Brooklyn Beer

1931 Shock links and shocks

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If your getting into major rebuilding there are lots of specialized tools, but for general maintenance and some repairs, the tools listed in the original tool kit, or their modern equivalents  (including a feeler gauge and small ignition wrenches), will suffice.  A good grease gun and some modern grease fittings to match if your car still has the original non-locking grease fittings.  

 

There are some 19/32 inch "heavy hex" nuts originally used on the engine. A 5/8 wrench is a sloppy fit and will sometimes slip if the nuts are rusty. However, while not a standard size today, that size wrench and socket are still made and can be ordered online from some tool suppliers if you do a web search.

 

In addition to standard hand tools to carry onboard, a  truck-size heavy-duty scissor jack with a long-reach handle.  Hardwood block to use between the jack and the axle and a large 3/4 inch thick plywood one as a pad under the jack on soft ground. Plus a couple of pieces of 4x4 chocks for the tires. A 1/2 inch drive socket, extension, and long breaker bar make  a better lug wrench than the original.   Spare fuses, bulbs, and a couple of new ignition condensers (1950 Chevy 6 cyl.) in the glove box. And a new set of Champion 516 plugs, already gapped.

 

Paul

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)

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Paul, what I'm about to say is sacrilege and I apologize for saying it in advance. But,  15mm is a perfect fit for 19/32 whether socket or wrench. A lot of folks out there may have metric wrenches that may be quicker and easier to obtain than 19/32.

 

Bill  

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Now you've gone and done it, Bill.... ......  you've caused a fracture in the fractionals. :D 

 

Actually, I have several 19/32 wrenches and sockets that I've found for pennies at garage/yard sales. Quite common in their day, but now not needed for modern stuff so they get thrown in boxes with old "junk" tools.

 

Paul

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I never had any problems finding 19/32 sockets or wrenches. My problem was 21/32. Back in 1961 when I needed a 21/32  I found they didn't come with any sets of sockets and had to be ordered. Why would I need one you might ask? Well that's simple. That's the size of the nuts on Model A Ford connecting rods. Real fun trying to remove them with a Cresent wrench. Almost six decades and it's still burned in my mind!!!

 

Bill

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On 12/16/2019 at 8:41 AM, PFitz said:

One that I welded to a 6 inch socket extension bar and then ground with extra side clearance so it will turn the nut a bit further.  For the 1930 and earlier cages that have a lock nut inside the cage, I cut out part of a 7/8 inch box wrench, and then heated and bent the handle so it can reach in under the rocker arms.

 

That kind of looks like a spanner I still have from my time in the 1970s and into the 1980s working on Fiat agricultural tractors in New Zealand - bent into a particular shape so it could reach in under the fuel tank to split tractors apart at the clutch without taking the fuel tank off.

 

Roger

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3 hours ago, hook said:

I never had any problems finding 19/32 sockets or wrenches. My problem was 21/32. Back in 1961 when I needed a 21/32  I found they didn't come with any sets of sockets and had to be ordered. Why would I need one you might ask? Well that's simple. That's the size of the nuts on Model A Ford connecting rods. Real fun trying to remove them with a Cresent wrench. Almost six decades and it's still burned in my mind!!!

 

Bill

 

I was looking for a 19/32 socket online last night, and found Amazon selling a set of 3 that comprised

 

19/32, 21/32 and 25/32 for about $12.

 

https://smile.amazon.com/Craftsman-Piece-Drive-Point-Socket/dp/B01MZWMUH5/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=19%2F32+socket&qid=1576628892&sr=8-1

 

15mm is not an exact fit for 19/32 - I've got a 15mm spanner that won't go on some of the nuts on a Series 11A engine I'm taking apart - it's close, but not exact.

 

Roger

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It's true that 19/32 is .081 inches larger than 15 mm but most 15 mm sockets will fit 19/32 nuts/bolts, especially 12 point sockets. Spanners/wrenches are tighter tolerance than sockets except for box end spanners/wrenches which are a little more like 12 point sockets. Nothing, however, replaces doing the job with the proper tools. The three sockets you mentioned are the old time odd balls that keep rearing their heads with us individuals that insist on living in the past and working on ancient iron. Now, does anyone want to talk about Whitworth wrenches? haha

 

Bill

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Whitworth ?   Sure. Got those too.  Bought the last set that J.C. Whitney had back in the 70's when I got my 33 Austin.  Quite a surprise to see how big the Brit wrench is for that size marked on it.  :huh: 

 

Now,.... who's tool-crazy enough to have sets of both English and metric adjustable wrenches ? :P

 

Paul 

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)

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The toolset that I have here in the USA was purchased by me in New Zealand in the 1970s. It was a box full of SAE and Whitworth sockets, open ended spanners, ring spanner and other stuff. 

 

I added to it equivalents in metric to work on Fiat tractors and Japanese cars.

 

When I brought it over here in about 1994 (as checked baggage in the days before the airlines got all snitty about how much it weighed and how many you had) I left all the Whitworth stuff behind. A few years ago I salvaged that from storage and gave it to my brother in law and nephew. I also left behind the Whitworth adjustable, but did bring both the SAE and metric adjustables with me.

 

Roger

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yeah, after 3 Healey's, 2 Triumph's and one Jaguar I went through the whole gambit. The Healey 100 was Whitworth, the Healey sixes and TR's were USA SAE and the Jaguar, being in the 90's was both SAE and Metric.

 

Bill

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9 hours ago, theKiwi said:

The toolset that I have here in the USA was purchased by me in New Zealand in the 1970s. It was a box full of SAE and Whitworth sockets, open ended spanners, ring spanner and other stuff. 

 

I added to it equivalents in metric to work on Fiat tractors and Japanese cars.

 

When I brought it over here in about 1994 (as checked baggage in the days before the airlines got all snitty about how much it weighed and how many you had) I left all the Whitworth stuff behind. A few years ago I salvaged that from storage and gave it to my brother in law and nephew. I also left behind the Whitworth adjustable, but did bring both the SAE and metric adjustables with me.

 

Roger

How about the pliers, what did you do with those?

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1 hour ago, f147pu said:

How about the pliers, what did you do with those?

 

I brought them with me too, and the Vice Grips and hammer and punches - they were all of the Metric/SAE/Whitworth combination, so I figured that 2 out of 3 would justify United Airlines flying them over here for nothing.

I also brought my trolley jack in my suitcase on the same trip.

 

Roger

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