Crazyfamily

1929 Chevrolet Help Please!!

Recommended Posts

While I’ve been a part of the Buick groups for a year and half I really haven’t frequented the Chevrolet groups!

 

I am trying to help a friend out who recently got his hands on a 1929 Chevrolet .  He doesn’t really mess with computer so I am trying to determine what model this is, when we google 1929 Chevrolet Coupe the pictures that come up seem to have a shorter body panel between the back of the doors and the back of the roof!

 

Also, any help identifying this Carter Carb and where I can find a rebuild kit for it?  Is there another carb that you fine folks have used to flip the intake and put on a more modern 40’s-50’s down draft carb?  

 

Someone gutted the vacuum pump and installed a electric fuel pump (it’s 12v) and a regulator.  I personally have a 1927 Buick that uses the original SW Vacuum Pump and carb that I am pleased with!  My buddy however just wants to drive this 1929 and doesn’t really care to get back to an original state at this time...... I know it’s a shame and maybe I’ll pry it from his hands soon for myself!

 

In the meantime I am here to try to tap into your knowledge and help a friend!

 

Any Info sure would be appreciated!

 

Regards,

Crazy-

61A48EF4-6F4E-4478-BCC4-054BF833917E.jpeg

7420C1F8-EEF1-4551-92D8-B3FB99335366.jpeg

48F1B505-B0A6-4B84-95C1-1B881EE786E5.jpeg

E90DE169-9650-493B-9E2F-8B03EC00D70E.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your friend has a 1928 Chevrolet , not a 1929. The 1928 was the last of the 4-cylinder Chevies. The new 6-cylinder engine was introduced in 1929 along with completely restyled bodies. The 1929 was an entirely different car from the earlier models.

 

Don

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, DLynskey said:

Your friend has a 1928 Chevrolet , not a 1929. The 1928 was the last of the 4-cylinder Chevies. The new 6-cylinder engine was introduced in 1929 along with completely restyled bodies. The 1929 was an entirely different car from the earlier models.

 

Don

 

Thanks for info Don, I asked him if he was sure it was a 1929 and he said he checked the title and it’s titled as a 1929?

 

it def is a 4 cyl no doubt about that!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It might have been sold in 1929 and titled as a 1929 or I suspect many states didn't have titles at that time and it was dated based on what the owner thought it was. Either way it's definitely a 1928. Below is a photo I took years ago of a 1928 coupe.

 

 

731351032_Chevrolet1928Coupe.thumb.jpg.992c5708f152e5526632864f42750744.jpg

 

Someone has taken a lot of liberties on the one your friend has -- unauthentic bright red paint, painted radiator shell and bumpers, spare tire carrier removed, top material not installed correctly, missing the landau irons and trunk handle, modern seats and likely other items not as apparent. It might make a good driver and will be an interesting ride at the local cruise-in but will take a lot to restore it to original.

 

Don

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That’s what I was thinking too regarding year Don.  Knowing standardized state to state probably didn’t exist back then!

 

yeah he paid $3500 for it and really doesn’t care about what’s authentic, he just wants to drive it and have a little fun.

 

Even in its current state I’d prob pay $3500 for it just to give it to my youngest Son to teach him about mechanics!  

 

Any idea what “more modern” down draft carb will fit that Intake if we flip it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It should be good for that. The mechanics are simple to work with and parts are readily available. As you know from your Buicks , if you learn to drive a car with mechanical brakes and non-synchronized gears you can drive just about anything (well, except maybe a Model T Ford). I don't  know about the carburetor, but the guys on the VCCA forum will. Like this forum it's free and the members are very knowledgeable and eager to help.

 

https://vccachat.org/ubbthreads.php/forums/20/1/1912-1928.html

 

Don

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It APPEARS to be a 1928 carburetor. There are identifying letters that will prove/disprove this. The 1928 Chevrolet carburetor would have either a "RAKXO" or a "C RAKXO".

 

If either, then we can furnish a rebuilding kit.

 

Jon.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, carbking said:

It APPEARS to be a 1928 carburetor. There are identifying letters that will prove/disprove this. The 1928 Chevrolet carburetor would have either a "RAKXO" or a "C RAKXO".

 

If either, then we can furnish a rebuilding kit.

 

Jon.

 

I’ll get the info off the side after it comes out of the carb dip/soak!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, carbking said:

It APPEARS to be a 1928 carburetor. There are identifying letters that will prove/disprove this. The 1928 Chevrolet carburetor would have either a "RAKXO" or a "C RAKXO".

 

If either, then we can furnish a rebuilding kit.

 

Jon.

 

Hello Jon,

 

yes Sir how do we go about ordering the rebuild kit from you?  Do you also have replacement bowls?  I found them online but if I can place one order that would be easier!

 

i look forward to hearing from you!

 

**someone has tried to “fix” the cracked bowl by using JB weld all over the inside bottom of the bowl!  Chucks were everywhere and lots of corrosion inside carb as well.  No doubt it won’t run well or allow anything more than a slow slight throttle due to jets being clogged plus it needs a new low pressure fuel regulator as well.

 

im going to do the carb clean and rebuild for him however he is going to get the fuel regulator himself..... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What helps seal this connection up?  I know it isn’t supposed to be the gooped on silicone that’s on it now!

FBE7134D-FE89-4B8E-8C40-4C7BF168C62A.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, DLynskey said:

It should be good for that. The mechanics are simple to work with and parts are readily available. As you know from your Buicks , if you learn to drive a car with mechanical brakes and non-synchronized gears you can drive just about anything (well, except maybe a Model T Ford). I don't  know about the carburetor, but the guys on the VCCA forum will. Like this forum it's free and the members are very knowledgeable and eager to help.

