Morgan Wright

How to install a really cool glass bowl fuel filter.

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What's cooler than a glass bowl fuel filter? You can see the sediment, and it fits in the category of modifications that don't affect originality, such as new tires, new battery, new safety laminated glass windshield, side view mirrors for safety, and even the extreme of front disc brakes, for safety. Nobody is against safety. These 100 year old gas tanks are full of rust and the fuel line is full of crud so nobody calls your car a "rat rod" if all you do is put in a really cool old-style glass bowl filter.

 

Here is how.

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Cut the tube where the filter is going to go. Most cars, the tube runs under the exhaust pipe and muffler, then under the rear wheels. Not a good place. Just put it in the engine compartment where it belongs. Then clean out the line with a gun snake, use the .223 caliber size.

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snake.jpg

Edited by Morgan Wright (see edit history)

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Not quite finite.

You need to paint the top casting red and then rub it with Scotch bright, so it looks like you stole it off dad's Farmall tractor.

 

Yea, I know it's not "hard plumbed" but it is just a temporary rig to see how it looks while I wait for my water pump to get back.

 

Mike in Colorado

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Great how-to write-up. Those glass bowl filters always vex me, but now I see that I have been putting them together improperly. Duh.

 

Also, invest in a good flaring tool. That Piggly Wiggly unit makes some ugly-ass flares. A good tool makes crisp, sharp flares without chewing up the tubing, and that will give you a better fit. Good tools always pay for themselves.

 

Thanks for posting this!

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It's my fault that it looks all chewed up. I bent the tube before I flared it, then I had to straighten it to flare it and then bend it back, it chewed up the tube a little.

 

FLARE FIRST, BEND LATER!!  is what I learned.

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Or if your car is older and has a vacuum fuel system you can just go to Tractor Supply and get a top inlet/side outlet glass bowl filter with shut off valve for about $15.00 and screw it into the bottom of your vacuum tank.  Mine works really well. When I stop the car I  close the shut off valve and let the engine run until it stops.  That way there is no danger of the carb. float bowl overflowing due to a stuck/leaking needle valve.  When you are ready to drive again just open the valve.  

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That's O.K. Morgan, copper is so easy to dent, and you know that you have to tighten the die bar down so the flare point does not push the tube out.

Steel tube does not ding so easily.

Fortunately the flare nut covers the die bar nicks

Your tool looks a LOT like my 50 year old Craftsman, but shinier. just keep the threads lubed with white grease and it will last forever. 

Thanks for the lesson...............

 

Mike in Colorado

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Been using glass bowl fuel filters for more than 50 years. This is the FIRST one I have ever seen where the gasket is at the BOTTOM.

 

So, suggesting, before installing the gasket; make CERTAIN where it goes on the filter you have.

 

Jon.

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1 hour ago, carbking said:

Been using glass bowl fuel filters for more than 50 years. This is the FIRST one I have ever seen where the gasket is at the BOTTOM.

 

So, suggesting, before installing the gasket; make CERTAIN where it goes on the filter you have.

 

Jon.

 

I wanted to check how much this filter resisted flow so I blew into it, into the inlet side. If I put the washer on last there was little resistance, you can blow right through it, but if I put the washer on first it was hard to blow into the inlet side. That might work fine for a car with a fuel pump, but for a vacuum system like this I want the least resistance possible.

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For originality at POF car shows that want preservation of original features, I'll just throw a sock on it. That would lead to an endless supply of come-back lines when people ask why I have a sock there.

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Edited by Morgan Wright (see edit history)

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What's the sock for?

It's a Christmas sock, I'm waiting for Santa

But it's July

I'm in no hurry

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Waiter there's a fly in my soup.

 

What did you expect for $2, an ostrich? 

Yeah we were all out of crackers.

Don't wave it around everybody else will want one.

That's ok mac, no extra charge

Yeah, those things are attracted to road kill

That's OK he won't eat much

Would you like a table for two?

He's going to have to pay the cover and minimum.

Really? I didn't think anything could live in that stuff.

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The Carter CARbureTER sediment bowl on my 1949 Super has a coiled spring in the bottom of the bowl with a porous ceramic strainer sitting on top of it. The spring keeps the ceramic strainer tight against the underside of the cap.  It uses a gasket between the top of the bowl and the underside of the cap to prevent leaks.  The gaskets are available from NAPA, regular size and large.  See my photo.  Interestingly, I have a Stromberg carburetor and a Carter sediment bowl. It is all original. Parts bin assembly, I assume.

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The filter you show is a Carter, and was available aftermarket at least post WWII, and possibly before. As far as I am aware, they were aftermarket only, but am not certain of that.

 

That particular one is fairly common; BUT MAKE SURE YOU A BOWL FROM AN IDENTICAL FILTER!!!! Carter had several aftermarket filters. I gave completely up on trying to sell parts for these things, and wholesaled 1/2 a truck load to a gentleman in Florida because of that. Watch Ebay for a complete filter. The key to the correct one is the wire going from top to bottom as in your picture.

 

The one shown by BuickBob is different from yours, and the bowl will not fit.

 

Check out Ebay 323832671374

 

Jon.

Edited by carbking (see edit history)
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The one I listed in the OP is the basic Speedway fuel filter, Walmart is getting $41 for it by linking you to Speedway who sells it for $40 and Walmart takes $1.

 

But this company is calling it a 1960-62 Chevy original part, and only wants $24 for it:

 

https://www.cjponyparts.com/fuel-filter-assembly-glass-bowl-chevrolet-c10-1960-1962/p/FG46/?year=1962&msclkid=f4d53a500a2e1b88766a67a1c2296a75&utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=New Bing Shopping Ads&utm_term=1101201852041&utm_content=All Products

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