Jump to content

1917 Kissel Model 6-38 US Army Truck - Light Troop Carrier


Recommended Posts

All,

    Well I finished my 1918 Kissel Gibraltar Sedanlette and am embarking upon my next challenge - a US Army Truck.

    I have accumulated four - five Kissel Model 6-38 frames, engines, and parts over the last five years. Although I don’t have complete bodies for them, nor enough parts to do complete cars, I DO have enough parts to do complete Kissel light trucks with wood bodies. Kissel did make US Mail and US Army tricks but none have survived. Some were based upon car frames. Pictures of these have survived. 
   I am therefore going to build a 1917 Kissel US Army Truck, bodied as a troop carrier, using the below pictures as guides. I can also use Kissels contemporary sales pictures which sold complete chassis as guides. 
   Maybe this one can be done in two years! The last one took over five, but I built a big house at the same time.

   Stay tuned. 
   Ron Hausmann P.E.

CF7F6240-1553-4179-8F54-34234C451874.jpeg

6DF49FC5-4815-47A2-AAD2-70DBA9691356.jpeg

EECA7D1C-F3F2-4FCD-AC71-4BC3C1E70B4B.jpeg

71A6E3C5-4A66-40B0-9E0E-9EEBA553EBAA.jpeg

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

   Here is the first set of restoration pictures for this project from this week. 
   Frame selection and disassembly is underway. Unstacking car frames one at a time by one person with a shop crane is tricky. Need to keep cell phone on ones self in case of mishap. I’ve selected a complete 1917 Kissel frame which has its original vehicle number from 1917 on it. It’s rusty, very rusty, but all there including hard-to- find brake drums and mechanism. Will have to do ally of brakefree soaking to get parts off.

   I’ll also start sorting thru my Kissel parts stash to select pieces that will complete the chassis, hood, cowling, dash, etc.i have an unequalled stash of Kissel parts - useless to most everyone, but priceless to Kissel guys.

   Once disassembled, axles, frame, and many other chassis parts will be commercially blasted and black powder-coated.

   Ron Hausmann P.E.

AFA868F0-9596-4330-980F-CD58A15CA255.jpeg

A1E79DB9-595E-4919-9888-27CFD2FD2636.jpeg

8F717B33-D076-4A2D-9A3C-1D4A39B74A65.jpeg

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

All -

Here is the progress that has been accomplished As this new project has been started. It involves canabalizing several 1916 to 1918 Kissel Model 6-38 parts cars which I have, as many components in one frame are not as good as those in another. Ultimately the car will be a 1917. Chassis components and most other parts for Kissel Model 6-38 cars are the same except for bodies.

a. Rear axle has been disattached from its frame. It will be rebuilt.

b. Brake mechanical connections are being stripped from a different chassis.

c. Brake operating rods (unique to Kissel) from three cars have been sorted and best one selected.

d. Front axles from three cars have been compared and best selected.

e. Front axle spindles, springs, and steering and pitman arms have been sorted and best selected.

f. Spring shackles, special bolts, abs special washers have been stripped and buffed

g. Wheel bearings and special wheel nuts for Kissel axles have been refurbished.

h. Frame from original 1917 has been emptied of all connecting components.

    Next steps will be to start prepping these chassis parts for sandblasting and powder coating. And rebuilding the rear axle and machined brake components.

Ron Hausmann P.E.

DF3A1D78-4C1C-4F0E-A26B-1ED325E3BF25.jpeg

5BF16006-635A-45DF-B8CE-E746F21246E0.jpeg

5D2E940B-6036-4909-9FFC-25D1B4B9669D.jpeg

9DBADD98-7888-4569-ADCA-C0830B064486.jpeg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree. I for one will be following your progress on this project. Thank you, for both your workmanship and your recording of the work. Being from the other side of the pond, your previous posts have informed me about a make of car I had previously never heard of! Keep up the excellent work and posts.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

All -

As of first week in 2020, disassembly of chassis and many components is almost complete.

1. frame has been almost completely stripped of everything attached to it. Going to blaster/coaster next week.

2. rear axle has been checked and serviced by professional rear end shop and is being repainted.

3. front axle, spindles, steering arms, springs, shackles, and brake rods going along with frame to blaster next week.

4. brake mechanisms, unique to kissel, have been painstakingly disassembled and shined up.

5. rear axle bearings and seals have been carefully withdrawn and freshened up.

6. rare brake drums, bands, and wheel hubs  have been taken apart for painting.

7. rear springs will be new, truck type (heavier). They will be ordered next week.

8. research into precise details of wood body continues. Looks like US trucks in WW1 were a real chaotic mix !

Here are some pictures.  
Next week I go to California to pick up the remnants of a later 1921 Kissel touring car. Complete but no wood, disassembled.

thanks, Ron Hausmann P.E.

BD02AE10-A70F-43EC-9B7D-35037D79617C.jpeg

C7CAFB87-0B8C-4F64-A005-9A9497BF32AB.jpeg

EFA97C41-20E3-4DFD-ADB8-0B1B85948077.jpeg

91BD005F-1FFA-409F-851B-202644230B30.jpeg

5C0306AD-E273-4049-AB08-AD64C7745677.jpeg

C2BDFA99-CE96-4407-A230-F8FCB96474F7.jpeg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice project, reminds me of what we used to see 50+ years ago in HCCA and AACA magazines. I've noticed a lot of interest in WWI vehicles, just sold a set of T wheels to a fellow building a Ford Scout Car. Bob 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/12/2020 at 12:30 PM, 1937hd45 said:

Nice project, reminds me of what we used to see 50+ years ago in HCCA and AACA magazines. I've noticed a lot of interest in WWI vehicles, just sold a set of T wheels to a fellow building a Ford Scout Car. Bob 

 

Very true........it's unbelievable how many early brass cars today were put together from floor sweeping and a pile of scrap. Many of the "assembled" cars are now lost to history and thought of as correct. ALWAYS hire an expert....or two when buying a big dollar brass car. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

All,

Progress is being made. Tedious work refurbishing all the chassis and brake parts and fittings but nearly all done.

