Jump to content

They were just old cars - images of the era


Recommended Posts

jeff_a, the Peach side of my family came to Nova Scotia, Canada from the Eastern USA shortly after the War of Independence, about 1790-1800, as British Empire Loyalists. While I've traced their descendants since here in Canada, I have not researched their ancestors before 1800. I do understand it is a somewhat common British last name. Thanks for asking.

Link to post
Share on other sites

One more for you to contemplate. I am not sure exactly when the photo was taken - most likely in the early 1940s? written on the rear of the photo is "reconditioned antique" and the location is Bayside, New York . Car is identified as a 1920 Stevens Duryea . I have never seen this car and would remember if I did and have been aware of and wanted to know what car was what ( year and make) since the 1950s. 749147321_Fo1920StevensDuryeaiBaysideNY001.thumb.jpg.dcd73de009f21387e6a27cf9081ba33b.jpg

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Gunsmoke said:

jeff_a, the Peach side of my family came to Nova Scotia, Canada from the Eastern USA shortly after the War of Independence, about 1790-1800, as British Empire Loyalists. While I've traced their descendants since here in Canada, I have not researched their ancestors before 1800. I do understand it is a somewhat common British last name. Thanks for asking.

Thanks....the one I'm familiar with, with his dad, were in CA and OK as far back as 1904....so probably no connection. Extremely uncommon name in the States, though. In 60 years, I never heard that surname on anyone else.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Walt

 

These are wonderful images we're enjoying greatly.  I hope you don't mind, but to improve the visible details, I use a shareware available for free from Irfanview.com.   In addition to cropping away the white edges, it has both automatic and controllable functions to darken or lighten the image and convert it to grayscale.    I recommend it. 

'20 Stevens-Duryea Bayside, NY early 1950's.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Walt G said:

One more for you to contemplate. I am not sure exactly when the photo was taken - most likely in the early 1940s? written on the rear of the photo is "reconditioned antique" and the location is Bayside, New York . Car is identified as a 1920 Stevens Duryea . I have never seen this car and would remember if I did and have been aware of and wanted to know what car was what ( year and make) since the 1950s. 749147321_Fo1920StevensDuryeaiBaysideNY001.thumb.jpg.dcd73de009f21387e6a27cf9081ba33b.jpg

 

I'm not as well versed in nickel-era cars as most, but that looks like a Locomobile, doesn't it?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I appreciate the tips to improve what I post, I am scanning the photos at 600dpi with an Epson scanner; Epson is the highest quality I bought and was and is used by the School of Visual Arts in NY City to reproduce artwork, images etc. What you suggest may be a better way to go but I am taking the time to do this between researching then writing major stories for a commercial car periodical, plus a lot of other things in life so right now , what you see is what you get, as it is all I have time for.  I do not have the time to fine tune every image I post even though I would like to. The photo of the Stevens - Duryea is a snapshot not an 8 x 10 photo and very gray in tone from the day when it was printed. Original size of photo is 4 1/2 x 3.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Matt, the car has a emblem on the top front of the radiator shell - Locomobile did not do that, also the Locomobile shell I think was deeper ( I am working on a 1916-18 Locomobile radiator and shell now , polishing it and it is a big unit!) The hubcaps seem a bit smaller then what Locomobile used as well and I don't recall Locomobile using cowl lights. Just making all aware of what I studied before I believed what was written on the back of the photo to identify it!😯

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Walt G said:

I appreciate the tips to improve what I post, I am scanning the photos at 600dpi with an Epson scanner; Epson is the highest quality I bought and was and is used by the School of Visual Arts in NY City to reproduce artwork, images etc. What you suggest may be a better way to go but I am taking the time to do this between researching then writing major stories for a commercial car periodical, plus a lot of other things in life so right now , what you see is what you get, as it is all I have time for.  I do not have the time to fine tune every image I post even though I would like to. The photo of the Stevens - Duryea is a snapshot not an 8 x 10 photo and very gray in tone from the day when it was printed. Original size of photo is 4 1/2 x 3.

