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Musk's Cyber Truck speed bump


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In 1981 he was right. Few remember that Apple had disasters (Apple III, Lisa).

 

ps both Apple and Microsoft computers are Intel based. Think the Mac was the last Motorola 68000 based.

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23 minutes ago, padgett said:

In 1981 he was right. Few remember that Apple had disasters (Apple III, Lisa).

 

ps both Apple and Microsoft computers are Intel based. Think the Mac was the last Motorola 68000 based.

We were building our own in house test equipment using intel 8080, 8086 and discreet intel I/O chips and hovering over the finished product with those machine code cards, “C3, D2” ect.  The big breakthrough was the intel single board computer that greatly simplified our work.  Remember the intel development system you had to boot with switches on the front panel?  

 

Now we are wayyyy off topic!

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3 hours ago, TerryB said:

My boss, years ago, said intel and Microsoft were good investments, Apple not so much...

 

As a kid in the mid seventies I was told to get into computers because it would "soon be the fastest growing industry" according to my counselor. I thought he was crazy and I hated the thought of working with a computer because they made me feel that I was working in an insane asylum (they were as big as cars and filled a floor at the time) so needless to say I  went a different path and have regretted it since 🙄

 

I will concede the fact that EV's are the future whether we like it or not, but until they correct design and efficiency issues, they will have a weak argument as they attempt to win us diesel or gas owners over. Whether that is 2-10 years off is hard to say, but I have a sense they are close to a breakthrough. Why the heads of Chrysler/Fiat have their heads in the sand on this topic is beyond me. I often wonder if they intentionally want to be rid of the Dodge Brothers and Chrysler name all together. My how John, Horace and Walter must be turning in their graves...

 

 

EV trucks are coming, there's no denying it. I only hope that it's in a free market with an equal playing field for all in both the short and long term.

When they do get the lions share of the market will the early founders be forgotten and stomped on or will the new comers pay respect to those that paved the way for them in this new automobile era? 

Edited by 30DodgePanel (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

Let's just say I would have been a nerd if the term existed. In 1979 I was designing flight controls for afterburning aircraft using cascaded bit slice processors (AMD 2901) when I got this data book (is in the den somewhere) from Intel on their new 8086 16 bit processor (8088 came later). Was kinda fascinating since it could address a whole meg. Wow. (by 1981 the price of a meg of ram was down to $3k)

 

BTW to boot a PDP-8 involved flipping a lot of toggle switches to load the bootstrap into memory. Ah the days of microcode.

 

Still wonder if the grid can handle a lot of electric thingies.

 

ps last three spoke wheel I recall involved TRX tires, are they available anywhere. Prolly doesn't matter since those Mustangs all have tube chassis and Cayote motors now...

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1 hour ago, padgett said:

Let's just say I would have been a nerd if the term existed. In 1979 I was designing flight controls for afterburning aircraft using cascaded bit slice processors (AMD 2901) when I got this data book (is in the den somewhere) from Intel on their new 8086 16 bit processor (8088 came later). Was kinda fascinating since it could address a whole meg. Wow. (by 1981 the price of a meg of ram was down to $3k)

 

BTW to boot a PDP-8 involved flipping a lot of toggle switches to load the bootstrap into memory. Ah the days of microcode.

 

Still wonder if the grid can handle a lot of electric thingies.

 

ps last three spoke wheel I recall involved TRX tires, are they available anywhere. Prolly doesn't matter since those Mustangs all have tube chassis and Cayote motors now...

 

Back in the day I was one of those "Computer Guys" that worked in the college computer lab. I worked for the Math Professor in charge of the lab.

I was one of a couple of Lab assistants that was charged with loading the boot strap into the computer (using the toggle switches) then feeding the punch paper tape (PPT) in to complete the Operating System Loading procedure. Later the PPT was replaced by an 8" Floppy Drive with it's "massive" storage capacity of 80KB but we still had to use the toggle switches to load the boot strap. BTW, this professor wrote his own operating system for that computer. Ahh the days of the old teletype terminals before the age of video terminal.

 

That professor got me an internship at the National Bureau of Standards (now called NIST). That was where I got to see the IBM 360 computer for the first time which took up a big part of a very large computer room. Funny how the smartphone I have now has roughly 1,500 times the amount of memory that the IBM 360 had and at under $1000 is a bargain compared to the $3.5+ million that the IBM 360 originally cost. Talk about advancing technology.

 

 

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And if cars had followed the same path you would have a 1,000 hp one for each foot.

 

I remember the mod for a TTY to go from 66wpm to 100. And the joy when Mylar replaced paper tape. Was in the last class the AF taught vacuum tubes...

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On 11/22/2019 at 11:15 AM, auburnseeker said:

Why do you need armored glass?  Is he expecting to sell a bunch of them to the Taliban?  I could see a chip/ crack proof Windshield,  that would be nice,  but beyond that not sure the reasoning unless they are afraid all us oil burners will go Mad Max on them? 

