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1924 Six factory dash photo.


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Does anyone have a nice straight on clear 1924 (not '23 or '25) factory photo of the dash and the  two dash instruments for the 1924 Six? The Gas/Oil/Amp/Clock cluster and the Speedometer/Odometer gauge. An actual factory photo. If so could you post the pic? There are some details I would like to verify for myself by looking at an an actual factory photo that's for 1924.

Thanks in Advance.

Edited by 29StudiePrez (see edit history)
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Shawn:

 The first is a photo of the 1924-55 only the ignition light switch has the incorrect back color. Gold. The combo oil, amp, fuel gage and clock unit are the same as what should be in the model 51.

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583938151_1925-Buick-111.jpg.12eca066e31cc3ef2f72a45221423ac4.jpg 

Same arrangement on the 1925-55 including cigar lighter. Plus a few other incorrect button/switch. Not to have wood grain but to be covered with Black whale grain leather.

 530500311_1924-buick-24-55-master-tourer1(5).thumb.jpg.9d817323b9fb6f1b7b4e77ffc1fe3076.jpg

Export 1924-55

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1924 Model 49 with remote gas gage in the center of cluster.

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1924-44 with the Buick logo in the center of the oil/amp gage unit. This is the same as what is in my 1925 Master.

 

 

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Larry,

The reason I asked, is because I was recently told that even though the instrument face plates were black in 1924 the actual instruments were white backgrounds with black letters and the ones that are all black with white letters are 1925 and most people with cars have a mix match of both. So I was trying to confirm this by seeing if there was a factory publicity photo out there, taken at the time, actually showing the dash of a 1924 Six so I could see for verification for myself. I'm trying to keep my car historically correct. And if in 1924 if the dials on the large instrument cluster were white with black letters, Amp/Oil/Gas then was the clock also originally white with black letters to match the rest?

 

 

Edited by 29StudiePrez
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29 StudiePrez,

 

I asked the same question back in May 2017 and never got a clear answer.

 

FWIW, this is my dashboard of my car as found.

 

Clearly you can see white instruments with black writing. The clock and speeedo were missing 😟 (as obviously someone wanted them more than me), so we can assume they were the same.

 

The curious part is the "teal" background colour. I have not seen this in any other photos, although i have seen alot more of the more common "gold" colour.

 

I do now have a complete/matching set of instruments, but they are now black faces with black/white gauges.

 

Good luck with your searching.

 

David.

 

 

20121111_103248.jpg

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5 hours ago, 1924 6-55 Sport Tourer said:

29 StudiePrez,

 

I asked the same question back in May 2017 and never got a clear answer.

 

FWIW, this is my dashboard of my car as found.

 

Clearly you can see white instruments with black writing. The clock and speeedo were missing 😟 (as obviously someone wanted them more than me), so we can assume they were the same.

 

The curious part is the "teal" background colour. I have not seen this in any other photos, although i have seen alot more of the more common "gold" colour.

 

I do now have a complete/matching set of instruments, but they are now black faces with black/white gauges.

 

Good luck with your searching.

 

David.

 

 

20121111_103248.jpg

 

With all that weathering, I'm not sure I would trust that teal color. 

 

I guess the model 55's got the clock, the lower model numbers not so much.  It appears like the 55's also had color matching the interiors.

 

I would think that lower models would be black backgrounds with white letters, and all gauge faces should match the same.

 

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David, 

In zooming in on your dash, it also looks like the choke control has what appears to be old paint that looks maroon in color, and the dash looks like it used to be some type of tiger stripe woodgrain design. I find this very interesting to know what options were available and what actually came out of the factory, really wish there had been factory photos somewhere of these dashes on the various models. And there is also still the mystery of whether or not the clocks came in anything other than black faces with white numbers regardless of the instrument gauge color.

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29 StudiePrez,

 

From what i have gathered from the forum, the Sports Tourers and Sport Roadsters had the dash face that were upholstered in the same leather as the rest of the car.

 

The pattern i believe was called " Whale grain".

 

I would have thought that if Buick were to have "white" instruments fitted, it would have made sense that all gauges should be white too ! , until i too can see photos to the contrary this will remain my belief.

 

The ckoke plate had an infill of either a faded red or a maroon. I belive that this will match the infill on the steering controls as well.

 

Hope this helps,

 

David.

