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1930 Lincoln 5 Passenger Coupe


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Here's another:

https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/472198030057789/

$18,500
 
 
  • About This Vehicle
    •  
    • Driven 101,000 miles
    •  
    • Manual transmission
    •  
    • Exterior color: Green · Interior color: Grey
 

Seller's Description

1930 Lincoln "L" model 5 passenger Coupe. Will turn over and spark, have not rebuilt fuel system yet. Have all parts to finish.

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It's on ebay as well.  Probably legit.  Remember the two similar ones that sold at R&M this summer.  both at around the 10 G mark.  Being it needs quite a bit of work still,  it's a realistic selling price to actually get it sold. Big gamble with a non running engine as we all know. 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/1930-Lincoln-Model-L-Model-L/163953998668?hash=item262c6b7b4c:g:MKsAAOSwh~pd1fup 

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I agree, the more you look at description and pictures, the worse it gets.  Attractive car, it's the kind of car that, in the old days, a tourist trap in Bumstead, Anywhere, USA, Old Car Museum Extravaganza would buy, sit in the corner of the museum with a couple of mannequins and fake machine guns, and enjoy the 5 bucks apiece admission.

 

These days, not so much.  Looking at an interesting time to go through everything and get it running, which as we all know, can be anywhere from a few hundred dollars to  multiple thousands.

 
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I think the owner would be wise to discuss the wood more - I get the impression people found in past the door wood issue and then started un-upholstering the car to see what else in wood was bad.  Doors do often go first (right up there with wood around top inserts, drip moldings, around the windshields, and ...).  Using the expression "Where there is smoke there is fire" - the doors have a lot of rot and strong chance the rest of the car has wood issues too (and if not then best to have a full and detailed assessment).  Also, this car was worn out at 65K miles and now it is at over 100K. 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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John,  This is a reasonably straight of fixed up car that has potential.  It will need the touch of the masters hands on wood and other high mileage things.   Like most of the basic solid cars now coming on the market the bell curve of reality must kick in.  Condition, rarity, and price must all intersect for any of our old treasures to make viable projects.  Sadly, some cars simply need to be very reasonable (almost free) in order to justify the cost of restoration, even if you do most of the work yourself.  The bell curve ,I described, would shift again if a new market developed where there is much more demand (new people interested in old cars) to drive the market for both projects and finished projects and all the parts in between.  So far it is just not happening.  It seems sedans (and derivatives) are falling out of the sky, with the  owners all hoping for prices that we were used to seeing 10-20 years ago.  Hang on fellows, we are seeing a market shift!  I hope this Lincoln finds a good home and plenty of love.  It is, after all, a grand old car.

Al

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18 hours ago, alsfarms said:

John,  This is a reasonably straight of fixed up car that has potential.  It will need the touch of the masters hands on wood and other high mileage things.   Like most of the basic solid cars now coming on the market the bell curve of reality must kick in.  Condition, rarity, and price must all intersect for any of our old treasures to make viable projects.  Sadly, some cars simply need to be very reasonable (almost free) in order to justify the cost of restoration, even if you do most of the work yourself.  The bell curve ,I described, would shift again if a new market developed where there is much more demand (new people interested in old cars) to drive the market for both projects and finished projects and all the parts in between.  So far it is just not happening.  It seems sedans (and derivatives) are falling out of the sky, with the  owners all hoping for prices that we were used to seeing 10-20 years ago.  Hang on fellows, we are seeing a market shift!  I hope this Lincoln finds a good home and plenty of love.  It is, after all, a grand old car.

Al

If I were to wood another car (and I assume I will somewhere along the line), I would rather wood something like this than something looking like a ghost from the past.  When I say I will probably re-wood a car it has to do with my interest in certain things and selection is just not that good out there.  I saw the Lincoln on ebay and just one of those between an rock and a hard place cars as chrome plating matched to an engine rebuild would probably near surpass its fully restored value - and then you still have most of a car to restore.  That being said, perhaps just serviceable enough you could get a local car show or two in a year while working on it (aka you do not have to be embarrassed by its looks to have it in your garage).  And, good looking body style too.. 

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