Jump to content

MJC classics in Lakeland, FL BIG swindle !


Recommended Posts

If you are in the process of buying a car from them or have a car on consignment with them better call the Lakeland, FL police.  I was just on the phone with them this afternoon and evidently my 49 Buick I bought (and titled) from them was resold by them a couple more times after I titled it. They have impounded 85 cars he had in the shop and are trying to sort out the real owners right now.  Too many "owners" claiming the same vehicle. The swindle is approaching 9 million right now. Lots of money sent to buy a car and no car shipped.  Lots of cars sold and no money sent out from consignment sales to owners. The owner was arrested. Michael Calhoun.  Was also on the phone with the rep from the FL DMV handling the case to prove my ownership (title) and he let me in on the details. Doors have been shuttered and barricaded. Cars locked down. All records seized.  If anyone needs the contact number of the detectives handling the case send me a PM. I can also give you the number of the person handling the title searches for the FL DMV if your wondering if you actually own the car you "bought".  

Edited by Brooklyn Beer (see edit history)
  • Like 6
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow!  Thank you for alerting us.

I have looked at their website on occasion, and

always thought they had nice looking cars,

even if they were often a bit overpriced.

 

Dedicated car owners help each other and 

look out for each others' welfare.  This alone

helps to weed out the fraudsters.  Thanks again.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Evidently the crap just hit the fan with records seizure.   Detective said she was really overwhelmed by the sheer number of fraudulent sales being found and was happy they could clear one off the books.  Very lucky I am it sounds like. But most of the shenanigans evidently started the last 5-6 months.  They know of at least 3 people that "bought" my Buick at this point, funds transferred.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pretty sure that was the dealer that listed

Earl Beauchamp's 1939 Buick phaeton for sale.

(The car and its pricing were widely discussed on

our forum.)  I don't know, however, whether Earl

actually sold the car through that dealership.

Maybe someone should alert Earl "Dynaflash8".

 

This is the dealer involved, is it not?

http://www.mjcclassiccars.com/

I notice that the website is still up.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is another good example of why I always prefer to deal one on one, directly with a private seller,  rather than with any middle man who's primary motivaton is profit. Dealers have rent, overhead, payroll and many other expenses to meet that just don't come into play when purchasing privately. I'm sure there are many honest dealers out there, but a single crooked dealership like this can do a lot of damage.

I hope all those involved find a pathway to recover their losses.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Why did you post that link? I don't think Earl actually confirmed there that the sale went though this MLC dealer.

 

Well I guess this dealer did do the sale for him, he got his money, less the agreed upon commission. We can infer that, though I don't think Earl explicitly said so.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, GregLaR said:

This is another good example of why I always prefer to deal one on one, directly with a private seller,  rather than with any middle man who's primary motivaton is profit. Dealers have rent, overhead, payroll and many other expenses to meet that just don't come into play when purchasing privately. I'm sure there are many honest dealers out there, but a single crooked dealership like this can do a lot of damage.

I hope all those involved find a pathway to recover their losses.

 

You mean watch out for brokers. People who sell others cars are not dealers. Dealers buy and own their own cars. Brokers sell other peoples cars. Dealers are licensed by the state, have to carry insurance, have to have a bond to protect customers from activity like this. Dealers are inspected, cannot be felons, and have to follow a code of conduct. Brokers, third party sellers and individuals do not have to do any of this. You are better off to buy from a dealer than anybody else. A dealer is in business to sell over and over again. Individuals can lie all they want and often do. After all they are just selling one car. Brokers can lie as well saying things like "my client this" or "my client that". Then if you had a problem they can blame the client for bad information. This guy was not a dealer if he was selling other peoples cars. He was a broker.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Full brick and mortar facility complete with a fully equipped repair department. Owner statement claims they purchase and sell their own cars as well as consigning others.

I think that's a pretty clear description of a dealership in any language.

 

dealer crook.jpg

dealer crook2.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, GregLaR said:

Full brick and mortar facility complete with a fully equipped repair department. Owner statement claims they purchase and sell their own cars as well as consigning others.

I think that's a pretty clear description of a dealership in any language.

 

dealer crook.jpg

dealer crook2.jpg

 

Consignment shop. They sell others cars. This is why consigning or brokering others cars should be illegal. 

Edited by Brass is Best (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Brass is Best said:

 

Consignment shop. They sell others cars. This is why consigning or brokering others cars should be illegal. 

BiB,

           Forgive me if I'm missing something here, and perhaps it's just semantics, but this reads exactly like a dealership, even by your own description, to me. 

This is a direct quote from their website:

(the high-lighting is theirs)

We have expanded over the last eight years to include selling quality consignment cars alongside our owned cars. With each car I buy and resell, a little more of my childhood years come to life. I only deal in the nicest cars, ones that leave my ownership repaired and ready for the next owner to turn the key and enjoy. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope Earl was paid what he was owed but if the sale of the car through this schiester took place the last 6 months it would be the exception.  