Thanks for all your diligent work to bring these images to us to enjoy, it has to be a time-consuming undertaking.   Periodically, I'll subject an image to the improvement software and post it if a clearer image can be produced.    It surprises me the original Stevens-Duryea photo is that small given how nicely it sharpened and cleaned up.   One of the function lessens the high contrast found in many old images which with a bit of manipulation reveals details otherwise washed out.   I'll do what I can to help.   These looks at a period fast receding into the past are absolute gold.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/2/2019 at 5:05 PM, keiser31 said:

My other grandmother and her 1929 or so LaSalle convertible coupe...

 

Josephine Braun.jpg

Backtrack here:  This is a 1928 Cadillac (aka not a LaSalle).  28's have cowl parking lamps.  Also, notice the splash apron trim - not LaSalle.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/2/2019 at 7:20 PM, JV Puleo said:

My Great Uncle, Sam Pendleton. Uncle Sam arrived in France about a week before the Armistice as a member of the 310th Motor Transport Corp. Because he was one of the last to arrive, he was assigned to the Army of Occupation and didn't get home until 1921. He always liked cars and was one of the few members of the family that owned them. I've no idea what this one is.

 

1018870066_SamPendleton1.thumb.jpg.c672c079ec1d56102544804c4f40a1de.jpg

 

401976512_SamPendleton2.thumb.jpg.cf50aeaca9cab18c425043288cd7cefc.jpg

 

 

 

1916 or 1917 Oldsmobile.

Link to post
Share on other sites

58L - I REALLY enjoy sharing with all of you what I have collected over the past 50+ years. The cars, photos, literature, automobila is our common bond , it just makes us feel good and lets us savor the past that we weren't around to experience first hand. We all are little kids at holiday time when we view our own collection and are able to see something that someone else has saved that we hadn't seen before. Some people don't want to or can't share what they have but there are some of us that can. The focus is on all of us, not just ourselves. This was a lesson I learned very early in life from my parents and from very close friends like Austin Clark. Fortunately we have a organization like AACA to act as a venue for all of us to do this.

Edited by Walt G
typo (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, Brass is Best said:

 

1916 or 1917 Oldsmobile.

 

That makes good sense. I doubt my uncle could have afforded a new car. This must have been just after he returned from France so late 1921 early 1922.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My Moms family about 1938, my mother was not born yet, she was the youngest of 6.  The 1933 Graham stayed in the family till 1952?  Grandpa sold her when she was old enough to vote (21 back then?)...got her back in the family in 2001.

 

image.png.a000fba5182dafec08e03cf79cc45b13.png

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

One last photograph.

This was taken in France in 1934, I do not know the location. The car on the post is a Ford. The rear of the car in the distance that you see with the oversized trunk for the trunk rack was owned by the fellow that took the photo. That car is a 1934 Lincoln convertible sedan,owner was author John J. Ide an American who was an automotive journalist and frequent contributor to the magazine Motor Life & Motor Print.  I have several photos of the cars he owned  - more of the Lincoln, a late 1930s Bentley, and a 1920s Hispano Suiza limousine that he bought  in France on one of his numerous trips there - that car had a Kellner body. Ide would go over to attend the annual Paris salon /motor show.

I know some of you who may view this may think - wow, what a way to advertise the AACA annual Eastern Fall meet at Hershey , or perhaps to have it in front of the new headquarters, but perhaps I should stop comments right now!🙃

FordtonpostinEuropeIDE001.jpg

Edited by Walt G
typo (see edit history)
  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, keithb7 said:

Sure looks like an old mining town I went thru in 2010. Austin Nevada.  Anyone from there or been there, agree?

 

16ED3A17-A4AF-4C45-BB2F-81BFFBF993A9.png

 

Holy cow. I just zoomed in. Far left of photo, sign reads “Austin Cafe”.  

 

By chance I saw this image online earlier this year. I liked it.  It reminded me of Austin. As mentioned, I drove thru there in about 2010.  Stopped for lunch in a really cool old original wild west type saloon.

