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Barker Motor Company


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Mroz lists two Barker trucks...

1911-13 in North LA Calif, no company name listed;; no delivery units mentioned (often car sized)...this may be The Barker Motor Truck Co, lLos Angeles, sted as a m'f'r that  that announced a truck but questionable as to if ever actually produced per Auto'ble Qtly...Georgano's little book lists this as Barker Motors Co...

The C. L Barker Co in Norwalk, Conn, 1912-17. did produce   1/2 tons and other models; m'f'r  sometimes listed as just C. L. Barker...

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A lot of early 20th Century truck manufacturers were small, local entities who made their own frames, but used proprietary running gear, and other operating hardware including brakes, instruments, etc. Their target sales area may have been only a 50 to 100 mile radius from where their factory was located.  Barker must have been one of the locals that never sold nationwide.

 

Craig

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On 11/3/2019 at 1:20 PM, Bud Tierney said:

Mroz lists two Barker trucks...

1911-13 in North LA Calif, no company name listed;; no delivery units mentioned (often car sized)...this may be The Barker Motor Truck Co, lLos Angeles, sted as a m'f'r that  that announced a truck but questionable as to if ever actually produced per Auto'ble Qtly...Georgano's little book lists this as Barker Motors Co...

The C. L Barker Co in Norwalk, Conn, 1912-17. did produce   1/2 tons and other models; m'f'r  sometimes listed as just C. L. Barker...

Further to that, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Trucks and Buses by Denis Miller stated the C.L. Barker truck range consisted of chain-drive chassis with capacities of up to 5080kg.  By 1914, they were replaced with a worm-drive 1-ton, and later joined by a 2-ton model.

 

The 'other' Barker Motors from Los Angeles offered both a 3 and 5 ton truck on a 150 inch wheelbase powered by a 40hp 4 cylinder gasoline engine, and offered in van, open, and stake bodies.

 

Craig

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I'm not familiar with Dennis's Ency; I'll have to Google it...

Mroz agrees as to the Los Angeles Barker, but is a bit different as to the Norwalk Barker...

Doesn't mention original chain drive, says "several" models produced from 1/2 to 5 Tons, states their "wide  model range" did not sell well. that in 1914 only the "lightest" (???) model was produced with the new worm drive, and the 2T  with  137 WB came out in 1915...

Mroz's terminology leaves uncertain whether he meant the 2T was worm drive......

The 'bible" of old trucks, generally considered the most thorough,  has been Georgano's World Truck Ency, his Big Book  (not to be confused with his "little book" which is names, addresses, years and capcities/types) which I've never been willing to write a check for, but if you're anywhere near a good public library they should have a reference copy...

Should the chassis be there , and not fit anything mentioned, the trade journals (The Comm'l Vehicle, Comm'l Car Journal, The Motor Truck, Power wagon, etc)  usually published  annual specs lists which might list some Barker models...or might mot, as, as memtioned above, many of the se "assembled" trucks were quite local and not interested in National listings...and I find no Barker truck listings in my old parts catalogs covering their period...

Sometimes I think Reference authors/publishers make special efforts to be a little differnt just to spur sales

 

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