1. Rear axle has been overhauled and painted at axle shop.

2. Brake rods and fittings, front axle parts, front springs are being sandblasted and poweder coated.

3. new beefed-up rear springs are being made at Eaton Spring. Ready in a week.

4. painting of dozens of drive shaft, axle brackets, operating rod parts is done. 
5. Frame is completely stripped. Had to fabricate a new battery box as original sheet metal was ratty.
Now all I need to do is to get the frame powder coated. Will take it next week!

Ron Hausmann P.E.

8135BE81-AC08-4C9E-BFDC-70D3AF846533.jpeg

6FDA15BB-DA50-4492-B9BD-1F172AE5C8E7.jpeg

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

As of January 31, 2020, a lot of the tedious chassis parts work is done. 
1. Wood artillery wheels have been sanded and painted olive drab.

2. Rebuilt rear axle has been detailed and is ready to mount on the car.

3. Brand new rear springs have been made and painted. Also ready to mount.

4. Car frame proper is at blaster and will be powder coated. Pick up next week.

5. All the brake parts, suspension parts, and gas tank straps are blasted and painted awaiting mounting.

Ron Hausmann P.E.

09D531F6-C60F-440F-BCEF-CE9B09762D77.jpeg

3AF7D6D6-043F-405A-BEBD-A50C05A22E72.jpeg

B5839F01-D3D4-4F77-9FB2-F2AC1FEE56F6.jpeg

222888D9-E86E-44C2-A377-DE6AFD8962DD.jpeg

32CA201B-1A71-46F1-8643-F5714CA099EB.jpeg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you looked into the exact color for the period? I think what we call "olive drab" changed quite a bit between WWI and WWII. It may never have been all that consistent either.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

JV - yes I’ve done color research. Many if not most of those WW1 trucks were brush painted by troops using a recipe for field mixed green paint. That’s why there is a wide discrepancy in what WW1 colors were. Miss variations were many. In genera however, WW1 green was more light and more grey-ish than standard WW2 forest or drab green.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of the armies in WWI had service depots for light and moderate repairs close to the lines, heavy shops were further back. They tried to fix and save as much as possible, and did some very impressive repairs. Paint was certainly what was available at any location......and what any supplier provided......much of it was close......but taking down paint on WWI chassis’s clearly show multiple shades........no one cared back then, and interestingly most of the WWI guys today are of the “close enough for government work” attitude. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The SAE standard threads came about as a result of the problems the Motor Transport Corps had with repairs in WWI. Making nuts and bolts in the field was often necessary because of the wide variety of threads. After the war, the government insisted that future purchases for the Army must have a standard thread applicable regardless of the supplier.

 

My late Great Uncle, Sam Pendleton, belonged to the 310th MTC, a job he got because he knew how to drive which was a skill relatively few enlisted men had at the time.

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

All - As of February 6, 2020, very much progress is being made. 
1. Frame has been sandblasted, powder coated, and readied for parts.

2. Front axle, steering mechanism, and wheels have been restored and mounted.

3. New rear springs have been picked up, pained, and mounted on frame. Had to buy a spreader to warp them on.

4. Rear axle, already restored, has been fished into springs. Needs to be shackled in tomorrow.

5. Frozen steering gear has been completely disassembled, figured out, polished and painted. Smooth as butter now.

6. Wheels have been repainted in flat WW1 green, as best as I could research.

RON HAUSMANN, P.E.

9FEF0685-30F8-4270-9665-437635AC0AAE.jpeg

6D6CA3DB-FD4C-4874-881B-11227CF90529.jpeg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Are you reusing the old driveshaft or having one made?  Also, when you paint the leaf springs, do you take them all apart, paint, and reassemble or can you just blast and paint them?  Looks good so far.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Gerczak,

im reusing the old driveshaft. These are husky Kissel rods with neat universals in cups at both ends.

on this chassis, I painted the springs as assembled, not apart. They are soooo stiff I’m not worried abou5 to much chipping as they flex.

i did have to buy a spring spreader to maneuver them onto their mounts. Never used one and they are great.

Ron

2B09EA04-6128-4BF9-A45A-16ABE4EC8B79.jpeg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like to ask Ron if it hasn't already been, what product / type of paint do you use on the frame?

I would imagine it was quite rusty from all the years but looks like new now.

Thanks in advance.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Dei - for all my restorations I have the chassis parts sandblasted and powder-coated in black. You can paint over the powder coating or just leave it as this one is. It’s not expensive and very durable.
thanks, Ron

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

As of February 26, 2020, work is progressing on the framework for the truck body. I’m using premium red oak planking as originally, Kissel used Oak and ash. I’m reverse engineering the framework dimensions from the pictures which I have. See below. This work has highlited a number of problems with stiffness and clearances whichthe original designers must have dealt with.

Ron Hausmann P.E.

319E81CC-CAC6-4253-B94A-26EC24DA09B4.jpeg

5F36FC28-3300-4C1D-BEB4-9B3C22CDCFD6.jpeg

EB9CDB05-1D34-40E5-93DC-859383BD760B.jpeg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Charlie,

At my rate of one restoration every 2-5 years, and with two definite jobs in front of me after this truck, my old body may not last long enough to get to a wrecker. I do all the work alone, including carving the oak, and that wreaks havoc on my joints.

we’ll see

ron 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ron, you sir are truly a dedicated sole for all the time and effort you have put forth to keep the Kissels alive and rolling-   Thx!  Looking forward to your updates. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...