 

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And something else that needs to be mentioned here is the fact that there is no such model as a 1924 Master.  The Standard and Master model designations did not start until the 1925 model year.  The 1924 models were a 'stand alone' offering.  A lot of people seem to make this mistake with the 1924's.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Shawn, 

    The correct terminology for your car is a "1924 Buick 6 cylinder".  The Master designation came out in 1925 with the introduction of the smaller 6 cylinder for the 4 cylinder line which was named the Standard.  Only you can change the title of your thread.   

 

Please post a photo of your dash board.   We love real examples and realize things get changed around.  Hugh

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Shawn:

 Here is the link to some of the parts I mentioned to you in our PM. Again this fellow is finding out that STEAMPUNK designations on these items are not getting them to sell any better. He has indicated that he has cut his price in half. There are other items from this derelict chassis on ebay also. It seems that his asking prices for an item is a bit high even for the entire chassis.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Grill-Radiator-Nickel-Chrome-1924-27-Buick-1925-1926-1927-24-25-26-27/163988422943?hash=item262e78c11f:g:b~kAAOSwPfBdhmkp

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3 hours ago, dibarlaw said:

Shawn:

 Here is the link to some of the parts I mentioned to you in our PM. Again this fellow is finding out that STEAMPUNK designations on these items are not getting them to sell any better. He has indicated that he has cut his price in half. There are other items from this derelict chassis on ebay also. It seems that his asking prices for an item is a bit high even for the entire chassis.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Grill-Radiator-Nickel-Chrome-1924-27-Buick-1925-1926-1927-24-25-26-27/163988422943?hash=item262e78c11f:g:b~kAAOSwPfBdhmkp

 

Yes, I've actually spoken to him on the phone and the firewall tag on that is 26-24. It's in N.Dakota under 5ft of snow and very cold, nothing is available until April/May and there isn't anything there useable for me.

20190919_133440.jpg

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Thanks Shawn for the extra photo. From what I found on ebay there was little else to help identify other than the view of the roached out dash. Agreed that it is a 1926 but a Master anyway. The 26-24 ID  does not make sense. That would be for a Standard roadster.  This was a closed car. Of course with the cut back "doodlebug" frame we can't tell what the original wheelbase was. There may be some  brake hardware left as you said you may need. Cowl lights come in handy. 

 I do see the hood hold down catches on his posting photo. Wow .. a nice looking spark plug cover!

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G'day,

 

For those that are interested, here are some close up photos of my original instrument cluster.

The "teal" colour is strong and not likely to be faded due to weathering.

The switch cluster is totally unusable due to the pot metal disintergrating, but you are still able to clearly read the screen printed paper face.

 

David.

20191215_114602.jpg

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On 12/14/2019 at 8:29 PM, 1924 6-55 Sport Tourer said:

G'day,

 

For those that are interested, here are some close up photos of my original instrument cluster.

The "teal" colour is strong and not likely to be faded due to weathering.

The switch cluster is totally unusable due to the pot metal disintergrating, but you are still able to clearly read the screen printed paper face.

 

David.

20191215_114602.jpg

20191215_121256.jpg

 

If you are sure that color is strong and original and not from weathering, I'm sure any paint supply store could match that color using modern tools and techniques so that the gauge faces could be refinished as original. 

Edited by 27donb (see edit history)
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27 donb,

 

You seem to be stuck on the fact that this "teal"colour is the product of"weathering".

 

If this colour we see today is the end product of nearly 100 years exposed to the sun and elements, what colour do you believe was it originally?

 

I am also curious how would you explain that 2 unlike materials - paper and steel - could end up the same colour after all this time ? 

 

My photos dont show the writing that well (due to the reflections on the glass) but if you zoom in you can still read the words quite clearly.

 

What i dont know for sure is, what gauge face colours were offered by Buick when these cars were new? Hopefully others out there can add to the discussion with either photos of their cars as fouund or literature from Buick. All i am showing is how my car presents today.

 

I too am sure that "any paint suppy store could match that color using modern tools and techniques so that the gauge faces could be refinished as original". Now, if only we new what colour it originally was.

 

Respectfully,

 

David.

 

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6 hours ago, 1924 6-55 Sport Tourer said:

27 donb,

 

You seem to be stuck on the fact that this "teal"colour is the product of"weathering".

 

If this colour we see today is the end product of nearly 100 years exposed to the sun and elements, what colour do you believe was it originally?

 

I am also curious how would you explain that 2 unlike materials - paper and steel - could end up the same colour after all this time ? 

 

My photos dont show the writing that well (due to the reflections on the glass) but if you zoom in you can still read the words quite clearly.

