sebastienbuick

car exhibition in France

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and finally, here is the oldest car there was at this exhibition .
 
De Dion Bouton 1903
 
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Here it is, good reading :) 
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Have you watched Columbo, Sebastien ?

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4 hours ago, mike6024 said:

Have you watched Columbo, Sebastien ?

 

Hello, yes I saw episodes of Columbo ;) 
and a few times, they are passing episodes of Columbo again now ;) 
Edited by sebastienbuick (see edit history)

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Such a wonderful display of historic automobiles! A bunch more to really enjoy. Thank you for the additional pictures of the '14 Renault (so  missed by a couple years?). And I particularly like the 1903 De Dion Bouton. The 1916 and 1928 Renault cars were wonderful, and I liked seeing so many early Citroen automobiles also.

Again, thank you for sharing these here.

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2 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

Such a wonderful display of historic automobiles! A bunch more to really enjoy. Thank you for the additional pictures of the '14 Renault (so  missed by a couple years?). And I particularly like the 1903 De Dion Bouton. The 1916 and 1928 Renault cars were wonderful, and I liked seeing so many early Citroen automobiles also.

Again, thank you for sharing these here.

 

Thank you very much Wayne Sheldon , I find them beautiful too ;) 
All cars present are rolling, and the De Dion Bouton 1903 has even participate in a rally (very large walk, cross France, ...)
It is with pleasure that I share these photos :) 
And if next year someone comes to the south of France, it will be a pleasure to see car show, ... :) 
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That is a very well-done display and presentation.  It looks 'permanent', like a museum display; not only for a week or however long it is.  A ton of work must have gone in organizing, setting up, and then have to dismantle it when its over.

 

Craig

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17 hours ago, 8E45E said:

That is a very well-done display and presentation.  It looks 'permanent', like a museum display; not only for a week or however long it is.  A ton of work must have gone in organizing, setting up, and then have to dismantle it when its over.

 

Craig

 

Yes indeed it took a lot of work. We must already calculate how to dispose of these 71 cars in a room, put the banners, print the presentation sheet for each car, make a staging with manequins, stored each vehicle by category / year / mark.
You must also make leaflets, ask the town hall, ... :) 

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My '59 Peugeot 403, quirky as it was, was very dear to me. 
I remember the light switch which was on a stalk, positioned where the turn signal arm is on domestic cars.  That resulted too many times in accidentally shutting off the lights when preparing to make a turn.  And the little brass part of the clutch linkage which gave way without warning, leaving me clutchless in downtown D. C.   The aluminum pop rivets holding the headlights in, which eroded away and caused the headlight to pop out, and so on.  It was also hell on heads (hemi), I used up 3 because they cracked between the valve seats and the spark plug hole.  That once caused a surprise popping out of a spark plug, leaving a dent in the hood.  And rust?  You bet.  I held the underside of its unit body together with angle iron until it became hopeless.
But despite it all I got 175 thousand miles out of the 403, loving it because it had a certain charm.   Great looks, reputedly a P. Farina design,  rack and pinion steering making it the best handling car I've ever had, and the overdrive 4th gear and the sun roof were favorite features.   The front seat backs reclined all the way down, I slept in it at Hershey when you could park on Hershey Park Drive a number of times.  Sadly, the tin worm won out causing its demise.  Shown is what is left.

MVC-250S.JPG

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39 minutes ago, Dave Henderson said:

My '59 Peugeot 403, quirky as it was, was very dear to me. 
I remember the light switch which was on a stalk, positioned where the turn signal arm is on domestic cars.  That resulted too many times in accidentally shutting off the lights when preparing to make a turn.  And the little brass part of the clutch linkage which gave way without warning, leaving me clutchless in downtown D. C.   The aluminum pop rivets holding the headlights in, which eroded away and caused the headlight to pop out, and so on.  It was also hell on heads (hemi), I used up 3 because they cracked between the valve seats and the spark plug hole.  That once caused a surprise popping out of a spark plug, leaving a dent in the hood.  And rust?  You bet.  I held the underside of its unit body together with angle iron until it became hopeless.
But despite it all I got 175 thousand miles out of the 403, loving it because it had a certain charm.   Great looks, reputedly a P. Farina design,  rack and pinion steering making it the best handling car I've ever had, and the overdrive 4th gear and the sun roof were favorite features.   The front seat backs reclined all the way down, I slept in it at Hershey when you could park on Hershey Park Drive a number of times.  Sadly, the tin worm won out causing its demise.  Shown is what is left.

MVC-250S.JPG

 

 

Indeed each vehicle is their little defect but we like them anyway.
I heard several people give good advice on this car, it was a good car ;) 
This piece of 403 that you have is full of memories :) 

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47 minutes ago, Dave Henderson said:

My '59 Peugeot 403, quirky as it was, was very dear to me.   Great looks, reputedly a P. Farina design, 

MVC-250S.JPG

I'm not sure if the 403 had any P. Farina design influence, but the 404 certainly was a PF design.  It has a strong resemblance to BMC's range of Farina-body cars; especially the Austin Cambridge and Morris Oxford from 1959.

 

Craig

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6 hours ago, 8E45E said:

I'm not sure if the 403 had any P. Farina design influence, but the 404 certainly was a PF design.  It has a strong resemblance to BMC's range of Farina-body cars; especially the Austin Cambridge and Morris Oxford from 1959.

 

Craig

 

Hello, here is a link where there is all the description of the 403, and we can see in the "Technical" section, that they say that the Peugeot 403 was realized by Peugeot in colloboration with Pininfarina ;) 
 
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