ron hausmann

1917 Kissel Model 6-38 US Army Truck - Light Troop Carrier

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All - As of February 6, 2020, very much progress is being made. 
1. Frame has been sandblasted, powder coated, and readied for parts.

2. Front axle, steering mechanism, and wheels have been restored and mounted.

3. New rear springs have been picked up, pained, and mounted on frame. Had to buy a spreader to warp them on.

4. Rear axle, already restored, has been fished into springs. Needs to be shackled in tomorrow.

5. Frozen steering gear has been completely disassembled, figured out, polished and painted. Smooth as butter now.

6. Wheels have been repainted in flat WW1 green, as best as I could research.

RON HAUSMANN, P.E.

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Are you reusing the old driveshaft or having one made?  Also, when you paint the leaf springs, do you take them all apart, paint, and reassemble or can you just blast and paint them?  Looks good so far.

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Hey Gerczak,

im reusing the old driveshaft. These are husky Kissel rods with neat universals in cups at both ends.

on this chassis, I painted the springs as assembled, not apart. They are soooo stiff I’m not worried abou5 to much chipping as they flex.

i did have to buy a spring spreader to maneuver them onto their mounts. Never used one and they are great.

Ron

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I'd like to ask Ron if it hasn't already been, what product / type of paint do you use on the frame?

I would imagine it was quite rusty from all the years but looks like new now.

Thanks in advance.

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Dei - for all my restorations I have the chassis parts sandblasted and powder-coated in black. You can paint over the powder coating or just leave it as this one is. It’s not expensive and very durable.
thanks, Ron

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As of February 26, 2020, work is progressing on the framework for the truck body. I’m using premium red oak planking as originally, Kissel used Oak and ash. I’m reverse engineering the framework dimensions from the pictures which I have. See below. This work has highlited a number of problems with stiffness and clearances whichthe original designers must have dealt with.

Ron Hausmann P.E.

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Ron

 

Great project and nice work. 

 

Ed had a good idea on a wrecker project. Maybe in the works? 

 

Best

Charley

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Charlie,

At my rate of one restoration every 2-5 years, and with two definite jobs in front of me after this truck, my old body may not last long enough to get to a wrecker. I do all the work alone, including carving the oak, and that wreaks havoc on my joints.

we’ll see

ron 

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Framing for longitudinal seats - just like church pews.

Ron

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Fantastic work on the truck. Really interesting project. John

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Ron, you sir are truly a dedicated sole for all the time and effort you have put forth to keep the Kissels alive and rolling-   Thx!  Looking forward to your updates. 

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Here are cargo/trooper benches which make up the lower body of the truck. The front driver seat and cowl have not yet been added. All carved oak.

thanks, Ron Hausmann

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Looks good.  Impressive that you do this alone.  /Doug

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Starting to look like a truck as of March 18, 2020.

Ron Hausmann

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Ron, it looks like a Kissel factory! What is the wheelbase on the truck, and what is the carrying capacity? Thanks, John

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John S. - This light truck is being built on a Kissel Model 6-38 auto chassis, which has a 117” wheelbase and a Kissel-made 6 cylinder L-head engine. As a reference, Ford and General Motors WW1 light truck -ambulances utilized auto chassis rather than true truck chassis.   Based upon the 6-38 chassis capacity, this light truck should be a one - ton truck capacity. Ten troopers will be fine.

thanks, Ron Hausmann P.E.

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All - sorry to have omitted my updates for so many weeks. We are in SE Michigan and things are bad here with the virus. Two weeks ago I tested POSITIVE for coronavirus but seem to be fortunate with a less than severe case. If you are positive, they will keep you quarantined for three weeks, even though you are generally out of danger after ten days or so. To be safe.

     During this quarantine, after fighting off my milder symptoms, I’ve restarted some therapeutic light restoration work.’

     Pictured is an instrument dash plate for my Kissel. The 1916 Kissel dash plate is a beautiful pot metal casting. I’m us g that one. 1917 and 1918 Kissels used pressed metal dash plates. I chose to use a 1916 plate for my car because It was the least damaged and is probably the only one that exists anywhere. No one really knows the difference 1916 to 1917/18?except me telling you here anyway!

    My cast plate was split on its left side and missing its upper right corner. Today I built a precise form to recast these repairs and so far so good. I used JB Weld in a Saran wrapped form and you can see. It’s great.! After three days cure I can do some dremel work and it will be good as new once painted    
     Stay safe. This virus is bad! 
     Ron Hausmann 

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Hope your health news continues to be good. Zeke

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Ron, you are in  my prayers for a speedy recovery. Stay safe. John

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Ron, I am very pleased to hear that you only had mild symptoms of the coronavirus. It is good to see you back 'posting' again. Stay safe and look after yourself. Mike

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All - Getting back to restoration now that immediate danger is past! I tested NEGAT8VE for COVID19 on Tuesday, April 21 2020,after testing positive on April 1. 
    below are pictures of a 1917 Kissel model 6-38 Light Army Truck cowl, cowl framing and dash instruments casting. The casting rebuild described in post above is coming along well. Just in need of more cosmetic work. Look close.
    The cowl metal piece was tricky. I cut off the front end of an old car cowl. Try cutting a three-dimensional flared metal cowl completely flat! That new cowl piece required front and back framing to strengthen it. That framed cowl will carry the steering column, instruments, hood, and front framing which requires much strength and rigidity. I carved these pieces out out solid oak.

   More to follow. Ron Hausmann

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Starting to look like a light truck. Here are pictures today May 3, 2020

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Ron,

 

I have really enjoyed watching this project come together and how quick its moving along. It looks fantastic!

 

Best regards,

Terry

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