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When I think of Chrysler, I think of the 31 CG and the 32/33 CL.  But there were other models accepted by the CCCA:  1926-1932 Imperial and Series 80, Includes Series CG, CH, CL; 1929 Chrysler, 6 cyl, Model 77; 1932-1939 Custom Imperial Series – CL, CX, CW, C-3, C-11, C-15, C-20, C-24; 1934-1937 Airflow Imperial Eight models CV, C2, C10, C17;1940-1948 Crown Imperial – Includes Series C-27, C-30N, C-33, C-37, C-40; Newports and Thunderbolts; 1941-1948 Town & Country.

 

I think a thread on Classic Chyrsler would be interesting.   Last night laying in bed fumbling around wtih my phone I stumbled on this:

 

https://www.hemmings.com/classifieds/cars-for-sale/chrysler/cl/2316478.html

 

20 years ago I would have been the guy that fell for it.  A GREAT car that needs a lot of money poured in to it.  Not sure where the market is now,  but a few years ago a perfect no stories CL Roadster would bring 500k or more.   So theoretically you might be able to finish this and be in good shape.    I hope it goes to a good home.

 

Thoughts?

 

1932 CL Chrysler Custom Imperial Convertible/Roadster. Project. Restoration started many years ago on a rough car that was saved from extinction. Chassis and mechanicals are done. Engine rebuilt and running, though not detailed. Wood, top irons and wheels are restored. Believed to be near 100 % complete (still taking inventory). From the estate of Ed Perkins, long time Custom Imperial collector. More photos will be added. I will be at Hershey spaces GCF13-19 for more info. and diccussion in person.

Price: $170,000 negotiable

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Edited by alsancle (see edit history)
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Big Chrysler’s are great cars..........the only fault I can find with them is they are a bit smaller than many of their contemporaries so tall or long legged people have a difficult time fitting in them.  Here is a photo of my favorite Chrysler, and I have been fortunate to drive it a bit. I’m a big fan of the car, and it’s designer. 

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1 hour ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Dragones also had a sharp maroon convrtible sedan, I cannot find among the 2,000 pics on this phone, I would submit to counter Ed's criticisms of convt. Sedans.  Auburn I think did a great job but the Chrysler is really sharp also.

 

The maroon car they had was a 31 CG Dual Cowl.  This is the CL convertible sedan they had.

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This is the maroon CG Dual Cowl.

 

https://dragoneclassic.com/currentofferings/1931-chrysler-imperial/

The 1931 Chrysler Imperial with coachwork by LeBaron, especially in dual cowl form, is one of the most beautiful and sexy American cars of the classic era. LeBarons signature vee windscreen and fender design are even more beautiful in person. This particular example is one of the most significant, greatest and most original examples left today.

Most notably, this car was previously owned by the great collector and singer James Melton of Connecticut who purchased the car in the late 1940's or early 1950's. It then went to Dr. Robert DeHart of Massachusetts who purchased the car from Melton in the late 1950's. He restored the car in 1963 and kept it until the 1980's when it was sold to the well known Chrysler collector David Huckins of New Hampshire. He restored the car again to its present and beautiful condition it is in today. Body, Chassis, engine, everything is original to this car which is very seldom seen today on these cars. The powerful straight eight engine runs beautiful and the car looks amazing. If you are looking for a very beautiful and significant American classic, this is it both with its delightful looks and outstanding provenance.

 

 

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47 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

The maroon car they had was a 31 CG Dual Cowl.  This is the CL convertible sedan they had.

1932-Chrysler-Imperial-phaeton-Dragone-Hershey-2014.jpg

Damn, I am getting old.  Yes, convt. Sedan I saw was in fact the green one, looks nice open or closed.  I need to revisit my pics I have a closed shot or two I think...

 

As an aside love both shades of green on these big boys.

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I think Johnny P. Has a 32 or 33 CL sedan, he was kind of excited about it, original car, but that was a few years back, when he was more active in the hobby/business.  Website up but has not changed in at least a year.

