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They were just old cars - images of the era


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 OK, here we go again. Since I started the thread that featured classic cars with photos taken post war (but are 50 to 70 years old now since they were taken) I thought it would be nice to have one on all sorts of pre World War vehicles , not just luxury vehicles. By "cars" in the title lets also include trucks in that. Let's see what photographs you have, taken pre-WWII only.

 

Thanks to my friend Greg Wells that came up with a suggestion for the title. So here we go again. Since our fine AACA magazine has only so much room in each issue, we will locate some fun stuff here. Please comment and contribute!

 

Thanks everyone.

 

Walt

 

19  MACKmodelACBulldogfront  AA004.jpg

 

 Daniels1923001.jpg

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The cycle-fendered roadster is a Daniels, made in Reading, Pa.  

 

I think the photo came from the Nassau County police files, as the car I believe was used in a robbery.

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Here is a picture of our grandpa Findlay in his 1927 International truck. He hauled fruit up and down the very steep hills of British Columbia's Okanagan region. When he got this truck he thought it was the greatest because he could carry 100 boxes of apples in a load. Then the next year they came out with front wheel brakes...

 

Peter

 

Grandpa Findlay's 1927 International.jpg

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These interesting photos were taken at a Baptist Church Picnic in about 1935/36, and include my Mom who would have been about 14/15 at the time (born  in 1921), she is sitting 2nd from left at passenger side, perhaps sitting on a side-mount? Car is I believe 1934 Pontiac. Can anyone imagine today letting 6 or 7 people climb on top of your 2 year old car! i believe the man shown in 2nd photo (a 2nd cousin of my Mom) is the proud owner, and it is his sister on the radiator in 1st picture.

Picnic2.jpg

picnic car 3.jpeg

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Hey Dodge panel re the photographer of the Mack AC bulldog truck. That photo doesn't say on the back who took it but I also have a side view of a similar  truck in another view ( it was a rack truck and sheet metal was a lighter color but for same oil company ) and the photographer is listed as Chase Commercial Photographer, Newark, Ohio.  The rack, wheels , chassis and cab have elaborate pin striping as well, absolutely superb work . I can't imagine how long it took to stripe that truck when it was new. there is also the name The Wyete Company, Newark, Ohio as well stamped on the back of the photo. My guess is that the truck was used there in that location.

Walt

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1 hour ago, keiser31 said:

My other Grandmother and her 1929 or so LaSalle convertible coupe....

Josephine Braun.jpg

I'm curious about this photo & the year. Was it before or after the "crash"? Stock market, not car. The reason is after the crash, people people went from comfortable/well to do, to paupers & in some cases overnight. Now a LaSalle isn't the most expensive car one could buy then, but that along with the fur coat just strikes me as curious for the time. 

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My Great Uncle, Sam Pendleton. Uncle Sam arrived in France about a week before the Armistice as a member of the 310th Motor Transport Corp. Because he was one of the last to arrive, he was assigned to the Army of Occupation and didn't get home until 1921. He always liked cars and was one of the few members of the family that owned them. I've no idea what this one is.

 

1018870066_SamPendleton1.thumb.jpg.c672c079ec1d56102544804c4f40a1de.jpg

 

401976512_SamPendleton2.thumb.jpg.cf50aeaca9cab18c425043288cd7cefc.jpg

 

 

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16 hours ago, George Smolinski said:

I'm curious about this photo & the year. Was it before or after the "crash"? Stock market, not car. The reason is after the crash, people people went from comfortable/well to do, to paupers & in some cases overnight. Now a LaSalle isn't the most expensive car one could buy then, but that along with the fur coat just strikes me as curious for the time. 

Apparently, my paternal Grandfather & Grandmother, whom I never met were wealthy. They owned Braun Lumber Corporation and sold wood to the car companies in and around Michigan. Just prior to WWll, my Grandfather bought up all of the coal they could and pretty much had the market on it during the war. They remained wealthy until their demise. I was looking through some old car photos I had, looking for some 1931 Chryslers for a guy and found this. It is the cover of the WPC Club newsletter and I had it for years. When I scanned it for the guy, I noticed the BRAUN LUMBER sign across the street in Detroit. The ship is the J.T.Wing that my Grandfather owned and used to ship lumber on the Great Lakes. It was the last 3 masted wood vessel to traverse the Great Lakes as a commercial vessel. I think it was used to bootleg whiskey from Canada, too.

lumber ship JT Wing.jpg

Braun Lumber photo.jpg

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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13 minutes ago, JV Puleo said:

My Great Uncle, Sam Pendleton. Uncle Sam arrived in France about a week before the Armistice as a member of the 310th Motor Transport Corp. Because he was one of the last to arrive, he was assigned to the Army of Occupation and didn't get home until 1921. He always liked cars and was one of the few members of the family that owned them. I've no idea what this one is.

