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They were just old cars - images of the era


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1 hour ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

I agree that this isn't the Hershey show.  With certainty, it was taken before

1936, and most likely in the late 1910's or early 1920's when those cars

were in regular use:

---The parking area, as previously noted, is unmown.

---The cars aren't bright and shiny, and some have the dullness of regular use.

---The style of the "Hershey's Cocoa" sign is not of 1955, but much earlier.

---The building (Convention Hall) had a large addition (the Hershey Arena)

in 1936, and the addition is not present in the picture.

---The clothing isn't that of 1955.  Some people at 1955 car shows dressed

in old-style clothing, but not everyone!  I see a straw hat and men in dark suits

and hats that are not of 1955 style.

 

Yes, I was kidding about it being AACA.  It is a 1920s gathering at Hershey for a program at the theatre in the background .

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My sincere thanks to all who have contributed to this post and also to all of you who are looking at it , I really appreciate and am amazed at the genuine enthusiasm and great comments ! It shows what all of you enjoy but perhaps don't get a chance to see enough of. SHARING THE WEALTH  - of our collections and interest in marvelous old machinery. I hope to add at least one or maybe two period images from my archives every week or ten days or so. Here is a Federal truck for all the people who like commercial vehicles , photo dates from 1940.

1940Federaltruck panel AA001.jpg

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1 hour ago, trimacar said:

The car being crushed is a circa 1911 Stoddard Dayton limousine, 50 horsepower (can tell by the 14 spokes on rear wheel)…..

 

Here is an early shot of the Stoddard Dayton. Bob   https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=1917+tank+crushes+car&docid=607992258313326137&mid=D166F9D80115D027108ED166F9D80115D027108E&view=detail&FORM=VIRE

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Ed

Was that Pierce-Arrow Twelve phaeton body an in-house job or by Brunn or Willoughby?   I recall a small photo of it in any early SIA magazine at a meet, maybe Watkins Glen races.

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3 hours ago, Dosmo said:

For a short period of time in the mid 1920s, my maternal grandfather drove a taxi carrying passengers between Gatlinburg, Elkmont & Sevierville in East Tennessee.  Circa 1927, here is a photo of him & my mother standing next to the family's 1920s car (we have always heard this was a Buick) with the taxi signs mounted on top.

Glenn & Betty 0002 copy.jpg

From the style of the drum headlight it appears to be a 1923 Buick model 45.

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OK not a car, but my Grandfathers first transportation, that was not a horse.  He told me he would do doughnuts in the town square to show off for the girls.  After a visit from the town constable threatening to put him in jail next time, the Indian was retired to the barn. 

 

I think it is a 1914 Indian Twin, two speed?

 

1104493325_GrandpaBeiderwolfabout1920.thumb.jpg.e96c3006c345dfdbc4174ab5d3f8b7d1.jpg

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2 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Ed

Was that Pierce-Arrow Twelve phaeton body an in-house job or by Brunn or Willoughby?   I recall a small photo of it in any early SIA magazine at a meet, maybe Watkins Glen races.


Factory in house job.......but a factory Pierce body was usually better construction than 90 percent of the custom shops. They built three special 7passenger touring cars for FDR.........one is still with us.......I tried to buy it twenty years ago, but that’s another story. Sadly, it’s no longer in the US.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Ed

 

Would you please elaborate on what methods, materials and details that made Pierce-Arrow's body construction superior to contemporary makes.

 

Glad to know at least one of the three special phaetons still is extant.  Sorry to hear it is no longer in the U.S. given its historical significance. 

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My Dad's 1st car taken at the farm with his dog Peg.

 

He nick named the car his "Cuddle Buggy".

When he cruised Up Town and came across the girls and they wanted a ride, he would say, "No cuddle, no buggy".

He cut that out by the time he met my mother. hahaha

566149648_1926ModelT-TheCuddleBuggy-1941.thumb.jpg.0b7f57482a712e39dc50ffcee0a290d7.jpg

 

Same car with his buddies in front of the High School.