 

Ed if you find one of those ugly convt. Sedans send it on over! 🙂

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28 minutes ago, md murray said:

Really snazzy body lines on Chrysler and I appreciate how unique it is but dollar for dollar I sort of like that green Royale convertible coupe that was offered recently way better 

 

The owner of the Royale is having a new top put on it and it will be back on the market later in the winter.  Much less money than CL Roadster.   I'm a Royale guy but I would have to go with the CL.  384 vs 359,  More expensive when new, etc.   The styling is subjective.

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This is a good point to raise the question about the '32 Imperial CH performance capabilities relative to its contemporaries.  From reading the spec's, it appears as if the CH would be on par with the '30 Packard 734 Speedsters.  Now, those who have been fortunate enough to drive each, please describe your experiences to satisfy our curiosity. 

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56 minutes ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Now, those who have been fortunate enough to drive each, please describe your experiences to satisfy our curiosity. 


I’m still waiting for Ed to do that for PI-PII Rolls,  which he knows by heart.

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On 12/19/2019 at 6:34 PM, edinmass said:

By the way......just because  the CCCA says a Town and Country is a Classic........doesn’t mean it is. It’s a Windsor...........and should not be eligible. My two cents.

I am ok with it, I sort of got fired up when I saw a meeting minute note that they were researching Packard 120 cars (and I get it that they are stylish, more plentiful,  much easier to restore, easier drive than Senior cars, plus have plenty of other benefits too), but look at all the other comparable cars that are not CCCA and a whole bag of worms that is best left unopened. 

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23 hours ago, edinmass said:

STATEMENT OF FACT......

 

 

I have owned countless motor vehicles.........countless. I have NEVER owned ANY convertible sedan. Nuff said. 

Convertible Sedan's are nice in that you can pack in the whole family and actual all stay "relatively" dry, not windblown, and have a conversation - or you can put the top down and enjoy the view.  As you know, we generally always have 4-door convertibles - at least for tour cars. :) 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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17 hours ago, alsancle said:


I’m still waiting for Ed to do that for PI-PII Rolls,  which he knows by heart.

You had one too (RR PI) - get writing :).  And, I had one, though I have not written a drive report as mine had a bunch of end of the line "L Series" mechanical stuff on it such as transmission and steering that was not the norm compared to the bulk of the cars ( A to K Series cars). 

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On 12/19/2019 at 8:41 AM, alsancle said:

 

Price: $170,000 negotiable

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By the way - one sweet looking car !  I would gladly restore a car in this condition either pre-restoration or how it exists today.  And, sure for every forward movement there will be plenty of backward too, but really cool and stylish cars. Friends use to have a 31 cabriolet and they preached that there were fabulous automobiles; and hands over most other 30's cars of the era.   All said though, the hood doors and the sidemount covers (both of them) need re -installed for ALL the sale photos.

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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22 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

You had one too  - get writing :).  And, I had one, though I have not written a drive report as mine had a bunch of end of the line "L Series" mechanical stuff on it such as transmission and steering that was not the norm compared to the bulk of the cars ( A to K Series cars). 

 

Which one did I have?

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On 12/19/2019 at 8:41 AM, alsancle said:

 

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Sidenote:  It would look REALLY GOOD in tu-tone of blue again (perhaps leave the wheels black and put a black pinstripe on it).

Correction:  Wheels and possibly frame look dark green 

On 12/19/2019 at 8:41 AM, alsancle said:

 

 

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2 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

I thought you had a Green PI Ascot Touring ?

 

Unfortunately two ships passing in the night.   I can sputter on about a lot of cars,  but the PI I have only driven up and down the  driveway.   Ed or you need to do the play by play on Springfield Rolls.

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50 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

I have no idea,  but I'm wondering how much of the blue car is the one in the advertisement. 