 

1018870066_SamPendleton1.thumb.jpg.c672c079ec1d56102544804c4f40a1de.jpg

 

401976512_SamPendleton2.thumb.jpg.cf50aeaca9cab18c425043288cd7cefc.jpg

 

 

That is a 1921-23 Oldsmobile.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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OP of edinmass seems to have smaller rear window, smaller rear door dogleg, suggesting perhaps a smaller model Buick? 31-50 Sedan for example  or it could just be distortion of one photo or the other. My guess is one is longer wheelbase than the other. Buick offerings had 114" (model 50), 118" (model 60), 124" (model 80) and 132" (model 90) Wheelbases. or Marquette perhaps?

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First image is of my great grandfather Lawrence Halter (to the left holding the bundle) and his car in Akron, Ohio. City Laundry was his business. I posted this a long time ago and I don't believe I got a definitive identification on that car. The second photo has great grandfather in the rumble seat behind Chief Pontiac and my grandfather Edward Hetzel standing far right. This forum identified this car as a 1928 Oakland.

post-153309-0-27154000-1450902344_thumb.jpeg

post-153309-0-29723600-1450903174_thumb.jpg

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55 minutes ago, TerryB said:

I think this was the first AACA gathering at Hershey 😀. From a collection of photographs given to me by a friend.  Note the Hershey sign in the background.

 

8EEAFABD-F101-4BF0-B8F6-DEFBCC2C5A48.jpeg

 

Interesting picture Terry, but I don't remember any show fields that were not mowed nor that were that close to a building, other than the stadium.

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10 hours ago, edinmass said:

This one will separate the men from the boys......give an EXACT identification.............exact.

F40BD0C6-ED0F-4C66-9302-1B56694759A1.png


 

 

This one is a FULL CCCA Classic.........and it’s not what it appears. I’ll admit this one is ridiculously difficult, and I was not aware of it’s existence  until I spoke to a guy working on one. It’s a Doble steam car, Model F. Apparently they built three of them, and they used a Buick platform for them. Not sure if they ordered a new car and converted it, or special ordered a car without an engine and driveline. 

 

 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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10 hours ago, TerryB said:

I think this was the first AACA gathering at Hershey 😀. From a collection of photographs given to me by a friend.  Note the Hershey sign in the background.

 

8EEAFABD-F101-4BF0-B8F6-DEFBCC2C5A48.jpeg

 

I agree that this isn't the Hershey show.  With certainty, it was taken before

1936, and most likely in the late 1910's or early 1920's when those cars

were in regular use:

---The parking area, as previously noted, is unmown.

---The cars aren't bright and shiny, and some have the dullness of regular use.

---The style of the "Hershey's Cocoa" sign is not of 1955, but much earlier.

---The building (Convention Hall) had a large addition (the Hershey Arena)

in 1936, and the addition is not present in the picture.

---The clothing isn't that of 1955.  Some people at 1955 car shows dressed

in old-style clothing, but not everyone!  I see a straw hat and men in dark suits

and hats that are not of 1955 style.

 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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For a short period of time in the mid 1920s, my maternal grandfather drove a taxi carrying passengers between Gatlinburg, Elkmont & Sevierville in East Tennessee.  Circa 1927, here is a photo of him & my mother standing next to the family's 1920s car (we have always heard this was a Buick) with the taxi signs mounted on top.

Glenn & Betty 0002 copy.jpg

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14 hours ago, Walt G said:

The cycle-fendered roadster is a Daniels, made in Reading, Pa.  

 

One Daniels fact that they give at the Boyertown museum (where they have several examples) is that Daniels cars were produced only to order. I've never seen that claim elsewhere; can anyone confirm it?

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12 hours ago, Mark Gregory said:

This picture was taken in the City of Toronto in 1917 showing our Canadian Military strength.

Just in case the American's thought of coming across the Canadian  Border like they did in 1812

 

image.thumb.png.bc1025b07a538575dfc531ec7b61fe66.png

The car being crushed is a circa 1911 Stoddard Dayton limousine, 50 horsepower (can tell by the 14 spokes on rear wheel)…..

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