Walt G

They were just old cars - images of the era

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This is a photo my grandfather took at a CCC camp in Western Nebraska in the mid to late 30's.  There was some kind of tree planting ceremony that he also photographed.   The camp planted thousands of trees in what is now a state forest.  Grampa was the camp doctor.

 

12471885_10204118997013682_9211941332973392220_o.jpg

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On 12/3/2019 at 4:42 PM, edinmass said:


 

I’m in Florida so I can’t post photos. Pierce Arrow used a unusual type of wood joint through the entire car. No lap or but joints. It’s similar to a finger and groove with a taper, that was glued and screwed together and then reinforced with castings or steal brackets. Everywhere the wood came into contact with metal, they used a lead infused type of canvas between the wood and brackets, supports, vertical castings,ect........all done to prevent squeaks and rattles. The had the best in house coachwork of the era.........better than most of the custom shops. My all original 1929 didn’t rattle or squeak, had no wood or door issues. Have you ever seen a door hinge that had a grease fitting that was rifle drilled, cross drilled, and then has a ground channel on the surface of the door hung pin? The pin then went into bronze bushings that were pressed into the cast steel hinge. No one in the industry had anything close.......not even Rollston or Brewster. My all original one off 1933 LeBaron EDL with 33k on the clock that had fantastic storage since day one had rattles and squeaks in it...........and the car was their top of the line machine.

 

Ed, our original '29 has no body noises at all.

I need to address a slight creaking from the suspension, most likely time to service the spring shackles, but the body is amazingly solid.

Doors don't sag and still close with a solid click.

They really were an amazingly well built car.

 

Edited by zepher (see edit history)
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Install a new set of shackle pins, and dissassemble and lubricate the springs. Also, rebuild the shocks and linkage for them. The most common noise on a pierce is the side mount wheels or covers not being secured correctly. Otherwise, they are totally quiet. Be sure to get correct pins and bearings. At the same time check your steering linkage and steering box. Often the grease turns rock hard, and things are not working as intended. 

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On 12/2/2019 at 3:48 PM, Gunsmoke said:

These interesting photos were taken at a Baptist Church Picnic in about 1935/36, and include my Mom who would have been about 14/15 at the time (born  in 1921), she is sitting 2nd from left at passenger side, perhaps sitting on a side-mount? Car is I believe 1934 Pontiac. Can anyone imagine today letting 6 or 7 people climb on top of your 2 year old car! i believe the man shown in 2nd photo (a 2nd cousin of my Mom) is the proud owner, and it is his sister on the radiator in 1st picture.

Picnic2.jpg

picnic car 3.jpeg

 

Say...Peach isn't a common name. Any connection to Kenneth Peach, Jr. (1930-2006) from Southern CA in the 50s and 60s? He owned Spencer Tracy's guest house in Encino in 1959 and was listed as Cinematographer on a number of films.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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My Grandfather used the 21 Dodge as a tractor and powered his saw mill with the rear drivers side wheel. The 39 is still in the same condition as it is in the photo taken about 1951 and used often .

 

Dave

21 dodge 39 chevy.jpg

Edited by Dave39MD (see edit history)
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On 12/3/2019 at 8:26 AM, Walt G said:

Here is a Federal truck for all the people who like commercial vehicles , photo dates from 1940.

Nice truck. Don't think you could have that sign on it today.

 

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On 12/2/2019 at 10:18 PM, Tph479 said:

Just a $75 dollar used car in 1936 on its way out west.

F34FED69-EE7F-4FF3-9F6E-7B1956831DB0.jpeg

What's the body style?  I've never seen a Packard quite like that....

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3 minutes ago, trimacar said:

What's the body style?  I've never seen a Packard quite like that....

Looks like a 1932 Packard Victoria coupe....not sure maybe a 902 Model. This is the 900 Model....

1932 Packard.jpg

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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Wow, thanks, 50 years of collecting and I've never seen one....love it....

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jeff_a, the Peach side of my family came to Nova Scotia, Canada from the Eastern USA shortly after the War of Independence, about 1790-1800, as British Empire Loyalists. While I've traced their descendants since here in Canada, I have not researched their ancestors before 1800. I do understand it is a somewhat common British last name. Thanks for asking.

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Another period picture and a current picture of the same car. It is a 1932 Packard 900 coupe sedan. Four owners from new.  This body style was only used on the 1932 light eight model, and 1933 1001 model.

0BBFE25A-A866-453A-8E91-AC6D81384950.png

34D15816-F759-43BC-A60B-5B5086028EA7.jpeg

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One more for you to contemplate. I am not sure exactly when the photo was taken - most likely in the early 1940s? written on the rear of the photo is "reconditioned antique" and the location is Bayside, New York . Car is identified as a 1920 Stevens Duryea . I have never seen this car and would remember if I did and have been aware of and wanted to know what car was what ( year and make) since the 1950s. 749147321_Fo1920StevensDuryeaiBaysideNY001.thumb.jpg.dcd73de009f21387e6a27cf9081ba33b.jpg

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4 hours ago, Gunsmoke said:

jeff_a, the Peach side of my family came to Nova Scotia, Canada from the Eastern USA shortly after the War of Independence, about 1790-1800, as British Empire Loyalists. While I've traced their descendants since here in Canada, I have not researched their ancestors before 1800. I do understand it is a somewhat common British last name. Thanks for asking.