Probably pretty much - in the 70's we would have all said ROUGH-ROUGH-ROUGH, but today probably just rough but not all that bad either.   I assume the best parts of the two cars went on the Convertible Coupe too - all be it I could be wrong. 

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11 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

Unfortunately two ships passing in the night.   I can sputter on about a lot of cars,  but the PI I have only driven up and down the  driveway.   Ed or you need to do the play by play on Springfield Rolls.

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Pretty sweet ride even if just for driveway driving.  As to mine, by the time I had all the quirks worked out (and tackled them pretty much one at a time as I have a "thing" about taking cars too far apart at any one time), I was pretty much done (as well as everyone helping me was pretty done too) -  a challenging car = I only had a few miles under belt.

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It took me a while to figure out I had to count to about 30 after starting it before I shifted.  Then, it took me a while to figure out the clutch was either on or off - no in between.  Then, I had to figure out I could not double clutch it and had to shift straight through - which was counter-intuitive for a non sycromesh car of the era (aka as car had a clutch brake on it).   Then, once I figured that out I found I had it running fabulous, but I had to richen it up substantially as there was not enough gas at any speed over idle and especially at speed.   And, I had a ton of problems to work through for a car that probably had 5 miles put on it in 40 years.  The joys were a car that had never seen a speck of rust, a car people had been into for all the right reasons and had kept their hands off it otherwise, low mileage, and you only had to turn the steering wheel 1/2 turn for a full right and 1/2 turn for a full left - I had people in England refere to it as half-point steering and they said few cars had it - dreamy over 10mph, but under ten I did not have the strength.    Also, incredibly comfortable seats and seating position, albeit you had to be somewhat a monkey to get in and out - suicide front doors only helped a little, but did help.   Also, very nice it had glove boxes and also a toolbox under front seat, but thank god it had a luggage trunk as again a  huge car with no place to put anything. As to faults:  A complicated car by even today's standards (must have been mind blowing complicated when new) and massive, plus via that close coupled coachwork you could really see nothing out of the back of it (lots of glitzy mirrors though that allowed seeing nothing).  Also, short top end speed - needed another gear in the gearbox, but IMPRESSIVE torque and could get you up to speed quick.  Would I recommend one ?  Yes I would, though it is a car that owns you verses you owning it and you have to be patient, know how to write a check, and be handy (even if someone is working on it for you). 

 

Impressive stature on it - most people do not realize the size of the engine - just as with a Dusenberg it is chest height and really long, with a ton of aluminum and little polished trinkets. As to engineering - I would say complicated in a different way than a Duesenberg and as a result actually a more sophisticated product. 

 

Update:  Brakes - the car has 20" wheels and brakes drums must have almost 18" +/-  - servo assist off transmission and they pulsate in a primitive version of ABS,  teh Brake drums are steel and finned - I loved that they were turned and you could see the turning marks.  And they are spectacular, though I assume do have fade upon extreme usage.   And, whoever say 20's and 30's cars do not stop have never been in a RR - THEY STOP !!!

 

Further Update: Electrical = Westinghouse (I believe) and more so on the commercial than automotive side - pretty impressive and the wiring I believe is Westinghouse too - also commercial side. 

 

Further-Further Update: Also, no die cast other than the windshield wiper - everything is brass, bronze, steel, aluminum, German silver, or ...

 

Further-Further-Further Update: The vacuum system is good too for fuel delivery - there is a tank on the firewall that holds perhaps 1.5 gallons and the tank is 22 gallons I believe.  There is a dual pick-up mechanism (many people think two tanks with one being a reserve, but it is a high and a low pick up - allowing you clean gas without contaminates from bottom of tank (unless you have a gas emergency).   Perhaps the only advantage would have been the ability to prime the vacuum tank - obviously, a 7.6 Litre engine creates enough vacuum to pull from tank when system is dry, but ...

