eweave

Viking - Defunct GM brand

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Anyone have any leads on parts or people who are familiar with the brand. The vehicle shared Oldsmobile and Cadillac parts and my father has two incomplete models.

One is a 1929 four door and the other is a 1930 roadster.

Both are very incomplete.

 

Thanks

Edited by eweave
Grammar (see edit history)

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I have never heard of the car but here is some information about the car.

 

Viking is an automobile manufactured by General Motors' Oldsmobile division, in Lansing, Michigan, for model years 1929 to 1931 and used the GM B platform.

Viking was part of Alfred Sloan's companion make program introduced to help span gaps in General Motors’ pricing structure, and was marketed through GM's Oldsmobile division. Viking was one of four makes introduced by General Motors, the other lines (and their GM divisions) being Pontiac (Oakland), Marquette (Buick) and LaSalle (Cadillac). Of the four makes, Viking was the only one priced higher than its "parent" make.[1]

220px-Canmania_Car_show_-_Wimborne_%2895
 
1930 Viking

Riding a 125 in (3,175 mm) wheelbase with steel semi-elliptic springs and a 44 1/2 foot turning circle,[2] Vikings were powered by a monobloc V8 engine, the first automobile using this type of engine construction.[1] Vikings were available as 4-door sedan, deluxe 4-door sedan, convertible coupé with rear deck seat, deluxe convertible coupé with rear deck seat, close-coupled 4-door sedan and deluxe close-coupled 4-door sedan.[1] The front seat and the steering wheel were adjustable.[3]

Viking production for 1929 was 4,058 units and 1930 2,813.[1] GM discontinued the Viking and the Marquette at the end of the 1930 model year, preferring to bet on Oldsmobile and Buick which had better consumer awareness. However, an additional 353 units were assembled using existing parts and marketed as 1931 models.[1]

 

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I will PM you with some info on Viking owners.  There are indeed a few around but Parts may be a problem!!  Info I have is a bit old but Vikings have been shown at Olds and AACA meets for years. 

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Interesting how the engine is so similar to the Oakland/Pontiac V8 but without the svncronizer lever.  Also neat that they describe it as having a "down-draft intake manifold" but not mentioning that it still has an ancient up-draft carburetor.  Salesmanship brainwashing the customer.

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A mass-produced mono-block V-8 engine fully three years before the '32 Ford V-8 that everyone thinks was the first. GM deserves more recognition for this accomplishment with both the Viking and Oakland-Pontiac mono-block V-8's.  One wonders why these engines weren't developed further and utilized by both automakers rather than straight eights.

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38 minutes ago, Tinindian said:

Interesting how the engine is so similar to the Oakland/Pontiac V8 but without the svncronizer lever.  Also neat that they describe it as having a "down-draft intake manifold" but not mentioning that it still has an ancient up-draft carburetor.  Salesmanship brainwashing the customer.

Oldsmobile used a Johnson type R updraft carburetor on the Viking. This is the same type that Packard tried for 4 months in 1929, and then stopped, and went back to Detroit Lubricator.

 

I started playing with carburetors in 1960, and to this date have not seen a complete rebuildable Johnson type R.

 

Jon.

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Have you ever seen a Johnson carburetor worth rebuilding? 😎

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5 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

A mass-produced mono-block V-8 engine fully three years before the '32 Ford V-8 that everyone thinks was the first. GM deserves more recognition for this accomplishment with both the Viking and Oakland-Pontiac mono-block V-8's.  One wonders why these engines weren't developed further and utilized by both automakers rather than straight eights.

a straight eight using a 90 degree crankshaft was inherently a much more smoother running engine, and more economically to manufacture.

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9 hours ago, edinmass said:

Have you ever seen a Johnson carburetor worth rebuilding? 😎

 

No, but it IS the holiday season, was trying to be nice, not naughty! ;)

 

Jon

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45 minutes ago, carbking said:

No, but it IS the holiday season, was trying to be nice, not naughty! ;)

 

That sounds a lot like me saying "restraint is my least recognized attribute"

 

Bernie

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19 hours ago, pontiac1953 said:

a straight eight using a 90 degree crankshaft was inherently a much more smoother running engine, and more economically to manufacture.