 

Why are we arguing apples and oranges? Does it really matter what the wording is on a crooks website? He was a POS and stole peoples money. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, GregLaR said:

BiB,

           Forgive me if I'm missing something here, and perhaps it's just semantics, but this reads exactly like a dealership, even by your own description, to me. 

This is a direct quote from their website:

(the high-lighting is theirs)

We have expanded over the last eight years to include selling quality consignment cars alongside our owned cars. With each car I buy and resell, a little more of my childhood years come to life. I only deal in the nicest cars, ones that leave my ownership repaired and ready for the next owner to turn the key and enjoy. 

 

A true dealer dose not consign or sell cars they do not own. That is what brokers and consignment shops do.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Backtrack - there is nothing wrong with consignment (especially when the consignor is also a licensed dealer) - it allows the owner much higher price for the car (ie avoids the 40% to 60% +/- discount right off the top).  

 

Dishonesty is what dishonesty is and it can appear in any type of business - that is the key problem right and I am sure I have never heard about any dishonest dealer ? 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a Miami FL. guy that was a top salesman for one of the premier Porsche dealerships in the country. He took orders for one of the most sought after factory Porsche models and left with the deposits. Maybe it the Florida cool aid that causing the problem.

 

https://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/broward/article235164347.html

 

Lash

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Dynaflash8 said:

You never give your title to one of these dealers.  A BCA member found me in the BCA Roster and contacted me direct.  Together we both came out okay in the nick of time apparently.

Good for you Earl.  I was told by the detective working this that my car was resold at least a couple times after I had it and they wanted to be sure I actually got it. He also tried to cancel the title once according the FL DMV                              AFTER I HAD THE CAR              No clue what this guy was thinking.    But lucky I am so far and hope it holds.   All the paperwork is in order.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have bought from brokers, including at least one that often list cars on this website. I have always had good luck and have been pleased with my purchases. Real estate is typically sold by brokers and no one complains. Just because one is a licensed car dealer doesn't make them necessarily credible or legitimate. There are plenty of licensed and crooked car dealers out there.

 

Remember, just because a "licensed dealer" has a fancy building and a stacked inventory of expensive cars, doesn't mean he actually owns the building or his inventory. Owning a car doesn't always mean owning a car. He could be completely upside down in credit lines, loan sharks and/or private, business and personal loans because he needs to keep his doors open and his inventory stocked. These situations never work out well. We have certainly seen the results of these situations  in the antique car world over the years. Any of us who have been in the hobby for years can certainly name a few dealers who had bitter endings.

 

Anyone can be a crook-a local car club member, a licensed dealer, even a family member. Know what you are buying and who you are buying it from and you don't need to worry. Be aware and be intelligent. Smart shoppers make smart buyers and typically own great cars.

 

Edited by rusty12 (see edit history)
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I would take this case to "the lug nut judge" mentioned in another topic a few days ago. That was the judge who ruled putting lug nuts on was not part of rotating tires. This dealer/broker has been charged with theft of Florida's sales tax money. Florida never had it to steal.

 

Around here a car lot's inventory could be construed as brokerships since the majority of cars are floor planned by the dealer auction house, a bank, or a credit union. Very few cars are owned by a dealer. They just pay the monthly interest. Reach a limit and if the car doesn't sell it goes back into the pool.

 

As far as getting swindled, I would be more worried about my own thinking than a dealer. I have talked myself into buying some real joaners........ but I cleaned them up and sold them.

 

Telling a guy you will send him $62,000 for a collector Buick and send the car when you get the check doesn't elicit a whole lot of sympathy from me when I hear car car didn't get there. I'd like the guy's contact info. I'm pretty sure he needs a high efficiency furnace and some solar panels "that will pay for themselves".

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I spoke once to the shop owner (the alleged swindler),

and never got the impression that he was dishonest.

The text on his website makes him seem sincere.

 

However, if he has cheated car owners each for tens of

thousands of dollars, into the millions, he has been doing it

for quite a while.  It makes one think that, if he's so 

crooked, the representations of his cars might not be

honest either.

 

Too bad.  We can always use more good, honest people

in this hobby!

Link to post
Share on other sites

The first time anyone gets cheated like this they should immediately make a complaint.

 

If it's a business complain to the state Attorney General Office, your county district attorney, and law enforcement.

 

Written complaints by mail. Fraud is a serious crime. It should not take long to put a stop to it.

 

Apparently this dragged on for quite a while. It shouldn't have. I get the impression victims were lazy. Leaving phone messages to the business that were not returned. That is not the way to handle it.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

If it's a business complain to the state Attorney General Office, your county district attorney, and law enforcement.

 

 

once had a co out in Wash state take 10k of my money.............. they used it and didnt return it for 6 months! (I bought Platinum- or lack thereof)

 

the offices you mentioned were contacted and nobody cared. to my knowledge, that co is still operating today- using other peoples money and then replacing it with newcomers $.

 

states cant keep up with all of the thieves out there.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

25 years ago I was the victim of a credit card fraud amounting to almost $10,000. I collected all the pertinent information - which included copies of the fraudulent documents - and took them to the RI State police (since I live in RI). Their reaction..."this isn't enough money for us to be bothered with."

