Graham Man

PayPal is charging for Tariffs; 25% of the purchase

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I am personally awaiting the moment that China decides that the once $200.00 part now cost $300.00.  Noone else will be making them because they run everyone else out of business.  Then add the tarrif and the taxes.  And wait, there will be no jobs to generate money to purchase the part.   End game???

 

Matt

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2 minutes ago, jackofalltrades70 said:

I am personally awaiting the moment that China decides that the once $200.00 part now cost $300.00.  Noone else will be making them because they run everyone else out of business.  Then add the tarrif and the taxes.  And wait, there will be no jobs to generate money to purchase the part.   End game???

 

Matt

But unless it's an essential part of say regular vehicles or something not hobby related then the people just won't buy it. Many parts could be made here reasonable especially in right to work states. 

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Everyone who has Netflix should watch this documentary.  It is directly related to the auto industry and the making of an essential part that is required in the production of all automobiles. This is a story that all of us on a car forum should be interested in. I will let everyone draw their own conclusions as to what it means.  It really made me think.   It may very well be China's end game.

 

 

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Our country is proven it can adapt and adjust any and all manufacturing anytime it’s needed.  If a shortage of anything was about to create a real crisis, we would just start making it here.

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Unions pushed many manufacturers out.  The company has to remain competitive. If it can't it will close. I have always wondered when people won't give concessions. Then lose their job and the whole plant moves.  What did they accomplish?  Reasonable is one thing, a safe working environment,  within reason, Hard to make all manufacturing jobs completely safe without a little personal responsibility factored in.  Robots don't get hurt.  Now with robotics one needs to be careful how hard they push before their job is outsourced to a machine.  

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1 hour ago, auburnseeker said:

Why would they even want to buy from us?

 

The object is to make better products, so people in other countries want to buy our products since they are BETTER!  If we make the same crap level as other countries, then yes, why would other countries want to buy our products?

 

We as consumers like to buy cheap products when it suits us, and BETTER products when that suits us! Example: I own both Harbor Freight tools and Snap-On tools!

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eBay says you can get a second bill for import charges:

 

3 min article

International purchases and shipping for buyers

 

When shopping on eBay, you'll find items from all over the world. If you buy from an overseas seller, they can ship to you through regular international shipping services, or if they're in the US or UK, they may choose to use eBay's Global Shipping Program (GSP).

Are you a seller looking to sell internationally? Read our article on selling internationally

International shipping

When purchasing from an overseas seller, keep in mind that international shipping can cost more, and possibly take longer to get to you, than when you buy from a domestic seller. In some cases, you may also have to pay import charges.

If your seller is using eBay's Global Shipping Program, all the logistical challenges of international shipping, such as customs clearance, will be taken care of for you. You'll pay any import charges up front, so you won't pay anything extra when your item's delivered. You'll also benefit from international tracking.

If your seller doesn't participate in the Global Shipping Program, you can still buy from them. However, how you pay fees and import charges will differ.

Customs and import charges

When you buy from an international seller, you'll often have to pay import charges. These charges are generally based on the item's price, weight, dimensions, and country of origin, as well as any local taxes, duties, and fees.

Buying internationally with the Global Shipping Program

When you see the Global Shipping Program logo, the listing will give an estimate of both shipping and import charges. This includes everything from processing and handling fees, to international shipping. You'll see the final charges when you confirm your delivery details at checkout, before you pay.

When you use the Global Shipping Program, the seller sends the item to the global shipping center. From there, it's shipped to you.

Final Charges at Checkout

You need to use PayPal for GSP items, and your payment will be split into two transactions:

  • The first payment goes to the seller. It covers the item price and any domestic shipping costs for the seller to send the item to the global shipping provider
  • The second payment goes to the global shipping provider. It covers the international shipping cost and any import charges

After you've completed payment, you'll be able to see both the total cost and the amounts paid to the seller and the global shipping provider on the Order details page.

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If you knew a farmer that raised soybeans for export or any other crop - if you took the time to have a conversation regarding tariffs with the grower or producer - you might actually get educated.

 

Jim

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This is from a Canadian perspective. I do not shop on Ebay.  First of all Ebay tried to push me to use Paypal and at one point use Paypal to charge  my Visa. I insisted I will not use paypal . My Visa direct  only or no deal. But the question and answers on Ebay are structured in such a way that it is not possible to argue a case.  Canada Customs does not charge duties etc. for anything antique related.   Like parts. Yet ebay dealers add Import duties and international shipping. For example if Matt is selling  a used car part on Ebay , his add will mention import duties and international shipping. Did Matt import that old part that is lying in his garage and just wants to get rid of it ?  What happened to the good old Post office ? Cars over 25 years old are considered Antique but the province DOT will charge sales tax based on the value. That is if you want to register and drive it on the public road. When I go to shop I try very hard not to buy anything  hecho in China. Recently I am seeing some tools in Home depot made in US. The quality is good. Why would I want to buy an American  Channel Lock made in China ?  The quality is poor. I will go on Amazon and buy a Kneepex  made in Germany. The bitterness of buying a cheep item lingers for a long time.

