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Lubrication for early Dodge Brother

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I am a proud new owner for 1921 Dodge Brother touring car (SN593324) and would like recommendations on modern day lubrication equivalents...crankcase, transmission and rear-end. The engine runs like a charm but leaks a little around the valve cover. I know these old cars leak but any recommendations to minimize the grease spots on my garage floor would be appreciated. Am also getting some leaks out the rear wheels. Respond here or via email rich.newman@omron.com

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when you say valve cover i assume you are talking about the lifter covers under the exhaust manifold.when new these didn't have gaskets from what i've heard and ussualy leak even with gaskets. most of the normal db venders sell new gaskets and can slow up your leak if not stop it altogether. maybe your car is just trying to mark it's favorite spot in the garage. make sure you don't get too frustrated putting the gaskets on because those covers bend pretty easily.

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My '24 leaks also. According to all my reading, these cars were designed to leak. I suggest you use cardboard, etc under the car where you park it.

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I've had a '23 for 11 years and run it about 250 miles per year. For lubrication I use the cheapest private label 30w detergent oil, which is far superior to anything available when these cars were built. Don't be fooled about "detergent oil" - it won't clean your engine, just keep a lot of fine particles in suspension. I change the oil at the end of the driving season each year. I would recommend that you drop the pan and clean the sump. These engines are legendary for having a heavy buildup of sludge in the bottom of the sump. The owner's manual recommends cleaning it annually. For the transmission and differential, I use the equivalant of 600w, which you can still buy from the mail order parts outfit in Sparks, Nevada.

Several years ago I got fed up with all the leaking oil, fuel, water, etc. around the engine, plus the transmission and differential leaks. I set out to stop all the leaks - these cars didn't come from the factory leaking like that!

I restored the fuel lines around the gas tank and below the vacuum tank, fixed the water and oil pumps, made gaskets for the valve covers (DBs didn't come with these!), got a correct gasket for the oil pan and fixed all the bolt problems, corrected the headgasket problems including correct torque of the head nuts, made a new gasket set for the carburetor, installed a new rear engine seal and make an effective crank cover gasket.

This effort cut out a lot of the leaking, but did not eliminate the leak from the bottom of the transmission housing or the rear end entirely. The trans bellhousing is vented at the bottom to allow excess engine oil, etc. to drain out before fouling the clutch operation and the differential has two lube holes filled with wickes that allow fluid to lube the brake linkage. The wickes disappear with age, but I have yet to actually find the holes although I can see the leaking oil. So I've come to an accomodation with my 80 year old DB and spread oil catching devices strategically under the car and wipe the underside periodically.

All things considered, DBs are still good for driving. Keep 'em Dodging. <img src="/ubbthreads/images/icons/smile.gif" alt="" />

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Thanks for the input. I am resigned to the fact that drip pans and cardboard will be required in my garage. I assume I will leak a little when I'm 81 also. I'll take your comments under consideration and proceed cautiously with repairs. The engine runs like a charm so I'm hesitant to invade and possibly cause more damage.

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