There a lot of businessmen and businesswomen around the world that buy armor plated and/or bullet proof glass vehicles.  Also a common upgrade for the well heeled as well.

 

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5 hours ago, charlier said:
7 hours ago, padgett said:

Let's just say I would have been a nerd if the term existed. In 1979 I was designing flight controls for afterburning aircraft using cascaded bit slice processors (AMD 2901) when I got this data book (is in the den somewhere) from Intel on their new 8086 16 bit processor (8088 came later). Was kinda fascinating since it could address a whole meg. Wow. (by 1981 the price of a meg of ram was down to $3k)

 

BTW to boot a PDP-8 involved flipping a lot of toggle switches to load the bootstrap into memory. Ah the days of microcode.

 

Still wonder if the grid can handle a lot of electric thingies.

 

ps last three spoke wheel I recall involved TRX tires, are they available anywhere. Prolly doesn't matter since those Mustangs all have tube chassis and Cayote motors now...

Back in the day I was one of those "Computer Guys" that worked in the college computer lab. I worked for the Math Professor in charge of the lab.

I was one of a couple of Lab assistants that was charged with loading the boot strap into the computer (using the toggle switches) then feeding the punch paper tape (PPT) in to complete the Operating System Loading procedure. Later the PPT was replaced by an 8" Floppy Drive with it's "massive" storage capacity of 80KB but we still had to use the toggle switches to load the boot strap. BTW, this professor wrote his own operating system for that computer. Ahh the days of the old teletype terminals before the age of video terminal.

 

That professor got me an internship at the National Bureau of Standards (now called NIST). That was where I got to see the IBM 360 computer for the first time which took up a big part of a very large computer room. Funny how the smartphone I have now has roughly 1,500 times the amount of memory that the IBM 360 had and at under $1000 is a bargain compared to the $3.5+ million that the IBM 360 originally cost. Talk about advancing technology.

 

 

 

Yikes! Not only one, nor two but at least three of us on this forum!

 

First paid programming job in 1973 was in college working for a professor on a Data General Nova 800 with a massive 8K words (16K bytes) of memory. I found getting paid to play on computers beat having to work for a living so I kept it up for more than four decades, generally moving on from a company when I was promoted to management. Toward the end I was usually the only native born software engineer in the group. Still trying to keep my hand in a little doing some open source stuff (got a little Linux box in the corner taking its sweet time on a project as I view this forum to pass the time waiting for it).

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Similar. my first 10MB hard disk was an 18" removable and had no idea how I would ever fill for a DG Eclipse used to "fly" F-16 flight controls. H.ad to use half of the memory for the base program and the other half to swap in subroutines as needed. Have always felt more comfortable down in the machine code though could think in Fortran V (added if-then-else and case statements.). Helps with reprogramming my cars. Today even my TV is BusyBox and am playing with a Raspberry Pi and Arduino.

 

 

gtpdash24may.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

Given the continuing interests in Teslas on the forum, both on the board generally and in this thread specifically, this story seemed of possible interest: 

 

Tesla Is the Most Valuable Car Company In America Ever

https://www.marketwatch.com/articles/tesla-stock-most-valuable-car-company-51578415861

 

Tesla stock is up again in midday trading Tuesday, by almost $7, or 1.5%. The S&P 500, by contrast, is down about 0.3%. It marks another all-time high for the electric vehicle pioneer. Tesla shares are up a whopping 93% over the past three months and have soared almost 10% year to date, far better than the 0.4% gain of the Dow Jones Industrial Average.

 

The recent run, however, is only part of the story. The gains have made Tesla the most valuable car company in America ever. There was Henry Ford, then Alfred Sloan, and Lee Iacocca. Now Elon Musk gets his place on the American automotive Mount Rushmore.

. . . . 

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It's funny because Musk got in serious trouble.

 

Stock is now 469.06 USD +17.52 (3.88%)   and    Mkt cap    $84.55B


Back in 2018 Musk was mad, the stock was down, he was blaming Wall Street, short sellers, or stock manipulators. And he threatened to "take it private" at $420. He had no funding or partners in place to take it private at such an inflated price as $420. SEC fined him, etc.

 

Aug 19, 2018 - Here's what's happened: On Tuesday, August 7, Musk tweeted that he was considering taking Tesla private at $420 and already had funding secured. Current shareholders, he said, would either be able to sell at $420 or hold on to their shares and go private.

 

Aug 8, 2018 - Elon Musk says he wants to take Tesla private at over $70 billion — here's what that means. Billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk shocked Wall Street on Tuesday with a tweet in which he said he wants to take Tesla private at a price of $420 per share. Such a deal would value the electric car company at roughly $70 billion ...

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