ron hausmann

1917 Kissel Model 6-38 US Army Truck - Light Troop Carrier

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Update June 8, 2020:

a. Rear tailgate/ladder has been built, reinforced, and tested by jumping upon it.

b. Front floorboards have been cut, fitted, and readied for vinyl and aluminum edge trim.

c. Handle placement has been started.

turning out very well!

Ron Hausmann

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

Looks even better right side up!

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As of June 14, 2020, I’ve attached much of the door hardware, hinges, and handles.

Also have built the rear drawbar and braces.

And, after a lot of painstaking cutting, planing, carving, and epoxying, have rebuilt the correct front awning.

I used unused pieces from my prior 1918 Kissel Sedanlette restoration to trim to become this awning. Very hard!

now on to engine and painting and fenders.

its starting to look very much like the pictures!

Ron Hausmann P.E.

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Really shaping up-  looks great- your hard work is paying off!  /Doug

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June 19, 2020, fender fitting underway.

also shown is a brass plaque from a true 1918 US Army Ammunition Truck for a body made by Heil Co. in Milwaukee.

Ron Hausmann P.E.

 

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As of today, June 24, 2020 -

1. Rear fenders have been shaped, stretched, and mounted. Some minor repairs to be done, but they fit. This s rare because Kissel fenders were mandrel-made and then best matched at the factory. Then they were stretched on with. Inch effort. Also, I had two good right rear fenders so I had to turn a right into a left by removing the interior mud guard. You now can’t tell.

2. Almost all compartment doors and hardware have been made and mounted. 
3. Steering column mounts have been installed. The long column weight and torque will be distributed on the cowl and top floorboard.
4. Seat design and dimensions relative to the steering column and pedal locations, has been done. The “fit” for the driver will be tight but quite comfortable! I might shorten the steering column shafts by 3”-4” to ,Abe it perfect but this might not be worth the three or four days effort. 
5. All driver compartment Floorboards and instrument panel box have been finished. See pictures. Because we have a flat one board cowl, it needed a hollow behind the instrument panel to house the speedometer body, wiring, etc.

6. Now will load up engine block and parts and take to St. Claire Engine, my Kissels engine rebuilder. 
7. Now will work on fitment of Front fenders. Once that is done, I can reliably measure the floorboard sizes.

8. Also located a replica French 75 cannon In rural France. This World War One Truck could function as a tow vehicle for Light field artillery And I’m debating adding a heavy hitch to do just that. And figuring out how much to pay for a fake cannon in France.

9. Now will start first coat painting and sanding of body. I have to be careful not to do too good a job since these trucks were brush-painted by drafted soldiers in Europe in most cases. And using field mixed paints of varying quality.

Here are pictures of a few more contemporary vehicles like mine.

Ron Hausmann P.E.

 

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Ron, the build is coming along great. As for the iron in France.......”Happiness is having a big gun!” 😎

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Full views as of yesterday. Fenders fit!

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Ron, this is really coming along nicely.  My only concern is the  fenders.  They seem awfully high compared to the period photos you’ve posted.  The rear wheel also looks to be too far forward in relation to the fender.  Not nitpicking as I do not have the talent or fabrication skills to take on a project like this.  Do you expect the truck to settle down once the motor and drivetrain are installed?

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I am sure it will be much lower with engine, gearbox and a bunch of Doughboys in the back. 🙂

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Very nice build, Sir. Those new springs will have to settle six inches to fill the wheel arches, though. Have you thrown a few bags of cement in her yet, to see how it sits? I don't wish to offend, but at the moment the gap between wheel and guard is a little too large, to my eye. I reckon it's in the springs, as the hangers look to be horizontal. As the weight goes on, the hangers may need a tweak with a lever to head them in the right direction. But looking at your other builds, I'm sure you're on top of this, anyway, so I'm probably teaching my Grandmother to suck eggs. Apologies.

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14 hours ago, Bush Mechanic said:

Very nice build, Sir. Those new springs will have to settle six inches to fill the wheel arches, though. Have you thrown a few bags of cement in her yet, to see how it sits? I don't wish to offend, but at the moment the gap between wheel and guard is a little too large, to my eye. I reckon it's in the springs, as the hangers look to be horizontal. As the weight goes on, the hangers may need a tweak with a lever to head them in the right direction. But looking at your other builds, I'm sure you're on top of this, anyway, so I'm probably teaching my Grandmother to suck eggs. Apologies.


bush - no offense .yes he rear fenders are too high. I will slice off the front 4-6” of both of them to bring the tops down. He rear ends of these fenders can’t be brought down because that would ruin proportions and interfere with grease fittings. They are correct fenders but the rear springs are higher, more sprung than a car. The tire in relation to the f3nder is correc5 for a 1918 fender. See 1918 Sedanlett3 picture.

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All -

   As of July 6, much detail work has been accomplished and body is nearing completion.

1. Both rear fenders have been cut down In the fronts to make up for the taller truck spring height. This has eliminated much of the open area above the tires and now they look like they should, not so high. Still need to make pe4manent mounts on sides of truck.

2. New under-seat gas tank has been pe4manently mounted and prepped. This is correct location for this style WW1 truck. Gas piping has been fabricated but won’t be installed until engine is in.
3. Front drivers seating covers have been finished. See pictures. There will be a small walkway in between the separate front seat springs To allow acces# from front to cargo hold.

4. First Aid cabinet above the front passenger shoulder has been completed and hardware applied.

5. Faux rivets At the rear step gate have been fashioned to disguise The modern Phillips screw mounts.

 

    This week, fenders and misc. parts go to sandblaster and engine parts go to Engine rebuilder

    Sanding and painting body wil now start in earnest

    Ron Hausmann P.E.

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Ron, I know the Phillips head screws weren’t around in 1917. You made the rivet covers to hide them. The question I have is would they have used rivets or straight blade screws? Thanks Mike 

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11 hours ago, Mike "Hubbie" Stearns said:

Ron, I know the Phillips head screws weren’t around in 1917. You made the rivet covers to hide them. The question I have is would they have used rivets or straight blade screws? Thanks Mike 


hey mike - they probably would have used straight screw bolts, but it’s easier to fill in Phillips crosses than to try to halffill them to look like old screws. I’m lazy.😎

thanks, Ron 

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I think they might have used carriage bolts. They were commonly used for purposes like that and I'm sure there are others here who have struggled getting them out when old and rusty.

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Had to post a picture of the truck that I took today with my beautiful wife Esther. She’s taking much more interest in this truck than any of my other cars, including the Kissel Gold Bug. Go figure!

Ron Hausmann 

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My Mrs. can’t stand my Pierce Arrows, but loves to go for rides in the 1915 T. Go figure.

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As of July 14, 2020,

a. Running boards have been cut, covered, trimmed with aluminum, and fitted to truck and fenders. If you have never fitted these types, it’s quite a challenge warping everything to work.

b. Rear fender mounting lips, 1” wide and covered with aluminum, have been created. These will make the out-to-out rear fender width the exact same as the fronts. That way the running boards remain exactly squared.

c. Rear fender interior metal tub skirts have been cut, painted, and mounted (green in pictures). Kissels did not have exposed wood on any fender interiors.

d. Rear fenders have been trimmed and lowered to accommodate higher truck springs. Now they have the same clearances as a 1918 Kissel car.

e. Bought paint. Am using rustoleum camouflage “1917 kaki”. If they say it’s 1917 camp color, I’ll take their word for it.

thanks. 
ron hausmann

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