 

I remember the story the locals told me about the huge antique wood bar that they shipped in from Africa. Way back in the day...On a boat that went down around Argentina. The saloon is Cool spot. Be sure to check it out. Time seems to stand still at that saloon.  That may be the saloon  in the pic above. Late 30’s by the looks of the cars in the photo.  Still there today!

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/3/2019 at 9:26 AM, Walt G said:

My sincere thanks to all who have contributed to this post and also to all of you who are looking at it , I really appreciate and am amazed at the genuine enthusiasm and great comments ! It shows what all of you enjoy but perhaps don't get a chance to see enough of. SHARING THE WEALTH  - of our collections and interest in marvelous old machinery. I hope to add at least one or maybe two period images from my archives every week or ten days or so. Here is a Federal truck for all the people who like commercial vehicles , photo dates from 1940.

1940Federaltruck panel AA001.jpg

 

On 12/3/2019 at 9:29 AM, Dosmo said:

Wow - for me, that Federal Panel truck takes the cake.  Outstanding! 

 

 

According to the livery, it takes the bread.  😁  Maybe not a PC brand of cargo but a cool truck.

Edited by CHuDWah (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/4/2019 at 10:06 AM, TerryB said:

The photo of the car, the bill of sale and accessories purchased.  From a collection given to me by a late friend.

 

03A726AF-0BE4-4CC0-925D-A9FCD3A9235E.jpeg

66F9357F-C3C3-42F9-B48A-D0527CFE5D5D.jpeg

8D24395E-2C0F-4A6F-BD1E-C8FA9469564D.jpeg

 

On 12/4/2019 at 10:30 AM, Walt G said:

Terry

This is great , I wonder if the building that that Chevrolet dealership was located in still exists in essentially the same format/look it had then.

Walt

 

 

Mr Shue traded a Ford for a CHEVY??!!  :o  I assume the Dunlop tire/tube was the spare but what's a "Weed" bumper?  Brand name?  Or given the location of the picture, maybe it really was for bumping weeds.  🤣

 

Anyway, I didn't find any pix of the dealership, then or now.  But Longenecker was quite the entrepreneur.  Here he is in the Marion-Handley he drove from the factory in Jackson MI - apparently he was a distributor for the make as well as several others.

 

70064257_1486401261.jpg

 

And here he is with his Scripps-Booth "Road-O-Plane".  It was built as a non-flying parade float but some folks, thinking it was real, contacted him wanting to buy or build one.  🤣

 

LR20170216_CoryRoadOPlane-1.jpg

 

More info on J F - https://lititzrecord.com/news/john-longenecker-road-o-plane/

Edited by CHuDWah (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, CHuDWah said:

but what's a "Weed" bumper?  Brand name?  Or given the location of the picture, maybe it really was for bumping weeds.  🤣

 

 Yes, a brand name. Weed is best known today (well, a few years back?) for Weed Tire Chains. Back in the 1920s, they manufactured not only tire chains, but quite an assortment of automotive accessories. These were sold both after-market in automotive stores and directly to automobile manufacturers for either optional or standard equipment. Accessories included but were not limited to shock absorbers and bumpers. Although it does not have the Weed name on it, research some years back, I found that the bumpers on my '27 Paige were Weed bumpers. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I keep saying "one last" image, well... This image is not the best but it was the only thing I could get. It is a small photo that I found tacked to a wall in a local locksmith/key place and although I couldn't borrow the photo to scan the business owner did make me a photo copy of it which is what you see here. I mentioned to him what make and model it was and he had never heard of it.

1655945766_willys77panel001.thumb.jpg.5c8de143a572daf3d479cafcbeff5fe9.jpg

 

It is the only period photo of a Willys 77  I have managed to locate in many years of looking at a lot of period photos.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Ben, always nice to learn something new about people that were in the hobby years ago. The Brindle Crane Simplex lived two towns over in New Cannan, Ct.  for years, with a new restoration it is now in the Jay Leno garage. Bob 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...