Peter Gariepy

Any Brewster experts out there?

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Can you identify this Brewster automobile?  Year, model, etc?

I wish i had more/better photos, but thats all the owner would let me take. 

Are there any historical archives to research on Brewsters?

Any recent sales of Brewsters of note I can see that will help me value this car?

Thanks in advance for any help!

 

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Yes, there are some really rare cars hiding in this collection. Pierce-Arrows, V16 Cadillacs, Packards, etc.  Doing my best to see how i might arrange the sale.

 

 

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Cool car - it is like a 34 or 35 Ford.  There are several surviving 4 door convertibles, though I have not seen a 4 door convertible modified to a sedan (very RR PII style)

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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John is correct, a 1934 or 35 Ford V8 chassis. I have a period photograph of a car taken by Brewster of the exact same body style. Hope to find time to post here . I believe that a story about Brewster will be appearing in the CCCA magazine sometime soon., not sure when or what issue as I no longer belong to that club.

That is a pretty cool 1940 Buick conv sedan next to the Brewster as well. I like the 1940 Buicks and have a Roadmaster series 71C conv sedan sitting about 25 feet away from where I am typing this right now.

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By the way Peter, while Mrs Roosevelt has been quoted often as first using the phrase attached to your  profile, it appears Henry Thomas Buckle said it first in a published work in 1901. Mrs Roosevelt was likely book smart, and paraphrased his thoughts. The origins of this tripartite division of conversations is apparently in early theology. Buckle wrote dogmatically in 1901: “Men and women range themselves into three classes or orders of intelligence; you can tell the lowest class by their habit of always talking about persons; the next by the fact that their habit is always to converse about things; the highest by their preference for the discussion of ideas.”

 

 

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Neat car. In that condition, value is not high. It’s a Ford with a Brewster convertible sedan body from what I can tell. They are good drivers, but expensive to restore and service the body,  the chassis is easy.

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I agree with Ed,  although the convertible sedan should be a premium over the towncar which seems more plentiful and is less attractive.

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There is a Brewster at the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome. The body on that one is mounted on around an early 1930's Packard Chassis and the body has Patent Leather Fenders. Wondering, Is that a Mid twenties Oldsmobile Roadster against the wall to the left? 

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)

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Peter, get in touch with Don Weir, from York, Pa. He has a nice collection of Brewsters. He is very knowledgeable on the cars, and a great fellow to talk to. Thanks, John

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Ted Holden of Great American Race fame said he was at one time the Editor of the Brewster Club of America's Newsletter because he had a typewriter and a copy machine.  We often met Brewseter owners all across the country, apparently still an active group.  Ted's Brewster was one of few that wer re-Chassied after WWII.   

(Which was the intention of Brewster during the  Great Depression)  Ted's was on a 47 Buick Chassis.   A fun car for us to go out to eat in after training for the Great Races in the 1935 Chrysler Airflow.  Like his El Camino Tank, Amphicars,  Isetta, 15 Packard and others, they were all always ready for use and fun adventures.

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On 12/9/2019 at 12:53 PM, edinmass said:

Neat car. In that condition, value is not high. It’s a Ford with a Brewster convertible sedan body from what I can tell. They are good drivers, but expensive to restore and service the body,  the chassis is easy.

It initially looked like a Convertible sedan that had a hard roof on it like a RR PII styled car, wondering if someone has Convertible Sedan on the brain (which is a bad idea as whatever it was from new is what it should be today).

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Heavens!  The absolute most inspired, wonderfully proportioned and detailed Rolls-Royce Phantom II sport sedan by Brewster, AJS289.  It has verve in spades!  Its essentially the Henley roadster integrated with the top and rear tonneau configuration of the Derby Speedster. If that design doesn't set your heart racing, check to see if you cast a shadow!

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44 minutes ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Heavens!  The absolute most inspired, wonderfully proportioned and detailed Rolls-Royce Phantom II sport sedan by Brewster, AJS289.  It has verve in spades!  Its essentially the Henley roadster integrated with the top and rear tonneau configuration of the Derby Speedster. If that design doesn't set your heart racing, check to see if you cast a shadow!


That’s not AJS289. There were three of these Special Newmarket’s built, two had a standard front seat with divider, 289 had no divider and bucket seats in front. At over 28,000 dollars delivered in 1933 289 was 8300 dollars more than the famous Duesenberg “20 Grand”.....nothing like a bargain basement supercharged Model J!

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2 hours ago, edinmass said:


That’s not AJS289. There were three of these Special Newmarket’s built, two had a standard front seat with divider, 289 had no divider and bucket seats in front. At over 28,000 dollars delivered in 1933 289 was 8300 dollars more than the famous Duesenberg “20 Grand”.....nothing like a bargain basement supercharged Model J!

I knew if I threw that AJS289 number out there, you'd correct me!    Taking Rolls-Royce in America by John Webb de Campi off the shelf, he identifies the image of one as either 259 AJS or 289 AJS.  Do we know who designed of these sport sedan?  Inskip?  I didn't know that three were built, that's great.  Are all three still extant?  Thanks Ed for enlightening on these magnificent motorcars.  

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1 hour ago, 58L-Y8 said:

I knew if I threw that AJS289 number out there, you'd correct me!    Taking Rolls-Royce in America by John Webb de Campi off the shelf, he identifies the image of one as either 259 AJS or 289 AJS.  Do we know who designed of these sport sedan?  Inskip?  I didn't know that three were built, that's great.  Are all three still extant?  Thanks Ed for enlightening on these magnificent motorcars.  


I have an unfair advantage.........289AJS is parked about 100 feet from my computer as I write this. Drove it last week about 80 miles.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)

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Ed

Unfair advantage forgiven.  Is 289AJS one of the three of this sterling design?   With the front bucket seats and no divider?  How is the top constructed?  Wood frame covered with landau leather or aluminum?   Does the rear door window full retract below the belt-line?  

 

Suppose you can tell I'm rather smitten with these Brewster sport sedans...

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