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How bad is the collector market getting


Joe in Canada
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The advantage of the industrialized north is that nothing is very far away. In the souf (east and west) a hundred miles is around the block. The three places I go most often (Sarasota, Boynton Beach, and Jacksonville) are all over 120 miles from my home. The over 500 mile range in my Jeep (624 theoretical) is needful to avoid expensive gas on either coast.

 

ps when the sun is out, can figure the energy to be about 110W/sq ft. How many watts are needed to recharge a Tesla ? And this assumes the ability to store the power since many work during the day.

 

My concern is not so much the power load as millions of cars suddenly plugging in at 6 pm. And turning the AC/heater on. One thing we will need is year round DST.

Edited by padgett (see edit history)
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6 hours ago, padgett said:

 

My concern is not so much the power load as millions of cars suddenly plugging in at 6 pm. And turning the AC/heater on. One thing we will need is year round DST.

 

When I looked into this, it turned out that this isn't how it works.  The Tesla charger is designed to be programmed so it draws power late night when electricity is in least demand, and therefore is the cheapest. It's a really cool technology.

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 I understand in California that every new house built has to have solar power. Getting every house in the nation on the grid would certainly help things. All through the spring, summer, and fall I'm on the plus side or I'm producing more than consuming so they are paying me.

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1 hour ago, 1935Packard said:

 

When I looked into this, it turned out that this isn't how it works.  The Tesla charger is designed to be programmed so it draws power late night when electricity is in least demand, and therefore is the cheapest. It's a really cool technology.

 

Hopefully one can override that feature on the off chance you need to charge it during the day, or early evening if you are  planning on leaving at midnight. When machines are allowed to override people bad things happen.

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22 minutes ago, vermontboy said:

 

Hopefully one can override that feature on the off chance you need to charge it during the day, or early evening if you are  planning on leaving at midnight. When machines are allowed to override people bad things happen.

 

Yes, sorry for the confusion; you can program it however you want.  You control the charging via remote control on your phone, and the app lets you set it to turn on or or off whenever you want. At least that's how I understand it; I don't own one, unfortunately.  Video on the app here: 

 

 

Edited by 1935Packard (see edit history)
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You have a coffee maker, you set (program) it so that everyday it has hot coffee ready for you at 7AM.  Does that mean if you want hot coffee at 2PM you can’t have it and you have to wait until 7AM the next day?  Of course not, you just set it to make it at the time you want.  An electric car can be programmed, or not, to charge when electric rates are at their lowest cost if that option is available where you live.  Just like the auto engine turn off when stuck in traffic on new gasoline cars, if you want it fine and if not you turn it off.

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Back in 2013 I installed a network connected programmable and alarmed thermostat in my garage. Later I added a 20 port Cisco network switch for other items. I can override the program from the diner with my phone and have the garage all warmed up when I get home from coffee.

 

Here is the base panel first installed. Shopping for streaming audio now. Always ready for useful technology.

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Bernie

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  • 3 months later...

Your Model 54 in 'great shape, unrestored' condition can be anywhere from $20K to maybe $60K. Most likely $35K-$45K.  

What makes a huge difference is actual mechanical and actual cosmetic condition.  

What one person describes as 'Great Condition' is another person's 'OK but needs paint and interior..  

 

AND the huge issue: actual engine condition:  I have inspected many engines, this requires dropping the oil pan, and removing each connecting rod cap. Then measuring the rod journal and ID of the reassembled rod bearing.  The old poured babbitt has at best a 30% chance of being 'ok'.  MOST connecting rod bearing babbitt has cracks. missing pieces..  AND the engine sounds and runs ok..  But won't survive an hour long drive at 50mph.  

 

GLong

 

 

WozneyRod.jpg

missingbabbitt.jpg

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From a decent volume sales experience, the market for all cars is just fine (most everything finds a buyer), though that said the price skyrocketed on a lot of stuff and  there is just too much "expensive' stuff in the marketplace (aka there are far too many 100K cars for the amount of buyer interested in 100K cars, thus some will become 75k cars and some extraordinary ones will become 125k cars).  

 

A Pierce Arrow Brougham is a wonderful car and the really solid ones from new will stay well prices, though there is also a cosmetic factor and wooden wheels matched to certain rear-mounted verses sidemounted spares, and ... are all factors in play. 

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3 hours ago, eltonrouse@gmail.com said:

I'm getting older and have been advised by another car guy to liquidate some of my older cars.  Especially the 32 model 54 Brougham.  Anyone have an idea of value of an unrestored but in great shape vehicle like this?

IMG_1445.JPG

 

Private message sent.

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3 minutes ago, 1937hd45 said:

Just an observation, I'm not a player, the above mentioned cars are all selling for less than good Fords of the same era, do the tow groups know what the other is doing? 

You're right, of course. Your observation illustrates the oldest rule of placing a value on anything... "Supply and Demand." There is a rabid following of the very early V8 Fords...especially the 1932 model year. And since these cars have long been the very-most popular cars for hot rodders too, the demand always exceeds supply. 

 

The same is not true for many other low-to-medium priced cars of that era, however. 

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Yes, a lot of times one hears "Ford money" for brand xxx..  couple thoughts;

 

Early V8 market is good, but not red hot any more, definately same with As.  Open cars and coupes I think benefit from the fact if restorers pass, the rodder will probably buy it.

 

Non Classics with some exceptions, Buick, jr. Packard are cooling BUT represent great prewar buys, mopar especially.

 

Lower end Full Classics, the range of cars one may consider a bargain is growing.  That PA around $40k, in an interesting body style, and certainly the Auburn AJ mentions as a comp, seem like attractive deals to me anyway.

 

Interesting times..

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With a sound engine, the '32 Model 54 'Club Brougham' car is a very handsome car, and a great performer.  

The '32 Pierce has a Ross steering gear box, providing wonderful light steering forces, and longevity.  

The transmission has synromesh on 2nd and 3rd gears.   There also is freewheeling if you like that feature.

The Club Brougham as well as coupes, Convertible Coupe-Roadsters had factory 'high speed' gearing: 4.08:1 ratio, the heavier cars had 4.42:1

With great styling, wonderful driving characteristics and with fresh babbitt and a good valve job , these are great touring cars.  

 

GLong

 

 

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17 hours ago, lump said:

You're right, of course. Your observation illustrates the oldest rule of placing a value on anything... "Supply and Demand." There is a rabid following of the very early V8 Fords...especially the 1932 model year. And since these cars have long been the very-most popular cars for hot rodders too, the demand always exceeds supply. 

 

The same is not true for many other low-to-medium priced cars of that era, however. 

A certain joy to a Ford - parts availability and nice driveability without being overly heavy, complicated, or ...

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