I visited Toys or Us looking for any toy not made in China. Nothing doing. Today we are paying the price . PLASTIC POLUTION in part.

I read a long time ago some Political  Scientist said 'Democracy is a system where the majority naïve vote for the unscrupulous few. We the consumers are paying the tariff here in Canada. Not the Chinese ." Cut your nose to spoil your Face".  GREED GREED  GREED. Exploit cheep labour . Subject to correction.

 

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Given a choice I have always bought US products. When I buy tires they are from the US or Canada (dunno where the rubber originates). If not given a choice I look for Japan (remember the Japanese scare of the 80s) or S. Korea.

 

How does NAFTA play into all of this ?

 

The Titanic is why few passenger liners were registered in the US.

 

At least eBay tells you where the part is coming from.

 

Two of my cars were made in Germany (small, cheap,  retractible) but bought used in the USA. Plan is to replace with a Caddy.

 

ps Yamamoto's major concern was "awakening the sleeping giant". That is still true.

 

BTW my 1973 senior project at GMI was automation of big aluminum die casting machines. Computer controls, IR detection, and fiber-optic communications. Scrap rate dropped 30%. Union filed a grievance.

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I simply buy far less on ebay since the tariffs and state taxes.

 

end of story.............

 

What do I really need in life?

 

My choice.

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GregLar, that symbol of the snake swallowing itself is a more powerful statement than all the written statements on this forum. Cheers mate. I am with you. In case I am not here in Canada, Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.

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The one thing I make sure of is when buying from the US I insist on shipping USPS and nothing else.

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I think Matt Harwood's well reasoned summary covers most of what needs saying. A tariff war solves absolutely nothing, and has all kinds of unintended consequences, such as the lot the poor farmers find themselves in and the OP's gripe about "surcharges". The North American Economy should be the focus of current efforts, and the NAFTA and potentially NAFTA II were aimed at creating a stronger 3 country economy among its partners, with a combined population of about 500M. A strong Canadian economy, and a strong Mexican Economy are both good for the USA in the long run.

 

The second flank of trade positioning was the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) a trade undertaking aimed at setting up a strong trading regime between North America and it's Pacific Rim trading partners, exclusive of China. The proposed TPP pact (while not perfect) would have established a strong buttress among nations against China's perceived manipulation of trade practices (currency manipulation, theft of intellectual property,etc) let alone its huge population advantage. However, the incoming President cancelled this pending deal with no valid reason given, leaving the remaining countries with the task of forging a new agreement. While the current USA administration may believe they are a trading powerhouse who can go it alone, the reality is there is strength in numbers and Global Trade is a fact we all have to live with for the foreseeable future. With a world-wide population of 7B people, all of whom in this decade are trying to rise in the world vis-a-vis their standard of living, the USA can no longer rely on brute strength or financial leverage to have it's way.  The other countries do have a say, and at some point this reality will strike home.

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The TPP was another NAFTA masked in being better for us.  

Countries with substandard living and currency very weak against the US dollar plus a much lower pay rate often at 1/10 of ours will never be strong partners to trade with.  Their people can not afford our products.  You want free trade,  talk to the UK, Sweden ,Switzerland, Norway etc.  Places where the standard of living and pay rate are on par or even superior to ours.  Again you have to look at the overall population not the exceptions. These are the countries with high tarrifs against the US as well.  That's where I would be negotiating on trade.  

TPP was another disguised deal to drive a stake into whatever crumbs we have left. How many of those rims countries were on par with ours.  As usual it would give everything away and not offer much for us. 

They were saying how terrible it would be for us to pull out of the shipping deal as well.  Of course they are going to cry. When you are trading your Pinto even for a new Cadillac of course you don't want some one to say,  hey wait a minute I think we are getting the shaft on this deal.   About time the sales manager started checking the deals the salesmen are making. 

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Auburnseeker, I'm not sure your thought of only trading with "equally strong countries" makes sense. As a hypothetical example (with lots of peripheral issues), suppose a Cuban company exports $100 worth of sugar cane to the USA and an American company exports $100 worth of Soy beans to Cuba. In a free/fair trade arrangement, neither country would slap a duty on the other countries product. The trade agreement between the 2 countries would not be based on the wealth of either country, their governance model, their leader's current predilections, or  the weather for the day!  Companies in both countries (importers and exporters) would know the trade rules and act and make long term investments accordingly. The problem with introducing tariffs unilaterally is that they are signalling some desire by one country to (1) gain an advantage, (2) punish a past deed, (3) collect tax revenue, (4) set an example for other possible partners, (5) score political points, etc. Other countries pay close attention and are not fooled by such tactics. They know if it is a poker game (all-in bluff) or a power play. As someone above said, wise countries look at the long term, big picture, and avoid short term gain with long term pain.

