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A BUICK THAT I'VE ALWAS LIKED


Dynaflash8
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I've had several 1946-1949 Buick Specials, and my Uncle drove a 1942 Special sedanette until the mid-1950's.  His was two-tone green and I really liked the color.  In 1953 I bought a 1947 Special sedanette and gave it to my future father-in-law.  Traded a 1947 Plymounth convertible with a bad engine for it.  Later I bought a  used-up 1947 Special 4-dr fastback in Washington, DC and traded it in on a pretty good 1948 Special 4dr fastback sedan.  These cars weren't a lot of car for a Buick, but they were still good looking and two  years of them were quite rare.  Of course the 1942 was rare, and the wartime version still rarer, but did you know that the Special was not marketed in 1946 until extremely late in the year.  There were only about 1600 sedanettes and 1700 sedans built as 1946 models.  The 1947 was up around 14,000 and the 1948 was still more. But, now, did  you know that the new 1949 Special was only built until May 1949 and production only amounted to about 5,000 of each model (haven't checked the exact numbers for the 46S and the 41 series).  Then, the new 1950 Special was introduced in I think June 1949.  So, if you are looking for a rarer Buick built after the War, consider  a Special.  They are even rarer that a 1949 Riviera!  But, then again, does anybody really care?  😀  25 or 30  years ago these little pre-War looking Specials were cheap.  Now, for some reason, they are considerably more expensive.  Go figure.  BCA #55

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Earl, thanks so much for what you wrote MOST interesting indeed. I never heard of that before. It is interesting to read what the auto makers had planned to get cars out to the public after such a long time span

with no car production due to commitment for war work. My grand parents bought a new Oldsmobile 98 sedan in 1948 and had to pay a premium as even then new cars were still hard to get .

Walt

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Thanks, Earl.

 I have never seen a "new" 1949 Special that I know of. But then, one would have to look at the data plate to know, I suppose.  From what I have read, it became the 1950 Special. SAME car.    Does anyone know if there are visual differences?

 'course, I did not know until Ames that the '46 to '49 Special looked so much alike .  First glance they all look like a '42. Until the "new" '49.

 

  Ben

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The '49 Buick Special was among the very last 1942 B-Body fastback models with minor postwar trim changes still produced into calendar year 1949.   Those 1946-'49 Specials were the lowest production series for those year unlike the pre-war years.  Production allocation decisions driven by the certain knowledge of pent-up demand  resulted in savvy marketing favoring the Super and Roadmaster, both which were higher unit profit series.   It was very smart to do that, when the seller's market ended, more Buick owners had been moved up the model hierarchy and the all-new 1950 Special enticed a new generation of customers into their first Buick Special.

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On 11/7/2019 at 5:06 PM, Ben Bruce aka First Born said:

Thanks, Earl.

 I have never seen a "new" 1949 Special that I know of. But then, one would have to look at the data plate to know, I suppose.  From what I have read, it became the 1950 Special. SAME car.    Does anyone know if there are visual differences?

 'course, I did not know until Ames that the '46 to '49 Special looked so much alike .  First glance they all look like a '42. Until the "new" '49.

 

  Ben

They were completely different.  The new Special introduced mid-year had the same snaggle-tooth look of all of the rest of the 1950 Buicks, introduced at the normal time.  The 1949 Special looked exactly like the  1948 Special, which looked like the 1947 Special except for some stainless strip  belt moldings that weren't on the 1947 model.  Currently there is a 1949 Special for sale on eBay cars for sale (located in E. Palatka, FL).  Also, the nose emblem was metal in 1947 and plastic in 1948-49.  And, you're right, you have to look at the data plate on the firewall to know a 1949 from a 1948.  I wrote an article for the AACA magazine back in the 90's (I think it was the 90's) called "The Little Buick Nobody Knows).

Edited by Dynaflash8 (see edit history)
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