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JamesR

Actual 4000 mile '77 Fury?

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Kinda looks genuine, but I'm interested to see what you guys think. I know that a 1977 anything isn't high on the list of most car collectors, but when the car is this clean  - and suggests that exceptionally low miles might be actual - it generates interest. And the Fury didn't look too bad in '77. If you were buying a '67 Fury with these kind of miles, the price wouldn't be nearly this low.

 

https://omaha.craigslist.org/cto/d/omaha-1977-plymouth-fury-coupe-only-4k/7017157529.html

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Wow..... that has to be very rare, especially a two door model. James, I have to say that it looks genuine to me.

 

Steve

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Well, you would know, Steve, given your experience. Just amazing that cars like this and yours exist.

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A buyer would want some documentation to verify

the low mileage.  The car's condition is excellent.

 

Low mileage is not especially desirable.  One writer

had an article in which he pointed out that fact.  A car

has low mileage, he said, because it likely spent much

of its life in storage--and usually it's not stored properly.

So when unearthed from its long sleep, numerous things

can go wrong:  exhaust, transmission, etc.

 

He wrote that it's better to buy a car with plenty of mileage

that has been driven and well maintained through the years.

 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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Why are the super low mileage cars always cars that nobody wants? Base models, weird colors, zero options. Should I go buy the cheapest car I can find and just store it for 25 years and unload it on some AACA member as a special "survivor?" I suppose it's kind of interesting to see well-preserved cars, but if it had 104,000 miles it would be a contender for exactly nothing, including your interest. The only thing that piqued your curiosity about that car is the low mileage. Is that really the right reason to buy a car?

 

Also bear in mind that every mile you drive it is a dollar less valuable it becomes. And if the mileage is truly that low, it's probably going to be rife with problems and not a showroom fresh specimen that needs nothing. We had a client with a dozen extremely low-mileage '70s cars (like a green 1976 Thunderbird with 2400 miles). It took thousands of dollars to get each one operational after a long period of sitting, and then we were still stuck trying to sell a 1976 Thunderbird in lame colors.

 

Just a shot of reality. If you truly like the car, go for it. If, however, you just like the mileage, you should probably think carefully before pulling out your checkbook.

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My 65 Chrysler that I had been lusting after for about 40 years came to me with just under 12,000miles.

I can attest that it was many hours of labor. Brakes, clutch, several rubber parts, difficult carburetor, even had to reseal the steering gear, and worst of all, heater core on an AC car.

But she's a beauty and original buy in was somewhat less than this Fury.

 

However I do like this Fury, These cars drive comfortably. I had a 79 300 once that was the same body and if it weren't for the rust starting to be an issue I would still have it.

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Edited by JACK M (see edit history)
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Quote "Brakes, clutch, several rubber parts, difficult carburetor, even had to reseal the steering gear, and worst of all, heater core on an AC car." End quote.

 

Most 1965 Chryslers came with either a Stromberg type WWC or Carter AFB, both of which are excellent carburetors. A few of the base 1965 Chryslers came with Carter type BBD two-barrels, which definitely could be difficult.

 

Jon.

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12 hours ago, plymouthcranbrook said:

In 2007 I purchased my 80 Volare with 8400 actual miles on it.  They are out there.

 

 

Do you still have it? Love to see a picture of it.

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5 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

A buyer would want some documentation to verify

the low mileage.  The car's condition is excellent.

 

Low mileage is not especially desirable.  One writer

had an article in which he pointed out that fact.  A car

has low mileage, he said, because it likely spent much

of its life in storage--and usually it's not stored properly.

So when unearthed from its long sleep, numerous things

can go wrong:  exhaust, transmission, etc.

 

He wrote that it's better to buy a car with plenty of mileage

that has been driven and well maintained through the years.

 

 

This is very true. There was the old farmer in the Midwest whose collection went up for sale, and most of the extremely low mileage cars were non-functioning because of internal engine corrosion and poor gasket seal - a result of non-use and improper storage. I think I remember a late 50's Chevy truck from his collection (with only a few hundred actual miles on it) even having surface rust on the body. 