 

I am going to stick with 35-36 Auburns for the moment.  Ed, had me thinking about a 1931 Pierce Arrow Series 42 Berline Club Sedan though.  A couple people keep preaching a Cord L-29 Brougham for me and a couple more a 1932 Franklin Club Sedan.  JCNA friends say I need a XK150 Drophead.  And, ...

 

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Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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This CH is selling at World Wide in Scottsdale next month.

 

https://worldwideauctioneers.com/car-details/?id=71&rid=30

 

384.8 cid L-head inline eight-cylinder engine rated at 125 HP, four-speed manual transmission, solid front axle and live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf-spring suspension, four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes; wheelbase: 135”


The automobile comes in all sizes and shapes but, at the height of the Classic Era of the 1930s, the road was ruled by some of the largest and grandest cars ever made. This was the time when great names like Stutz, Marmon, Pierce-Arrow, Peerless, Packard, and Duesenberg ruled the road in grand phaetons, luxurious town cars, and dashing roadsters. Beautiful factory and coachbuilt bodies were the order of the day and they were loaded with dazzling chrome and fine woodwork. Nestled comfortably within these hallowed ranks was the Imperial from Chrysler. Large, richly appointed, supremely elegant, and powerful are just a few words that describe these stately cars as their imposing size was more than enough to loudly announce one’s arrival to a societal event.

Offered here is an excellent example of Chrysler’s Imperial, a beautiful 1932 Chrysler Imperial CH with power from a large 385 cubic-inch inline eight. This Imperial was once in the superb collection of mechanical engineer Franklin Farnsworth, who purchased it in Southern California back in 1952. Mr. Farnsworth owned it for 57 years and while in his possession it was completely restored and then won several awards including an AACA National First. Years of meticulous care have maintained it in the excellent condition that it presents in today. The paint, upholstery, engine and chassis are all very clean, well done, and have no visible defects. This Imperial CH is a convertible sedan that features all-weather protection with roll-up windows. The smooth and graceful body lines of this CCCA Full Classic® are nicely accented in a two-tone burgundy and black paint finish. At the front, its tall grille is topped with Chrysler’s “Leaping Gazelle” radiator ornament and twin trumpet horns add a touch of classic elegance. Attractive split-vee pop-out windshields provide a striking feature while the dramatic length of the front fenders is highlighted with dual side-mounted spare tires encased in hard shell covers. A large touring trunk is located at the rear and functional landau bars on the top represent an era where there was art in design. Of course, one could only expect that a car of this stature would have an interior that rivals the finest mansions in Beverly Hills and to this end the Imperial CH does not disappoint. Indeed, it speaks to an era of hand-crafted elegance and master craftsmanship that has long passed. The interior is upholstered in fine tan leather that’s soft and supple. All door panels, carpeting, and trim accessories are accounted for and the dashboard is a marvel of simplicity with all gauges neatly housed in a center-mounted gauge cluster complete with clock face styled gauges. Rear passengers are treated to the ultimate in comfort as the long wheelbase provides for ample legroom that is impressive. The front windows also swing out for ventilation. Power for this Imperial comes from its inline eight-cylinder in an engine compartment that carries correct wiring and clamps while the intake and exhaust manifolds are finished in baked porcelain enamel. Chrysler engineering always dictated that their engines were reliable, and this straight-eight is no exception. Smooth, powerful, and quiet were just a few of the hallmarks that made the Imperials' arrival more of a sight to behold rather than announcing itself with unnecessary noise. This Imperial rides on wide whitewall tires that are mounted on black wire wheels with Imperial chrome hubcaps. This Imperial has been displayed more than driven since 2014, which accounts for its pristine current condition.

Beauty, rarity, and splendor all come together in this magnificent Chrysler from the Golden Era of the motorcar. In all, Chrysler built just 152 CH convertible sedans. For the absolute best from Chrysler’s CH model, this Imperial, with its beautiful restoration and opulent appointments, makes it a motorcar that can be shown and driven for optimal enjoyment.

 

 

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