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MICKTHEDIG

Death on the Bonham’s London to Brighton Veteran Car Run

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Really sad to hear of a death on the Bonham’s London to Brighton Veteran Car Run. 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/nov/04/m23-crash-vintage-car-driver-killed-in-lorry-collision

 

I once followed the run in my modern car, every one was having so much fun and great to see these old cars on the road and not just in a museums.    

 

My condolences to everybody involved. 

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Apologies if I seemed abrupt before, any death of an enthusiast is a blow to us all.

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The regretful news was brought to our attention

earlier in another thread.  Thank you for alerting us also.

 

 

 

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Lets be mindful that car enthusiast's are lost every day in modern cars.  If I go at age 80 doing what I love and bypass a terminal stint in a nursing home i'll have no regrets.  Prayers for the family and injured wife.

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There is risk involved in ANYTHING we do. Simply a fact of life. The worst risk of all is to hide away in a concrete bunker somewhere, afraid of injury, hurt, loss of any kind. And in reality, one would lose out on all the wonderful experiences that make life worth breathing for. Whether it is skiing, boating, racing cars, visiting historic sites of the world, even driving a hundred year old car to get an ice cream cone? Enjoying life is all about risks. 

I hesitate to make the remark that "At least he died doing what he enjoyed"? To me, it is a bit trite, and could be considered in poor taste with grieving family and friends. However, the truth is, I wouldn't mind being killed while driving my antique racing car at a ridiculous speed on some winding back road. At least it would mean I was doing what I enjoyed.

 

Some years back, likely about 20 to 25 years ago, I read an article put out by one of the antique automobile insurance companies. They were responding to concerns about antique car safety after one of those bad years where several serious accidents had happened. I don't recall the exact numbers, but essentially they were saying that statistically, mile for mile, people were safer in their antique (they were talking about real antiques say about 1932 or before), than they were in their modern car. They gave several reasons for this. In spite of poor brakes, total lack of safety equipment including no seat-belts. Antique automobile hobbyists tended to be cautious with their old cars. They tended to drive roads less traveled, less traffic and exposure to the crazies in a big hurry. And even when there was a wreck, due to the lower speeds, damages and injuries tended to be less severe.

We should ALL embrace life every day. Spend time with good people, enjoy a country drive. 

And when a terrible event occurs? Take time to comfort the family and close friends in their time of grief. Regardless of the circumstances, such a personal loss is quite difficult. People by their very nature want to ask "WHY?" Sadly, sometimes, there simply is no good answer.

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3 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

There is risk involved in ANYTHING we do. Simply a fact of life. The worst risk of all is to hide away in a concrete bunker somewhere, afraid of injury, hurt, loss of any kind. And in reality, one would lose out on all the wonderful experiences that make life worth breathing for. Whether it is skiing, boating, racing cars, visiting historic sites of the world, even driving a hundred year old car to get an ice cream cone? Enjoying life is all about risks. 

I hesitate to make the remark that "At least he died doing what he enjoyed"? To me, it is a bit trite, and could be considered in poor taste with grieving family and friends. However, the truth is, I wouldn't mind being killed while driving my antique racing car at a ridiculous speed on some winding back road. At least it would mean I was doing what I enjoyed.

 

The tragic death of Ron is a huge loss to the vintage car and truck community here in Alberta. 

 

Most of us knew him personally and he will be genuinely missed by all of us.  You are correct in that he loved restoring, driving and enjoying vintage cars and trucks.   He had a huge collection of restored trucks with some rarities including a Rumely, a couple of links of different ones here:

 

https://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/forum/your-studebaker-forum/stove-huggers-the-non-studebaker-forum/67131-orphan-of-the-day-09-20-1923-kelly-springfield

 

https://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/forum/your-studebaker-forum/stove-huggers-the-non-studebaker-forum/61155-orphan-of-the-day-03-03-1911-pierce-arrow

 

https://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/forum/your-studebaker-forum/stove-huggers-the-non-studebaker-forum/61128-orphan-of-the-day-03-02-1914-rumely

 

Craig

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How did this happen? How did event organizers allow an ancient car with a nearly-as-ancient driver to wander onto a busy highway? I'm horrified by this accident and feel awful for his friends and family. But how wrong did things have to go for him to end up where he did in that car?

 

I'll admit I have never participated in the London-to-Brighton Run, but do they just turn 115-year-old cars loose on the road to find their own way? Are there markings along the way? Spotters? Cars that run interference for these ancient 20 MPH machines to prevent them from having to fight with modern traffic? I have so many unanswered questions.

 

This seems like a preventable tragedy. Did someone drop the ball or was this SOP for the LtB Run?

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I didn't know Ron personally but I spoke to him on the phone a few times when looking for parts for my 1918 Packard 2 ton. He always came across as a very down to earth and dedicated old truck guy.

And a significant benefactor to the WW1 vintage Packard army truck restoration project that was undertaken by the Packard Truck Organisation headed by David Lockard in Pennsylvania over the last several years.

From what I have heard about him from others that new him he was a very dedicated vintage truck, traction engine and car guy. And very involved with making his collection accessible to the general public.

A major loss to the Western Canadian vintage landscape.

My sincere condolences to his family.

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)

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6 hours ago, 8E45E said:

He had a huge collection of restored trucks

 

Thank you for sharing.  Those trucks are wonderful.  That level of talent will be missed!!!  Any update on the condition of his wife?

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