That was true at the time, certainly in the early 1930's.  I suspect the lessons learned from those two engines was included in the development of GM's next mono-block V8; the '36 Cadillac 322 and 346.   This time, they got it right in spades!

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3 hours ago, Billy Kingsley said:

I believe Viking is the only GM companion brand I've never seen in person. Hopefully someday.

Have you ever seen a Cartercar? Sheridan? Oakland? or a Marquette?

 

Craig

10tm066.jpg

1921_Sheridan.jpg

29_Oakland.jpg

29_Marquette.jpg

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When I was a kid a friend of my father's had a yellow Viking roadster. I recall thinking it was a big car, but I was just a little kid. I remember liking the sound it made. Was the Viking a half step up from Olds or a half step down?

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3 hours ago, 8E45E said:
7 hours ago, Billy Kingsley said:

I believe Viking is the only GM companion brand I've never seen in person. Hopefully someday.

Have you ever seen a Cartercar? Sheridan? Oakland? or a Marquette?

8E45E Oakland is NOT the companion car.  Pontiac is.  Pontiac is the one companion car that outlasted the marque that it was companion to.

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6 hours ago, Tinindian said:

8E45E Oakland is NOT the companion car.  Pontiac is.  Pontiac is the one companion car that outlasted the marque that it was companion to.

Pontiac started out as the 'companion car' in 1926, but by 1929, the Oakland demoted itself to becoming the tagalong companion car.

 

Craig

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)

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Was the Viking a half step up from Olds or a half step down?

 

Matt

 

Viking was a half step up from Oldsmobile, in the $1, 595-$1,695 range for the two years respectively, around $500 more than the general Oldsmobile range.  In terms of spec's, they were like a Fisher-bodied '27 LaSalle 303 but with a 259 ci rather than a 303 ci V8.  They unfortunately competed with the '29 Buick 121 and 129 and the '30 Series 50 and 60.  Filling the price gaps was becoming more problematic with too many nameplates. 

Edited by 58L-Y8
Forgot Matt's question quote. (see edit history)

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11 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

When I was a kid a friend of my father's had a yellow Viking roadster. 

 

Around the year 2000, there was a yellow Viking 

roadster for sale--an older restoration--and I inquired.

Could it be the same one?  How many in that color 

could there be?

 

When I decided not to pursue it, I told people at the

Oldsmobile Club of America tent at a major show.

I figured they'd jump at the opportunity for such a rare car

in their favorite car family, but they must have been too

deeply into Cutlass 442's and showed absolutely zero interest

in a Viking.

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I don't consider Cartercar a companion brand, rather it was one that just didn't survive. I've seen several Oaklands. The Marquette is why I couldn't just say out right that Viking was the only one. I can't remember for sure, and my Excel chart where I track what I've seen is not available to me on my tablet. 

 

I've seen and photographed more than 250 brands, actually planning to post about that in the next day or two. 

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On 12/26/2019 at 4:21 PM, 58L-Y8 said:

A mass-produced mono-block V-8 engine fully three years before the '32 Ford V-8 that everyone thinks was the first. GM deserves more recognition for this accomplishment with both the Viking and Oakland-Pontiac mono-block V-8's.  One wonders why these engines weren't developed further and utilized by both automakers rather than straight eights.

 

These engines use a flat plane crank which is very rough hence the pud knocker on the Oakland/Pontiac V-8. The Pontiac straight eight was easier to produce and was smoother , quieter and made more or the same HP. on the available fuel at the time. I would like to see a picture of the other side of the Viking engine. Pontiac / Oakland exhaust through the engine block.

Related image

Related image You can see all the exhaust manifold runners gather at the top of the engine  at the middle and exhaust down and through the left side of the block and out.

Edited by Pfeil (see edit history)

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Thanks, With the known benefits of a 90 degree crankshaft already standard practice, why would they revert to flat plane crankshaft when developing these V8 engines?

 

Exhaust gathered across then exited down through the block!  Sounds as if the understanding of back pressure and excessive heat dispersed into the cooling system wasn't well understood...

Edited by 58L-Y8
Exhaust comments. (see edit history)

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