 

It would be interesting to know if the engine in that Fury smokes or knocks.

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1 hour ago, carbking said:

Quote "Brakes, clutch, several rubber parts, difficult carburetor, even had to reseal the steering gear, and worst of all, heater core on an AC car." End quote.

 

Most 1965 Chryslers came with either a Stromberg type WWC or Carter AFB, both of which are excellent carburetors. A few of the base 1965 Chryslers came with Carter type BBD two-barrels, which definitely could be difficult.

 

Jon.

 

I am not much of a carburetor guy but pretty sure its an AFB. (its been awhile now)

It was gummed up and corroded so bad that the secondary's would not open, nor would the choke close.

I had to replace the floats. I guess they don't make those any more and it was suggested that with some tweaking the floats from an Edlebrock could be made to work.

But being as stubborn as I am I wanted original floats. I found a pair and over paid. Maybe a mistake but it at long last in fact "floated" I must have had that carb off and on the car a hundred times. (exaggerating). I would get the thing running perfect only to find a couple of days later the offending float was full of gas again.

At least I was able to prove to myself that I cannot (shouldn't) solder.

 

And yes, The two barrels of similar vintage have given me problems as well.

 

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7 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

Why are the super low mileage cars always cars that nobody wants? Base models, weird colors, zero options. Should I go buy the cheapest car I can find and just store it for 25 years and unload it on some AACA member as a special "survivor?" I suppose it's kind of interesting to see well-preserved cars, but if it had 104,000 miles it would be a contender for exactly nothing, including your interest. The only thing that piqued your curiosity about that car is the low mileage. Is that really the right reason to buy a car?

 

Also bear in mind that every mile you drive it is a dollar less valuable it becomes. And if the mileage is truly that low, it's probably going to be rife with problems and not a showroom fresh specimen that needs nothing. We had a client with a dozen extremely low-mileage '70s cars (like a green 1976 Thunderbird with 2400 miles). It took thousands of dollars to get each one operational after a long period of sitting, and then we were still stuck trying to sell a 1976 Thunderbird in lame colors.

 

Just a shot of reality. If you truly like the car, go for it. If, however, you just like the mileage, you should probably think carefully before pulling out your checkbook.

 

 

Good points. I'm personally not interested in the Fury, or most of the cars I post in the Cars for Sale section, but figure there might be people in the old car community who might be interested in unusual specimens (in terms of mileage) like this. The late 70's are generally unappealing to me as an era. The 1940's, 50's and 60's conjure up a greater sense of history and popular culture for me. Nevertheless, the late 1970's were a long time ago, and - in retrospect - very different from today, so the cars of that era can bring great memories to some people.

 

I would say that there are a lot of reasons to collect cars, and having an old car that at least visually approximates the condition of a brand new car could be one of those reasons. Why do cars like this exist? I've wondered about that, too. I'm guessing cars like this show up sometimes as a result of an elderly first owner who didn't drive much; someone who bought the car new when they were 75, but they lived to be 102. (Another real good reasons to be suspicious about the maintenance on cars like this.) By the time the estate gets settled, the car is a low mileage "antique" of sorts, so it's kept as such by the subsequent owners over the next couple of decades.

 

Ultimately I agree with Matt: I'm not a person of means, and there are so many cars I dreamed of owning as a kid - '63 to '65 Riviera, Mustang, MGB, '53 Studebaker 2 door hardtop, etc. - that I would rather have a presentable example of (by my low standards) for not much more than the asking price of this pristine Fury. Still, I'm really hoping someone falls in love with this Plymouth for what it is, checks out the mechanicals real good, and buys it.

Edited by JamesR (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, JamesR said:

 

 

Do you still have it? Love to see a picture of it.

Yes, about 30,000 on it now. I must have been a lucky guy with it as I only had to replace rubber parts, thermostat housing, and tires.  Drove it 400 miles home with no trouble.  Replaced rear brakes a couple of years ago(fronts still original) and I noticed this year it needs a radiator. 

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