361683104_CCF06022015-Copy2.thumb.jpg.e16f25fbf5c7a180350320c71a74a7bf.jpg

 

 

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43 minutes ago, 1937hd45 said:

Wonder what the rest of the story is with this Hupmobile. Bob 

3 5 1.jpg

The radiator and tire shields shows up on prohibition-era police cars used to fight organized crime, presumably anticipating shoot-outs.  The Hupmobile looks to be a 1930-'31 Model H phaeton with body by Raulang.  Note the sweeping cut-line on the front door.    They were powered by a 133 hp, 365 ci straight eight.  The driver appears to be in police uniform.

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52 minutes ago, 1937hd45 said:

Wonder what the rest of the story is with this Hupmobile. Bob 

3 5 1.jpg

Looks like armor plating. Windshield looks like it might be bullet proof as well.  Looks like a gunport even. Top is probably armored underneath as well. 

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Another of my great uncles... Bob Pendleton. In his 20s he was the chauffeur for a wealthy family in New London, Connecticut. He drove this Locomobile...

 

1839766592_UncleBobbigcar.thumb.jpg.d50f92e5f13426163b98ca39bfc3c556.jpg

 

The family also bought this runabout for him to do minor errands...

 

63802655_UncleBob.thumb.jpg.a765bc1e02ed36381d401e29c3cb39d7.jpg

 

I think its an early Hudson but could be wrong.

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2 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Ed

 

Would you please elaborate on what methods, materials and details that made Pierce-Arrow's body construction superior to contemporary makes.

 

Glad to know at least one of the three special phaetons still is extant.  Sorry to hear it is no longer in the U.S. given its historical significance. 


 

I’m in Florida so I can’t post photos. Pierce Arrow used a unusual type of wood joint through the entire car. No lap or but joints. It’s similar to a finger and groove with a taper, that was glued and screwed together and then reinforced with castings or steal brackets. Everywhere the wood came into contact with metal, they used a lead infused type of canvas between the wood and brackets, supports, vertical castings,ect........all done to prevent squeaks and rattles. The had the best in house coachwork of the era.........better than most of the custom shops. My all original 1929 didn’t rattle or squeak, had no wood or door issues. Have you ever seen a door hinge that had a grease fitting that was rifle drilled, cross drilled, and then has a ground channel on the surface of the door hung pin? The pin then went into bronze bushings that were pressed into the cast steel hinge. No one in the industry had anything close.......not even Rollston or Brewster. My all original one off 1933 LeBaron EDL with 33k on the clock that had fantastic storage since day one had rattles and squeaks in it...........and the car was their top of the line machine.

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6 minutes ago, edinmass said:


 

I’m in Florida so I can’t post photos. Pierce Arrow used a unusual type of wood joint through the entire car. No lap or but joints. It’s similar to a finger and groove with a taper, that was glued and screwed together and then reinforced with castings or steal brackets. Everywhere the wood came into contact with metal, they used a lead infused type of canvas between the wood and brackets, supports, vertical castings,ect........all done to prevent squeaks and rattles. The had the best in house coachwork of the era.........better than most of the custom shops. My all original 1929 didn’t rattle or squeak, had no wood or door issues. Have you ever seen a door hinge that had a grease fitting that was rifle drilled, cross drilled, and then has a ground channel on the surface of the door hinge pin? The pin then went into bronze bushings that were pressed into the cast steel hinge. No one in the industry had anything close.......not even Rollston or Brewster. My all original one off 1933 LeBaron EDL with 33k on the clock that had fantastic storage since day one had rattles and squeaks in it...........and the car was their top of the line machine.


Another detail, the brake can clutch pedal on a pierce rotate on a shaft on the side of the transmission, and they have grease cups for lubrication..............only difference is a Pierce Arrow has Torrington roller bearings that the pedals rotate on.......not bushings like Rolls Royce, or bare steel on steel like most cars. Then again, a Pierce 12 has roller bearings in the distributor also......no bushings. I could go on.........

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, JV Puleo said:

Another of my great uncles... Bob Pendleton. In his 20s he was the chauffeur for a wealthy family in New London, Connecticut. He drove this Locomobile...

 

1839766592_UncleBobbigcar.thumb.jpg.d50f92e5f13426163b98ca39bfc3c556.jpg

 

The family also bought this runabout for him to do minor errands...

 

63802655_UncleBob.thumb.jpg.a765bc1e02ed36381d401e29c3cb39d7.jpg

 

I think its an early Hudson but could be wrong.

Yep....about a 1909 or 1910 Hudson.