 

https://vccachat.org/ubbthreads.php/forums/20/1/1912-1928.html

 

Don

 

Thanks Don, I just joined the site.  Figured I might as well let your suggestion since who knows maybe my buddy will get tired of his new toy and want to give it away...... to me!

 

😂😂😂😂😉

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, carbking said:

It APPEARS to be a 1928 carburetor. There are identifying letters that will prove/disprove this. The 1928 Chevrolet carburetor would have either a "RAKXO" or a "C RAKXO".

 

If either, then we can furnish a rebuilding kit.

 

Jon.

Hello again Jon,

 

it appears its a RAKX-O, if you can get me set up for a rebuild kit that would be great!  Message me or post here?

 

 

758E5516-2328-4F51-A41A-3EBF2826A9E6.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Couple things on a 28’. First, the flex pipe on the carb inlet needs to be connected to the air filter intake can which is actually the down pipe at the rear of the exhaust. I can see the flex pipe but not if it’s connected to the exhaust. The 28’ is very prone to icing up the intake and the intake air needs to be warm to prevent the icing as the carb will not atomize the fuel well. The other thing is the 28’ has no provision for the overhead valve train to be oiled by the engine oil pump. Instead, there is normally a canvas covered felt pad that sits on top of the rocker arms and is oiled every time the car is run by putting some oil in the holes on the valve cover with a pump oil can. These engines normally have oil running down the sides of the engine. The engine in the pictures appears awfully clean which hints that possibly the top end is not getting oiled. I know of a instance where the owner of a 28’ complained his motor was always oily and he kept cleaning it. Then finally it stopped getting dirty. It wasn’t too much longer on one of his regular jaunts out to his vacation cabinthat the valve train seized up and ruined a perfectly running motor!  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, chistech said:

Couple things on a 28’. First, the flex pipe on the carb inlet needs to be connected to the air filter intake can which is actually the down pipe at the rear of the exhaust. I can see the flex pipe but not if it’s connected to the exhaust. The 28’ is very prone to icing up the intake and the intake air needs to be warm to prevent the icing as the carb will not atomize the fuel well. The other thing is the 28’ has no provision for the overhead valve train to be oiled by the engine oil pump. Instead, there is normally a canvas covered felt pad that sits on top of the rocker arms and is oiled every time the car is run by putting some oil in the holes on the valve cover with a pump oil can. These engines normally have oil running down the sides of the engine. The engine in the pictures appears awfully clean which hints that possibly the top end is not getting oiled. I know of a instance where the owner of a 28’ complained his motor was always oily and he kept cleaning it. Then finally it stopped getting dirty. It wasn’t too much longer on one of his regular jaunts out to his vacation cabinthat the valve train seized up and ruined a perfectly running motor!  

 

Yeah I am familiar with the piling required but don’t think my friend is!  I will make sure he knows when I return his carb back to him after I rebuild it! 

 

He ordered all the parts yesterday for the rebuild so hopefully by next weekend we can get him driving at least!  Explained to him the list of suggested items to check off the “to do list” BEFORE he attempts to drive this car any further that was sent to me by Hugh back when we got our car a year and half ago!

 

Thanks for heads up on oiling the valve train!!  

Edited by Crazyfamily (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok I need the help of God and YOU fine folks with this carb!!!

 

so I rebuilt the carb, and it is clean and I mean clean!  So put the carb on the car and car started right up.  Car will sit and idle and then like clock work it will start to stumble and then smooth out, almost like clockwork around every 20 seconds this happens.  
 

We readjusted they float per spec of 3/4 of an inch from the lip the bowl sits on, without the gasket per spec, and seems to smooth out a little.  I was thinking that the float adjustment was the issue originally!

 

Now that’s “a little” better however what should be the base initial adjustment to the air screw (when he got the car it was screwed all the way in) and the idle speed screw?

 

Seems that no matter where I adjust these it makes very little difference and when you rev the car up a little there is no consistency on the idle the car returns to.  One time you blip the throttle and it returns to a low smooth idle, next time you try it it lowers the idle speed slightly but is much higher than it was before we blip the throttle (sorry I am a bike guy and blip the throttle is a common term!😂)!

 

So what should the initial adjustment be and where am I going wrong?

C5086A4F-FAA0-418C-B997-A7F24C405BC7.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back out the air screw. Try 1/2 turn, maybe as much as 1 full turn.

 

It is an inverse idle circuit. Lightly seated is maximum RICH. Your description sounds like an overrich idle.

 

Jon.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Part of what you are probably experiencing is the vacuum tank cycling. When the vacuum tank is drawing gas out of the gas tank it will run smooth. When the float in the vacuum cycles to release gas down to the carb it vents to atmosphere - and creates a small vacuum leak. Most applications it is a longer cycle than 20 seconds. On a 4 cylinder car it will be more noticable than a larger car because 6 and 8 cylinder engines are inherently smoother running. Also probably more noticable if the vacuum is low due to poor compression or other small leaks. To confirm this you can install a small piece of 3/8" clear refridgerator drain line in the vacuum tank inlet.  Doesn't have to be pretty it just needs to seal. You are not going to leave it there permanently.  Let us know what you find. Art

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the info, this car was switched to an electric fuel pump, we have dialed down to 1 psi, which it can go lower but it seems it likes 1psi.

 

and it is on 12v as welll.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ok adjusting air screw per carb king as mentioned above doesn’t seem to help.  was wondering if anyone has a specific later model DOWN DRAFT carb that we could switch to and flip the intake over to use it?

 

ive heard of guys on the Buick Pre War Forum doing this with good luck but curious if anyone on the Chevy side has done so?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now