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Auburnseeker, I'm not sure your thought of only trading with "equally strong countries" makes sense. As a hypothetical example (with lots of peripheral issues), suppose a Cuban company exports $100 worth of sugar cane to the USA and an American company exports $100 worth of Soy beans to Cuba. In a free/fair trade arrangement, neither country would slap a duty on the other countries product. The trade agreement between the 2 countries would not be based on the wealth of either country, their governance model, their leader's current predilections, or  the weather for the day!  Companies in both countries (importers and exporters) would know the trade rules and act and make long term investments accordingly. The problem with introducing tariffs unilaterally is that they are signalling some desire by one country to (1) gain an advantage, (2) punish a past deed, (3) collect tax revenue, (4) set an example for other possible partners, (5) score political points, etc. Other countries pay close attention and are not fooled by such tactics. They know if it is a poker game (all-in bluff) or a power play. As someone above said, wise countries look at the long term, big picture, and avoid short term gain with long term pain.

 
easy to say when you dont come from America.................
 
what has our country done since inducing NAFTA to Americas benefit??????????????????
 
WE'VE GIVEN IT ALL AWAY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! NICE JOB.
 
iF YOU DONT BELIEVE ME, LOOK AT OUR DEFICIT SINCE KENNEDY WAS IN OFFICE.
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20 hours ago, mike6024 said:

That's a weird response you wrote. Yes I expect the tariff to be incorporated into the price. And if I don't like the total price I don't buy it.

Someone may be trying to show you in your billing  the reason for the price increase. Be thankful they are showing the tariff set by your present government  and not trying to hide it in the price .

I do not know anyone that went shopping on Black Friday south of the boarder because of the higher prices from the tariffs in the US. 

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1 hour ago, Joe in Canada said:

I do not know anyone that went shopping on Black Friday south of the boarder because of the higher prices from the tariffs in the US

 

Having to pay C1.25 to buy an item marked $1.00 may have been a factor.....Eh..........Bob

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It's impossible to keep politics completely out of any serious discussion of trade and tariffs, the policies around which are set by politicians who invariably act and react from a range of motivations and priorities.

 

Having said that, I'm borderline amazed that this discussion has remained civil — and active.

 

Thank you posters and moderators.

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I would say the weak Canadian Dollar may have kept more people at bay than the Tarrifs. Also alot of people are internet shopping now so no need to travel.  Especially with Cyber Monday coming up. 

We have alot of Canadian Shoppers in our area normally.  I didn't go shopping except to get a Christmas tree,  so I steered clear of the outlets area but when I glanced over at the few parking lots i passed at major retailers they were all full to the edge and that was Saturday afternoon not Friday Morning.  Not sure how many were from Canada but I can't imagine there wasn't the usual large numbers.  Seemed to be quite a bit of traffic from the North on the Interstate which is usually Canadian traffic or people headed back to Jersey. 

 

 

So actually if the cost of cheap (price and in Quality) tools has gone up,  hasn't that done what it was meant to do, make customers search out other options and maybe spend more for better tools?  If I have the choice of buying a good or crappy tool,   I will spend more for the better tool.  I may go the used route as well to get a good tool. 

Does anyone know if American made tools have gone up with the Tarrifs?  We know raw steel went up some, but how much steel cost wise is in a wrench that they charge $20 or more for. 

If you want poor quality cheap tools,  you can buy piles of them at estate and garage sales for near nothing.  Atleast that money will stay here. 

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)

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The thread did identify a challenge for those of us in the Canadian market place trying to afford to restore an old car. Ignoring the issue of tariffs (which would add another burden), if I buy a part in Illinois for $100 and ship it for $20 to a friend's place in Maine for pick-up, my cost is US$120 or $160Can (current exchange rate about 33%)(allowing no cost for pick-up, I have a friend who passes thru there regularly). If I ship the part direct from Illinois to me, cost is $100+$40 shipping or $140. Exchange adds $47 bringing total to $187Can, and then a further 15% Fed/Prov sales tax is added at this end, ($28Can), so landed cost is close to $215Can. So when I shop eBay for example (who between them and paypal add another 10% or so ) I always double the price listed to reflect all the associated costs. Stops me from being shocked when I get my invoice from Paypal. The overall result - restoring an old car is becoming outrageously expensive, and due to artificial cost burdens. Our exchange rate with the US$ has bounced between par and -35% over the past 10+ years due to currency exchange manipulation by big investors, and has most recently dropped due to the low price of oil, one of Canada's major resource exports. But I'm still having fun, can't take it with you.

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Sometimes very high quality tools do turn up at garage and estate sales. But, there is a lot of overhead shopping that way. Oh for the good old days of the Boeing Surplus retail store here ! THAT  was real hard to beat ! I would like to take this opportunity to salute our fine Northern neighbors. Can not imagine any country in the world having such a great friend across any border. Whether you buy anything from here or not !      -    Carl 

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