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Dennis Hagen

Estate wagon question.

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I may be doing the unthinkable, but here is my question: I am combining a 52 Super 4 door sedan and a 52 Super wagon, the sedan is solid and runs like a new car. The wagon was found at French Lake Auto Parts in Mn back in the woods about 15 years ago and I needed the top and there were a few other usable parts. I know the sedan is 4" longer wheelbase than the wagon but what I need is the dimension from center of rear bumper (where the license plate is) to rear of top at center of car.

Before I cut the top off the wagon I measured from pin in antenna to rear of top and got 104.5 inches so maybe just adding 4 inches to 108.5 may be correct but to me it looks like there is too much angle to the tail gate which I need to build from scratch. I have tried to scale up from photos  but want to be as close as possible. 

I already cut the top off the sedan and once I weld the wagon top on I'm committed. My son said I won't get this project done in my lifetime so I have  to prove him wrong! Thanks in advance.

Dennis Hagen 763-238-7115

 

 

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I can't help with dimensions but please update us

with photos, sounds interesting !!!

Bill

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1 hour ago, Dennis Hagen said:

what I need is the dimension from center of rear bumper (where the license plate is) to rear of top at center of car.

Your question is confusing, at least to me. Which car?

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On ‎11‎/‎29‎/‎2019 at 5:29 PM, Dennis Hagen said:

. . . but what I need is the dimension from center of rear bumper (where the license plate is) to rear of top at center of car . . . Before I cut the top off the wagon I measured from pin in antenna to rear of top and got 104.5 inches so maybe just adding 4 inches to 108.5 may be correct but to me it looks like there is too much angle to the tail gate which I need to build from scratch . . . 

 

I'm thinking that you're going about it backwards trying to determine a dimension that is not critical. 

 

If you are planning on duplicating the slope of the two rear corner posts as on an OE Model 59 or 79 wagon, the angle of slope plus the dimension of where those posts intersect at the height and horizontal distance forward from the top and back edge of the rear tail light trim would be the only two dimensions that would be critical in my estimation. The overall length from the pin in the antenna to the rear edge of the roof would be what it winds up to be. Just  going off a picture on the internet, I came up with a ± 30° angle that slopes forward from true vertical for the slope of the posts. The exact angle along with the second dimension, tailgate and  gravel pan-width dimensions would have to be verified off a 1950-1953 Buick Estate Wagon. There are a couple of Wagons in Minnesota that are listed in the current BCA Membership Roster; you might want to hook up and get to know one of the Owners.

 

IMO it's a tough conversion to complete just using two cars with the same wheelbase . . . let alone having to stretch the top and rear windows to compensate for the 4"-difference in the two wheelbases. False economics?  Good luck.

 

Al Malachowski

BCA #8965

"500 Miles West of Flint"    

Edited by 1953mack (see edit history)

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13 hours ago, Pete Phillips said:

Your question is confusing, at least to me. Which car?

The sedan is being remade into an estate wagon, the dimension or angle in question in the rear of the wagon.

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Thanks for the info, the car is in Goodyear Az in my shop. I believe the gravel pan is the same width on all models, I know this car will never be correct to the purest but will be fun to go down the road in. I have some side view pictures and by using them and trigonometry I think I can come up with a good number. I am taking pictures as I go and will post later.

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Sounds like you want to do the work yourself, but don't discount custom auto builders.  There should be some in your area that could do the initial rough-in work or the complete build.

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When we bought our house in 1981 I bought this 1950 Super to carry her garden supplies in. It ended up in a friend's woods as life went on. He died and I took a few pictures of my old cars before they cleaned up. I have about 40 pictures from its last days in the woods. Send me an email at bernie@berniedaily.com and I will send the batch, too big for here. There might be a detail that will save the day in the future.

Oct23ci.thumb.jpg.f4b163deb89385b9ff2ce94e9c504b43.jpg

Oct23br.thumb.jpg.c71573111859422192bdd163524b4255.jpg

 

And just to broaden your son's horizon, ask him what happens if you finish the wagon and figure out you are too old to start another project, just sit around and polish your Woodie all day?

Bernie

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6 hours ago, 1953mack said:

1405586118_1952BuickWoodie2.thumb.jpg.64dc054bfea10f38f423db0bdf568be3.jpg

 

Al Malachowski

BCA #8965

"500 Miles West of Flint"

Thanks Al, that is exactly what I needed.