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This is one of my favorite early photos in my collection.  It shows an unknown car parked in front of the Robert Holmes Garage. I like it because the sign painted on the wall advertises Steam, Electric, and Gasoline Automobiles. 

If you know the car and location, don't hesitate to chime in.  Could it be a Winton?

Terry

image.png

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1 hour ago, Terry Bond said:

This is one of my favorite early photos in my collection.  It shows an unknown car parked in front of the Robert Holmes Garage. I like it because the sign painted on the wall advertises Steam, Electric, and Gasoline Automobiles. 

If you know the car and location, don't hesitate to chime in.  Could it be a Winton?

Terry

image.png

Looks to be a 1905 Winton A.

1905 Winton.jpg

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, edinmass said:


Another detail, the brake can clutch pedal on a pierce rotate on a shaft on the side of the transmission, and they have grease cups for lubrication..............only difference is a Pierce Arrow has Torrington roller bearings that the pedals rotate on.......not bushings like Rolls Royce, or bare steel on steel like most cars. Then again, a Pierce 12 has roller bearings in the distributor also......no bushings. I could go on.........

Ed

Thanks for elaborating on the details that made their construction methods superior.  Was this true right through to the last car?

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Here is a friend and his wife pictured in 1941

with their 1936 Oldsmobile;  and, interestingly,

the same pose in current times.  He still owns and

drives the car which he acquired new in December

of 1935.

 

"Then and Now" pictures can be especially interesting.

 

 

Irenee and Barbara 1941.jpg

Irenee and Barbara 2009.jpg

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This is a photo my grandfather took at a CCC camp in Western Nebraska in the mid to late 30's.  There was some kind of tree planting ceremony that he also photographed.   The camp planted thousands of trees in what is now a state forest.  Grampa was the camp doctor.

 

12471885_10204118997013682_9211941332973392220_o.jpg

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On 12/3/2019 at 4:42 PM, edinmass said:


 

I’m in Florida so I can’t post photos. Pierce Arrow used a unusual type of wood joint through the entire car. No lap or but joints. It’s similar to a finger and groove with a taper, that was glued and screwed together and then reinforced with castings or steal brackets. Everywhere the wood came into contact with metal, they used a lead infused type of canvas between the wood and brackets, supports, vertical castings,ect........all done to prevent squeaks and rattles. The had the best in house coachwork of the era.........better than most of the custom shops. My all original 1929 didn’t rattle or squeak, had no wood or door issues. Have you ever seen a door hinge that had a grease fitting that was rifle drilled, cross drilled, and then has a ground channel on the surface of the door hung pin? The pin then went into bronze bushings that were pressed into the cast steel hinge. No one in the industry had anything close.......not even Rollston or Brewster. My all original one off 1933 LeBaron EDL with 33k on the clock that had fantastic storage since day one had rattles and squeaks in it...........and the car was their top of the line machine.

 

Ed, our original '29 has no body noises at all.

I need to address a slight creaking from the suspension, most likely time to service the spring shackles, but the body is amazingly solid.

Doors don't sag and still close with a solid click.

They really were an amazingly well built car.

 

Edited by zepher (see edit history)
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Install a new set of shackle pins, and dissassemble and lubricate the springs. Also, rebuild the shocks and linkage for them. The most common noise on a pierce is the side mount wheels or covers not being secured correctly. Otherwise, they are totally quiet. Be sure to get correct pins and bearings. At the same time check your steering linkage and steering box. Often the grease turns rock hard, and things are not working as intended. 

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On 12/2/2019 at 3:48 PM, Gunsmoke said:

These interesting photos were taken at a Baptist Church Picnic in about 1935/36, and include my Mom who would have been about 14/15 at the time (born  in 1921), she is sitting 2nd from left at passenger side, perhaps sitting on a side-mount? Car is I believe 1934 Pontiac. Can anyone imagine today letting 6 or 7 people climb on top of your 2 year old car! i believe the man shown in 2nd photo (a 2nd cousin of my Mom) is the proud owner, and it is his sister on the radiator in 1st picture.

Picnic2.jpg

picnic car 3.jpeg

 

Say...Peach isn't a common name. Any connection to Kenneth Peach, Jr. (1930-2006) from Southern CA in the 50s and 60s? He owned Spencer Tracy's guest house in Encino in 1959 and was listed as Cinematographer on a number of films.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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