Wowabunga

The 7 Most Dangerous & Unlucky OEM Jacks

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9 minutes ago, Jubilee said:

Those bumper jacks also doubled as jumper cables

 

You are going to have to elaborate more on this statement...  a video demo preferred...

jumpercables_fire.jpg

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Do you crave adventure and danger... because next up we have the "FRICTION POLE" bumper jack style.   From 1935 thru 1941 the major automakers switched over to this style jack.  The principle is the same as those employed by acrobatic pole dancers... just add rain and or snow and enjoy the show.

 

Who ever wrote the copy for this GM De Luxe Accessory Jack was shooting for the moon...!

30s_Universal_user_modiol** copy.jpg

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'01 Mercedes Stick-It-In jack. Square bore so does not twist easily and a socket for each wheel.

 

01jack.jpg

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20 hours ago, Wowabunga said:

 

What year is your Crosley Jim ?    The post screw jack was popular mid 1930's and then at the end of the 1930's the "Friction Post" came into popularity.  Here's some literature from Walker... All jacks said to easily lift 1 ton.  SMH...!!!

 

Crosley used variation of the same jack from 39-52. The jack I showed I believe was the last variation. Hard to believe but the earlier ones used a round base that was even smaller.

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Which of these 3 jacks would be the first to put you in a hospital ?.

 

I'm not a scientist... but I know what gravity is and these are dangerous.  I'd rather play with knives...

 

 

playingknives3x.jpg

Edited by Wowabunga (see edit history)

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On 11/13/2019 at 9:14 AM, Wowabunga said:

 

You are going to have to elaborate more on this statement...  a video demo preferred...

jumpercables_fire.jpg

Bumper jacks were commonly used as jumper cables in the fifties ( in my experience) as automatic transmissions became more common. If you think about it for 10 seconds, you’ll figure it out. I’ll give you a hint: if polarity of vehicles was different you needed two bumper jacks, other wise one.

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Only if on a conductive surface.

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2 hours ago, Jubilee said:

If you think about it for 10 seconds, you’ll figure it out. 

 

Ok so you kiss 💋 bumpers.  Grab a towel or gloves and say a few hail Marys... Got it..!!!

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1)  Set handbrake and remove your brain.... you won't need it because "sanity" is not required to change a flat using this "rim jack" a style popular in the early 1940's.  Packard, Studebaker and Cadillac also used a near identical setup.

 

The jacks were only used for a year or two and are somewhat hard to find.  The accompanying "stand" is many times harder to find fyi.

 

 

rimjacks.jpg

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OK so the Buick is just like a Citreon except for the air ride. Raise car, insert jackstand, lower car on stand, remove jack, remove tire. Or does the tire remove with the jack which can be used to break the bead ?

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5 hours ago, Pfeil said:

Image result for Image of a VW Beetle jack

 

Straight out of a Hollywood Science Fiction feature film...!  Thanks for posting.

 

Had not yet decided which jack would be crowned the most dangerous.  This jack to me is the most complicated looking.  This friction pole principle is the very same that was used in the middle 1930's and featured earlier in my series only this jack pictured has no outer shell and the inner workings are wide open to view.  Spill a few drops of motor oil on this by mistake and you'll soon see what a real mistake looks like.

 

I assume this is a VW or Mercedes jack probably made by the Bilstein Company.

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1 hour ago, Wowabunga said:

 

Straight out of a Hollywood Science Fiction feature film...!  Thanks for posting.

 

Had not yet decided which jack would be crowned the most dangerous.  This jack to me is the most complicated looking.  This friction pole principle is the very same that was used in the middle 1930's and featured earlier in my series only this jack pictured has no outer shell and the inner workings are wide open to view.  Spill a few drops of motor oil on this by mistake and you'll soon see what a real mistake looks like.

 

I assume this is a VW or Mercedes jack probably made by the Bilstein Company.

 

 

 

Yes, VW Porsche and many German cars. The jack works well in itself but because it jacks the whole side of the car up, and also if the car is not absolutely on a level ground it will twist off / round off the square jacking point or sill panel Actually a square shank.

65T1-28.jpg

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The caboose on this "train wreck waiting to happen" display of dangerous OEM jacks goes to a post war Morgan automobile... Need I say more.

 

Be safe and go buy a small hydraulic jack for your trunk... they come with nice carrying cases too.  If you have any photos to add to this short history on auto jacks please post away.  Happy Motoring...!

 

 

Morgan($123).JPG

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Don't forget, leave the lug nuts loose.

Tightening those is not part of changing a tire.

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On 11/12/2019 at 9:51 PM, Wowabunga said:

 

What year is your Crosley Jim ?    The post screw jack was popular mid 1930's and then at the end of the 1930's the "Friction Post" came into popularity.  Here's some literature from Walker... All jacks said to easily lift 1 ton.  SMH...!!!

1939ad_Walker copy.JPG

 

 

All of these are widow makers. 

 

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For my smaller cars, I have a couple of these. Generally lift on the lower A-Arm (IFS/IRS) or shock mount since lifts the tire directly without lifting the body first.

 

Still say the best use of a bumper jack is as a bead breaker.

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They do indeed make very good jumper cables.

 Just touch the bumpers of the two cars together and place the jack on top of the positive battery terminals and you are go to go!

 

 Note, does not work well with modern plastic bumpers.

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4 minutes ago, Roger Walling said:

They do indeed make very good jumper cables.

 Just touch the bumpers of the two cars together and place the jack on top of the positive battery terminals and you are go to go!

 

 Note, does not work well with modern plastic bumpers.

 

I've seen this done with older cars that have steel bumpers for ground continuity, but they used a coat hanger between the positive poles.  Instructions: get cars close, insert coat hanger between positive battery posts of the two cars, stand back, nudge cars together until sparks noted at the bumper, attempt to start stalled car.

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"attempt to start stalled car" - you left off "watch coat hanger turn cherry red".

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I bought an '86 Jaguar XJS V12 that the owner claimed had a a bad relay that was very expensive (about 40 bucks). Snaked up through the console was a piece of 12/3 Romex with the wires stripped back a couple of inches. There was a glove on the passenger seat, just one, for the right hand. He told me to be sure to wear the glove when I pinched the wires together to start it. Yes, they got hot too. I am pretty sure the wire and the glove is out there in my souvenir drawer.

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8 hours ago, padgett said:

"attempt to start stalled car" - you left off "watch coat hanger turn cherry red".

I didn't get to see what actually happened to the coat hanger.  I was next door on my front porch waiting for the next command: "Hey, hold my beer and watch this".

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