 

What i dont know for sure is, what gauge face colours were offered by Buick when these cars were new? Hopefully others out there can add to the discussion with either photos of their cars as fouund or literature from Buick. All i am showing is how my car presents today.

 

I too am sure that "any paint suppy store could match that color using modern tools and techniques so that the gauge faces could be refinished as original". Now, if only we new what colour it originally was.

 

Respectfully,

 

David.

 

 

No I'm not stuck at all, just supporting and responding to someone who is stating the color is strong and not from weathering.  If I had a strong original color anywhere on my car that was not faded from weathering, I would have it matched at a paint store to preserve originality.

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Not to get side tracked off the topic of instrument dash colors and what was or wasn't correct for 1924 i.e. black background with with lettering vs white background with black lettering. But I ran across some pics on an earlier post of an original unrestored Model 24-51 that was for sale and noticed the entire steering column and bracket were a teal color which reminded me of the previous discussion about the dash instruments on David's car being teal. The car in question appears to be in unrestored original condition, as one can see by the original patterned upholstery still on the seats, and other than the color of oxidization from copper? Does anyone have any ideas of why the steering column was painted with that color? Were these parts Nickel plated and it simply is the color of oxidization from the copper under the nickel? I wouldn't think that would be the case considering the condition of the rest of the car so is it paint? And if so, why was it painted that color? Just curious what others thought are.

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Edited by 29StudiePrez
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Somebody probably started working on the red & black 24-51 back in the 70's.  The hood has been stripped, red paint applied over the old paint with out much preparation, and steering column painted teal color.  Copper underplating on the steering column tube is not going to corrode such an even shade of teal thru the nickel plate.   The car may have even been running and driving in a few parades before returning to the barn for another 30 years of slumber.

Back to the original topic; below is a pic of speedometers showing yearly color changes. I believe the left unit with  white lettering on black background to be a 25, and right unit with black lettering on white background to be a 24.

25-24 speedo faces.jpg

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2 hours ago, Oregon Desert model 45 said:

Somebody probably started working on the red & black 24-51 back in the 70's.  The hood has been stripped, red paint applied over the old paint with out much preparation, and steering column painted teal color.  Copper underplating on the steering column tube is not going to corrode such an even shade of teal thru the nickel plate.   The car may have even been running and driving in a few parades before returning to the barn for another 30 years of slumber.

Back to the original topic; below is a pic of speedometers showing yearly color changes. I believe the left unit with  white lettering on black background to be a 25, and right unit with black lettering on white background to be a 24.

25-24 speedo faces.jpg

Interesting to see the difference between those two. Attached is a picture of an AC Delco Speedometer which is a 1924, not sure if there was a mid production year change or  the difference in gauges depended on Model cost, but an interesting design feature I noticed on this speedometer is a close up of the "Zero" mark shows the "Zero" is split in half with the "A" from A/C on the left side below the top half of the Zero and the "C" on the right side below the right top half of the Zero, then there is a line and below the "A" and "C" and under that line on both sides is what I think is the word "Buick", which is a little hard to make out due to age and wear, could be something else but makes sense since the gas gauge has the word "Buick" on the dial between the "0" and "F" Mark's. Can you turn the speedometer dial on your 1924 A/C gauge that you posted the pic of to see if it has a similar marker "Zero" split in half?  And to see what its saying in the center of the Zero? Not sure how many people have noticed these details on the dials.

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20191222_215718.jpg

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I have seen unrestored cars with the "Teal Oxidation Patina" on the nickel plated steering column and other nickeled parts.The spare, complete steering column/box and wheel I got with my 1925 master was exactly the same teal green oxidation. These parts were stored in a barn that had some cattle and fertilizer. Reaction to ammonia in the environment?

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Those tiny AC details on the MPH drum area really neat !  The paint is missing around the 0 area on mine so I was not aware of it.

Another change I noticed is on the ammmeter-oil pressure gauge.   Left face plate used applied decals for nomenclature (Buick, OIL, AMPERES), and the right face plate it has been painted on I believe by silkscreen. Red arrow is pointing at the decal edge.   On the back side, the mounting studs changed location.  I don't know if the decal was intended as cost reduction, or the silkscreen was a quality improvement.

"Teal Oxidation Patina" would make sense if the steering column had been the only part stored in the barn with cattle or fertilizer since none of the other plating inside that car was affected.

 

ammeter-oil pressure face plate.jpg

oil-amp gauge back.jpg

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