Your decision, but personally, would suggest the Johnson only for looks.

 

Jon.

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I posted a screenshot of my Excel chart in the How was your 2019 thread I started. It lists all 211 brands I've seen in alphabetical order.

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Thank you Billy K! I did discover it sometime later and enjoyed looking over your list!

 

Carbking, Thank you. Pretty much what I figured. I do also have a '10s era brass Johnson. I don't know what it is of off, and have kept it as I may have a use for an earlier small brass carburetor. It appears to be in decent condition.

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