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How to install a really cool glass bowl fuel filter.


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2 hours ago, JFranklin said:

I haven't read it all but it looks like desolved varnish from the tank

 

 

Yeah varnish chelated with rust. But because the particle size is so tiny (because of the screens) it runs through the carb and the car runs great on it. Until it started sputtering one day but it cleared up.

 

That's why I put a filter on it as my winter job. But the car ran great the last time I drove it.

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 3 months later...

Today I started my 1917 for the first time of the season. Fuel filter worked great.

 

I found out that having a glass bowl fuel filter allows you to check out the operation of the vacuum tank. When the tank is sucking gas in, the fuel swirls around in the glass filter bowl. Then it stops and the gas just sits there for a long time. I had no idea how long the periods of time were for the vacuum tank being on, off, on, off. 

 

So, being the science geek that I am, I timed it. 

 

At fast idle, 13 seconds on, 1:55 off, then 14 seconds on, 2:03 off, then 13 seconds on.

 

Was very surprised, the tank is off most of the time, and on so briefly.

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On 12/18/2019 at 8:25 AM, Morgan Wright said:

Glass bowl fuel filters are a lot older than I thought, this is from 1926:

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DSCN3274.JPG

DSCN3275.JPG

 

Buicks came standard with "triple filters" in 1926.  Gas, Oil, and air.  The glass filter was attached after the vacuum tank.     Hugh

 

 1836634031_1926Buicktriplefilter.thumb.jpg.337ff10ae9fb1639a8323de75ee33b15.jpg

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51 minutes ago, Hubert_25-25 said:

 

Buicks came standard with "triple filters" in 1926.  Gas, Oil, and air.  The glass filter was attached after the vacuum tank.     Hugh

 

 

 

That allows the vacuum tank to get full of crud. Mine had 1/4 inch of rusty varnish at the bottom after using only one summer.

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Morgan, 

    There are 2 connections on the bottom of the vacuum tank (at least in 1925).  The low point center drain and the slightly higher connection that fed the carburetor.   The 1926 filter was connected into the high point take off that feeds the carburetor.  This way the vacuum tank acts as an initial dirt separator and does not require as many filter changes if managed as in the past.  For those of us without filters, the process was to drain the low point on the vacuum tank on some frequency to prevent a build up of solids in the vacuum tank that could make it to the carburetor.  In your cars case, the gas tank needs to come out for cleaning or be flushed because there is so much junk in it, it is overwhelming any filter system.       Hugh

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It was the junk in the fuel line, between the fuel tank and the vacuum tank. I cleaned out the gas tank 2 years ago. Today's gas has detergent and it loosened all the junk that settled in the 12 feet of fuel line. Because the gas tank and engine are both higher than the fuel line, it turns the fuel line into a settling tank for the bad gas they used in those days. Rust attaches to varnish and sinks in the gas.

 

The gas coming to the filter now is cleaner than the waters of Lake George.

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