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2 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

When we bought our house in 1981 I bought this 1950 Super to carry her garden supplies in. It ended up in a friend's woods as life went on. He died and I took a few pictures of my old cars before they cleaned up. I have about 40 pictures from its last days in the woods. Send me an email at bernie@berniedaily.com and I will send the batch, too big for here. There might be a detail that will save the day in the future.

Oct23ci.thumb.jpg.f4b163deb89385b9ff2ce94e9c504b43.jpg

Oct23br.thumb.jpg.c71573111859422192bdd163524b4255.jpg

 

And just to broaden your son's horizon, ask him what happens if you finish the wagon and figure out you are too old to start another project, just sit around and polish your Woodie all day?

Bernie

Thanks, that is almost the same shape that my 52 was in when I rescued it but it was in junk yard so a lot of parts were gone.

 I will send you my email.

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Sent the picture, a bunch.

 

If you haven't removed the roof, we have found that "capping" as much of the original roof as you can will maintain the strength of the original body and allow you to make your welds in or close to the drip rail area. It might be tempting to remove it all but I'd be squeamish. We learned this doing top chops on fabric insert roofs as well as turret top cars. A full roof, even from a different car helps hind the welds.

Since your car will have an, obviously, different look you could consider a newer ribbed wagon roof with a nice, chrome factory rack.

 

ALWAYS make some blatant change so it will be noticed quickly. That gets the conversation with the self appointed judge over quickly.

Bernie

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On ‎11‎/‎30‎/‎2019 at 8:49 AM, Dennis Hagen said:

. . . I know this car will never be correct to the purest but will be fun to go down the road in . . . 

 

Don't worry about not being correct. Wow the crowds. With today's BCA judges, they continue to hand-out gold trophies based on the most non-authentic and most overly-restored Buicks in the 400-point competition Classes.

 

Can I convince you to open up the four wheel-well openings and adding a set of wires to your Estate Wagon?  Be the first to build a 1952 SKYMASTER PROTOTYPE, retaining the longer 125.5" wheel-base, straight-eight engine and side-opening hood but deleting your front-fender portholes. If you would consider going with the 1953 solid stainless steel sweep spear trim, let me know.

 

 

 1-SKYMASTER.thumb.jpg.761c300515fe4a9181e201c5214cd46a.jpg

The above rendering was posted on this Forum in 2017. 

 

 

Al Malachowski

BCA #8965

"500 Miles West of Flint" 

 

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13 hours ago, 1953mack said:

 

Don't worry about not being correct. Wow the crowds. With today's BCA judges, they continue to hand-out gold trophies based on the most non-authentic and most overly-restored Buicks in the 400-point competition Classes.

 

Can I convince you to open up the four wheel-well openings and adding a set of wires to your Estate Wagon?  Be the first to build a 1952 SKYMASTER PROTOTYPE, retaining the longer 125.5" wheel-base, straight-eight engine and side-opening hood but deleting your front-fender portholes. If you would consider going with the 1953 solid stainless steel sweep spear trim, let me know.

 

 

 1-SKYMASTER.thumb.jpg.761c300515fe4a9181e201c5214cd46a.jpg

The above rendering was posted on this Forum in 2017. 

 

 

Al Malachowski

BCA #8965

"500 Miles West of Flint" 

 

 

That is beautiful! Something to dream about! 
My 51 convert has 53 hood hinges and is front opening, this car has linear actuators and hood goes straight up 2 feet. I’m not a fan of the side opening hoods.

 

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Thinking about this overnight finding the stainless may be impossible, I do have the capability of machining from solid stock if I would go this route. I have printed the rendering so I can “admire” it.

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Forget about my previous comment on false economics if you decide to build a SKYMASTER.

 

Something to think about: none of the OE 12-piece 1953 Buick Skylark-only sweep spear trim will work as-is on your 4" longer wheelbase Super with two additional door handles. All your trim (16 pieces?) would have to be custom made. OE 1953 Skylark trim is solid 1/8" thick and the finish is polished stainless steel . . . not chrome-plated like some Buick experts claim. In addition, the trim is not flat. All pieces are peaked down the middle anywhere from .02 to .03 inches (1/32"?) when I measured mine with digital calipers. Widths vary from 7/8"-wide on the front and rear fenders and taper-up to 1 7/8"-wide on the curved pieces just fore and aft of the rear wheels. Threaded studs on the backside are 1/4" in diameter x 3/4" in length. I can provide more dimensions and end details should you decide to custom make something similar.

 

Go for it!

 

Al Malachowski

BCA #8965

"500 Miles West of Flint"

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