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1913 Victor Page Engine Troubles Chart / Poster

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I have this original 1913 Victor W. Page gas engine diagnostic chart / poster:

 

"Location of Gasoline Engine Troubles Made Easy
A Comprehensive Exposition of the Common Derangements That Interfere With Efficient Operation of All Types of Four-Cycle Internal Combustion Motors"

1913, Arranged by Victor W. Page, Printed by The Norman W. Henley Publishing Co., 132 Nassau St., New York

 

It measures 38 x 24, crisp and clean, came from a hoarder estate I cleaned out some years back, everything there was stashed away when originally received new. I may be the first to open it since it was mailed out in 1913 LOL.

 

I'm interested in selling it, but I'll be darned if I can find another one out there, either for sale or sold, anywhere. There are two copies in university library collections, and that's it. I'm stumped too, because it seems Victor Page was a prolific author and authority on gas engines of all kinds for at least a decade, and his books are everywhere.

 

Any thoughts on value would be appreciated, if anyone knows of sale or auction records for an identical copy please chime in. Does the AACA have one?

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It is worth whatever anyone will pay for it.  Victor Page wrote many books on repairing automobiles.  I would be a buyer at $100.

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Victor Page wrote many automobile books, care and maintenance, explanations of the principles of design and operation. Many of the books were updated nearly every year, some of them for more than a decade. As such, many hundreds of his books are still around, in private collections, and very often for sale.

Those charts were probably usually tacked on a wall in the shop or carriage house. Probably not a lot of them survive, and especially not in that condition. If it isn't something that you particularly want? You should get it into the hands of a proper collector. How much should you ask? I do not know. As nickelroadster says, "It is worth whatever anyone will pay for it."

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I remember seeing one of these for sale on the wall in an antique shop in Pennsylvania just this year while scrounging around the week before Hershey.   It was priced at $300 and was obviously framed many years ago.  I doubt it would have sold at that price though as not being properly framed, it had sagged and it also showed heavy creasing like yours.  

 

It's basically a decorator item and would need to be professionally framed, including preparation, in order to minimize the creasing.  Just because you've not seen many doesn't mean they are especially rare.  As was pointed out, many were tacked on shop walls and soon became torn grease-covered or outlived their usefulness.  Although it's neat, and the information is interesting, the most interesting part of it is the overall appeal as a period piece of automobilia.   There may still be others, folded up inside one of the books that Page wrote, or tucked away in their original envelopes.  If you want to get a better idea of how rare it actually is, start contacting known literature dealers and listen to their advice or offers.  They will have seen far more of this kind of item than you.  Checking the internet is just one source of information, but should not be considered as the "final word."

 

IMHO It's not worth a bunch and I doubt floating it on evil-bay would bring much more than was already offered for it.  My personal recommendation is to contact the AACA Library and Research Center to see if they might be interested in receiving it as a donation. 

Best wishes and I hope it finds the right new home.

Terry

 

 

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In addition to being a prolific author Victor Page also designed and built an air cooled car that bore his name it was an "Aero type four". was built in Farmingdale, Long Island, NY. I did an article on it decades ago for the Franklin Club when I was active in that organization. 

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