Wowabunga

The 7 Most Dangerous & Unlucky OEM Jacks

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11 hours ago, kgreen said:

 

 

Notice the tool kit is correct... using period correct tools for the win.  LOVE this photo thank you...!!!!!!

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I recall in the mid-late 1950s, a neighbor using two (2) bumper jacks,, on the front bumper of his 1952 Nash Ambassador,  and nothing else but the hand brake operating on the rear wheels.

He had a scissor jack to support the inline 6-cylinder engine while he removed the Hydra-Matic transmission.

 

First the transmission fell on his chest, and then the Nash fell off of the jacks as they both went sideways, regrettably crushing him in the process. 

His widow had the Nash towed to a junk yard in Avanel, NJ.

 

For many years thereafter, I only used my dad's tripod screw-type bumper jack with three legs angled to the surface, (and wooden boards under the legs if not on concrete), which actually pulled the car slightly toward the jack. I also bought him a new one for his car.

 

It was similar in style, but much heavier built than this photo:

 

Image result for tripod screw type bumper jack"

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Well I don't have any of the jacks shown here , but I am happy to say I do have a excellent original Chrysler pedal car like the one picture that the little kid is working on.

Possible future plan is to take the trunk off my 1930 Packard touring and then put the pedal car in its place on the trunk rack and strap it down . 😊 I told my son I would do that and he didn't seemed to be to amused.

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On ‎11‎/‎15‎/‎2019 at 10:51 PM, Wowabunga said:

1)  Set handbrake and remove your brain.... you won't need it because "sanity" is not required to change a flat using this "rim jack" a style popular in the early 1940's.  Packard, Studebaker and Cadillac also used a near identical setup.

 

The jacks were only used for a year or two and are somewhat hard to find.  The accompanying "stand" is many times harder to find fyi.

 

 

rimjacks.jpg

One of my favorite stories, told to me by my father about the 'old days' with his '41 Super Sedan was putting it up for the upstate New York winter in his father-in-law's large garage out back of the house.  He would drive it into the garage, getting it as parallel as he could with the back wall of the garage, and then jack the car up by putting a standard bumper jack on the rear bumper.  Claimed what he would do is then simply kick the Buick off the jack, towards the wall and then repeat that until the car was up against the wall.  For once, bumper jack instability worked to his advantage, although I have a hard time figuring out how that would work with the Buick jack shown in these pictures.  I do note, however, that he never told me how he would then get the car out in the spring... . 

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As to kicking off the jack to move sideways, you can do that with an aluminum racing jack.

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They do kill... Not sure what kind of auto jack my grandfather's best friend was using but he was far too young to go at 36.

IMG_20191130_111920699~2.jpg

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How about one more for the road.  I've watched parts vendors describe the flat horizontal surface area of the standard bumper jack as "The Shelf" or as some people call it "The Perch".   This is the part that slides and rests under the bumper.

 

The 1948 Studebaker Commander came with the factory jack as pictured below.  It doesn't have a "perch" or a "shelf" rather by golly it has in my opinion what amounts to nothing more than "A Slippery Slope".   To the benefit of the Studebaker Engineering Department they did put a nice little nipple in the middle of their slippery slope that matches up perfectly with a hole somewhere in the bottom side of the  bumper.  Skiing in the French Alps comes immediately to mind.

 

Now as far as that shallow, poor fitting, ill fitting and very much lacking base plate goes... and I really don't even want to go there.... but it's my calling:  I nostalgically reminisce back to my childhood toys and those catchy Tv commercials:  "Weebles Wobble but They Don't Fall Down...!"  This jack will not stand upright on it's own no matter how hard you try it just wobbles and topples over.

 

48_StudbakerCom_Weeble.jpg

Edited by Wowabunga (see edit history)

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This is probably safe but certainly is the worst jack that I have ever had to work with since my 1953 Buick bumper jack. Two Hyundai Sonatas '07 170,000 Kms and '08 79,000 Kms and the first flat on a non antique car since 1972.  Our Sonata now has a real floor jack in the trunk.

Or maybe could it just have been old age?😀😀

page.h68.jpg

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