Thanks....the one I'm familiar with, with his dad, were in CA and OK as far back as 1904....so probably no connection. Extremely uncommon name in the States, though. In 60 years, I never heard that surname on anyone else.

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Walt

 

These are wonderful images we're enjoying greatly.  I hope you don't mind, but to improve the visible details, I use a shareware available for free from Irfanview.com.   In addition to cropping away the white edges, it has both automatic and controllable functions to darken or lighten the image and convert it to grayscale.    I recommend it. 

'20 Stevens-Duryea Bayside, NY early 1950's.jpg

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11 hours ago, Walt G said:

One more for you to contemplate. I am not sure exactly when the photo was taken - most likely in the early 1940s? written on the rear of the photo is "reconditioned antique" and the location is Bayside, New York . Car is identified as a 1920 Stevens Duryea . I have never seen this car and would remember if I did and have been aware of and wanted to know what car was what ( year and make) since the 1950s. 749147321_Fo1920StevensDuryeaiBaysideNY001.thumb.jpg.dcd73de009f21387e6a27cf9081ba33b.jpg

 

I'm not as well versed in nickel-era cars as most, but that looks like a Locomobile, doesn't it?

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I appreciate the tips to improve what I post, I am scanning the photos at 600dpi with an Epson scanner; Epson is the highest quality I bought and was and is used by the School of Visual Arts in NY City to reproduce artwork, images etc. What you suggest may be a better way to go but I am taking the time to do this between researching then writing major stories for a commercial car periodical, plus a lot of other things in life so right now , what you see is what you get, as it is all I have time for.  I do not have the time to fine tune every image I post even though I would like to. The photo of the Stevens - Duryea is a snapshot not an 8 x 10 photo and very gray in tone from the day when it was printed. Original size of photo is 4 1/2 x 3.

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Matt, the car has a emblem on the top front of the radiator shell - Locomobile did not do that, also the Locomobile shell I think was deeper ( I am working on a 1916-18 Locomobile radiator and shell now , polishing it and it is a big unit!) The hubcaps seem a bit smaller then what Locomobile used as well and I don't recall Locomobile using cowl lights. Just making all aware of what I studied before I believed what was written on the back of the photo to identify it!😯

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1 hour ago, Walt G said:

I appreciate the tips to improve what I post, I am scanning the photos at 600dpi with an Epson scanner; Epson is the highest quality I bought and was and is used by the School of Visual Arts in NY City to reproduce artwork, images etc. What you suggest may be a better way to go but I am taking the time to do this between researching then writing major stories for a commercial car periodical, plus a lot of other things in life so right now , what you see is what you get, as it is all I have time for.  I do not have the time to fine tune every image I post even though I would like to. The photo of the Stevens - Duryea is a snapshot not an 8 x 10 photo and very gray in tone from the day when it was printed. Original size of photo is 4 1/2 x 3.

Thanks for all your diligent work to bring these images to us to enjoy, it has to be a time-consuming undertaking.   Periodically, I'll subject an image to the improvement software and post it if a clearer image can be produced.    It surprises me the original Stevens-Duryea photo is that small given how nicely it sharpened and cleaned up.   One of the function lessens the high contrast found in many old images which with a bit of manipulation reveals details otherwise washed out.   I'll do what I can to help.   These looks at a period fast receding into the past are absolute gold.

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On 12/2/2019 at 5:05 PM, keiser31 said:

My other grandmother and her 1929 or so LaSalle convertible coupe...

 

Josephine Braun.jpg

Backtrack here:  This is a 1928 Cadillac (aka not a LaSalle).  28's have cowl parking lamps.  Also, notice the splash apron trim - not LaSalle.

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On 12/2/2019 at 5:44 PM, keiser31 said:

My great aunt Dorothy on her dad's big car...

 

Picture 2291.jpg

 

Looks like a 1911 Cadillac Model 30.

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On 12/2/2019 at 7:20 PM, JV Puleo said:

My Great Uncle, Sam Pendleton. Uncle Sam arrived in France about a week before the Armistice as a member of the 310th Motor Transport Corp. Because he was one of the last to arrive, he was assigned to the Army of Occupation and didn't get home until 1921. He always liked cars and was one of the few members of the family that owned them. I've no idea what this one is.

 

1018870066_SamPendleton1.thumb.jpg.c672c079ec1d56102544804c4f40a1de.jpg

 

401976512_SamPendleton2.thumb.jpg.cf50aeaca9cab18c425043288cd7cefc.jpg

 

 

 

1916 or 1917 Oldsmobile.

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58L - I REALLY enjoy sharing with all of you what I have collected over the past 50+ years. The cars, photos, literature, automobila is our common bond , it just makes us feel good and lets us savor the past that we weren't around to experience first hand. We all are little kids at holiday time when we view our own collection and are able to see something that someone else has saved that we hadn't seen before. Some people don't want to or can't share what they have but there are some of us that can. The focus is on all of us, not just ourselves. This was a lesson I learned very early in life from my parents and from very close friends like Austin Clark. Fortunately we have a organization like AACA to act as a venue for all of us to do this.

Edited by Walt G
typo (see edit history)
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45 minutes ago, Brass is Best said:

 

1916 or 1917 Oldsmobile.

 

That makes good sense. I doubt my uncle could have afforded a new car. This must have been just after he returned from France so late 1921 early 1922.

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