 

My credit was completely ruined for about 20 years. Now, when the State Police call looking for a donation, I hang up on them.

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a bad experience with Gateway Classic Cars which is another consignment place. I looked them up on the BBB website and read several horror stories from people who had a much worse (and more costly) experience than I did. Now whenever I'm thinking about dealing with a business that I'm not familiar with I always check them out on the BBB site first and I suggest that you people do the same....

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Be careful about lumping all the people in a given profession into the same group with a guy who is a criminal.

 

Whatever job you guys all do, I'm quite confident that there are members of that profession who have ripped people off. That doesn't mean you're a crook, too, just because you do that job.

  • Like 16
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 6 months later...
On 11/5/2019 at 8:18 PM, Brooklyn Beer said:

If you are in the process of buying a car from them or have a car on consignment with them better call the Lakeland, FL police....

They have impounded 85 cars he had in the shop and are trying to sort out the real owners right now....  

 

Brooklyn (or anyone else):  Do you know what has

become of the cars involved?  Some, you say, were

sold more than once.  I assume others never found owners.

 

If there are unsold cars, what has happened to them?

Is there going to be an auction of the remaining vehicles?

It might be a good thing for car fans to know about.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Have not heard anything for months. For me that is a good thing.  All I know is when I sent the state of FL DMV person handling the cars they had seized my title work from TX, he informed me numerous people were contacting him and the police saying they had bought the same car in his inventory as many other people and that the Buick I bought had been resold at least twice by claims.  That happened months after I had possession. That the original owner of my car claims he had only been paid 1/2 the promised money yet had signed the title over prior and has a lawsuit against them.  Nobody has ever contacted me claiming ownership. Title is in my name and has been long before this shit show started. Title previous when I changed it to me was in the dealers name and FL DMV told me the previous owner had tried to cancel that title from MN.  Car stays in a locked garage with a kill switch and security camera on it as I am sure by now whomever says they own it knows where it is.  I keep wondering when a letter from a lawyer will show up. When that happens it will get moved across the street to my neighbors garage.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/11/2019 at 10:34 AM, Matt Harwood said:

Be careful about lumping all the people in a given profession into the same group with a guy who is a criminal.

 

Whatever job you guys all do, I'm quite confident that there are members of that profession who have ripped people off. That doesn't mean you're a crook, too, just because you do that job.

I agree with Matt Harwood, one top notch guy right here, sold 2 cars for me last year. I couldn't have been   happier, they aren't all bad

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Brooklyn Beer said:

Not me pointing any fingers. I am a plumber and if there ever was a bunch of schiesters that give the trade a bad name then it would be house plumbers. Big  reason I do only commercial work in hospitals and schools.


It’s all the trades. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Brooklyn Beer said:

We have a mechanic in town who has been there 28 years I guess. He fixes appliances on the side. Except Sundays as he is also the pastor. Shop has a waiting list. 


We have a plumber/electrician/pastor that shows up on a lot of jobs I am on. Rumor is the church would be bankrupt if he didn’t live off of the agreed upon pastor salary and have all checks for his work made out to the church. Insanely good guy. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Brooklyn Beer said:

Except Sundays as he is also the pastor.

 

I did  work trade with a pastor named DeAngelo once.

I rebuilt his engine, he painted my car.

He had some kid scuff it for him, including every shiny piece. All the stainless, door handles, bumpers, grill, GLASS....

WHAT A HACK !!!!

His comment? Stand back some, you wont notice it so much.

Yup, ALL professions.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/14/2020 at 4:32 PM, Brooklyn Beer said:

Have not heard anything for months. For me that is a good thing.  All I know is when I sent the state of FL DMV person handling the cars they had seized my title work from TX, he informed me numerous people were contacting him and the police saying they had bought the same car in his inventory as many other people and that the Buick I bought had been resold at least twice by claims.  That happened months after I had possession. That the original owner of my car claims he had only been paid 1/2 the promised money yet had signed the title over prior and has a lawsuit against them.  Nobody has ever contacted me claiming ownership. Title is in my name and has been long before this shit show started. Title previous when I changed it to me was in the dealers name and FL DMV told me the previous owner had tried to cancel that title from MN.  Car stays in a locked garage with a kill switch and security camera on it as I am sure by now whomever says they own it knows where it is.  I keep wondering when a letter from a lawyer will show up. When that happens it will get moved across the street to my neighbors garage.

 

 

Sorry for your troubles...and anxiety, but it sounds to me like you're covered legally.  I sold an old S-10 Chevy a couple of years ago, and the cops called me a few months later to say they were conducting a fraud investigation against the guy who bought my truck (for resale.) A flip for him. He paid cash, so no problem there, but I forgot to have my wife sign the title (both of our names were on it.) I called the buyer immediately after I sold him the truck but he said, "don't worry about it." He apparently forged my wife's signature...but that was the least of his worries. I was nervous that I'd get another call from the cops about that truck but I never did.

Edited by JamesR (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...