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1 hour ago, Roadhog1951 said:

Hello, has anyone here upgraded the front suspension/steering on a mid 56 model 48 (special) Buick I am thinking of the Mustang 2 rack and pinion set ups,  any suggestions (except DON"T!)  Any other options? Show me yours!!!  THANKS< ED

 

I'm skeptical of MII suspensions. Scratch out "Mustang II" and write in "Pinto", which is where that design came from. Yeah, I know the aftermarket kits don't actually use any Ford parts. Still, the geometry started under a 1971 Pinto.

 

You might find this article useful.

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3 hours ago, joe_padavano said:

I'm skeptical of MII suspensions. Scratch out "Mustang II" and write in "Pinto", which is where that design came from. Yeah, I know the aftermarket kits don't actually use any Ford parts. Still, the geometry started under a 1971 Pinto.

 

Actually that was the 74 Pinto, the earlier Pintos being a completely different car. The 74-up Pinto and Mustang II are indeed the same car underneath. This is the version that donated it's suspension to so many hot rods a few decades ago. The geometry is actually REALLY GOOD. The 74 Pinto (or Mustang II if you prefer) was let down by a lack of body rigidity, not the front suspension geometry. It was probably a lot better choice than some of the other things used in hot rods back then.

 

The thing is, now that there are a million aftermarket kits with tubular control arms, etc, somehow the strut rod has disappeared, and the lower control arm replaced by a wishbone. This probably makes it way easier to adapt to other cars, but I do not see how it could be the same geometry. Even if they did get the rotational axis of the lower control arm about the same (it doesn't look like they did), where would the rigidity come from under braking load? The wishbone isn't very wide.

 

I too am extremely skeptical of these suspension kits. A real 74-up Pinto suspension would probably be better, but it sure ain't much to look at, and you need a rigid place to land the strut rod that might or might not exist depending on the frame width. Then there is track width. You can't just change it without a custom rack and pinion.

 

I find it pretty amusing that they insist on calling it "Mustang II" instead of "Pinto". :lol:

 

 

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
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Do a search in the Post War forums for steering box conversions. Some have used a 2004 Jeep Cherokee box with success and others have used the Tri-5 Chevy box from CPP with success using a 55 pitman arm.

 

I heard the rack kits for Tri-5 Chevies are pretty close, almost that the frame width is very similar and its a matter of re-drilling holes. The issue with rack kits is that the rack tie rod end needs to go through the arc travel that matches the steering knuckle on the upright. The issue is that Buicks have very long bottom trailing arms, which makes it difficult to match the arc. 

 

Any route you go that modifies or removes the drag link should consider changing the steering knuckle geometry. This is a pretty good, surface level read.

 

DO NOT buy the steering kit from eBay. If you need evidence as to why, I will supply images but just take my word on it that you will have wasted your money on sub-par manufacturing that isn't even with correct dimensions.

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  • 6 months later...

Go check out the Fatman Fabrications website. They have some Buick stuff. The catalog is online but I would just call them. IFS with disc brakes and rack/pinion would be a nice set up. 

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In ANY steering system change to any later-model set-up, you HAVE to consider the weight of the car AND the weight of the front end of the car.  The Mustang II set-up has been popular for decades on street rods, but that only means it CAN fit, not how well it will work or hold up over time and use.  Might also need to consider how it will connect to the existing steering column!!!  Not going to say "Don't do it", but "Do it with different components" instead.  If all you're after is power steering.  BUT I also suspect that Mustang II set-up is too light of a system for your car.

 

I believe that the later Jeep power gearbox is what Borgeson sells?  What about swapping in an electric power steering column and using a GM fast-ratio manual gearbox instead?

 

NTX5467

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