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FLYER15015

How to put your baby to sleep ?

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This is probably a question for those of us north of the Mason Dixon line, but all can chime in.

How do you put your baby to sleep for the winter ?

 

For me, the '40 Buick LTD goes in the back of our unheated garage, up on jack stands and with a car cover.

The poor '31 Chrysler Imperial is consigned to sleep in the car hauler trailer, up on blocks.

Checked all fluids and made sure both are full of 50/50 antifreeze and batteries are charged and then disconnected.

Up here at 8500 ft., we can get 8 - 10 inches of snow @ any time, and night time temps can hit -20 F in December and January, though it warms up considerably during the day.

We don't have block heaters in either, and heating the barn or trailer scares me.

 

Any other ideas ? Or, how do you bed them down for the winter months ?

 

Mike in snowy Colorado

 

PS ; Forgot to say that I also add "Stabil" to full tanks of gas.

Edited by FLYER15015
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No sleeping around here. As long as there's no snow, rain, salt or slop I drive all 7 of my old cars year-round if the weather permits. 

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38 minutes ago, FLYER15015 said:

Up here at 8500 ft., we can get 8 - 10 inches of snow @ any time, and night time temps can hit -20 F in December and January, though it warms up considerably during the day.

 

Northern Pennsylvania has a climate similar to what you describe,

though a -20 degree low occurs maybe once every 5 years.

A typical winter high is 29, and snow is frequent, so snow stays around.

I have done much the same as you, there or elsewhere in Penna.

 

If I can take a car out on a nice winter day, when the roads are clear

and there isn't salt residue, I do so, but for 5 months they are

pretty much inactive.  The cars seem to do fine under this regimen.

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I put 6 collector cars, 1 motorcycle and our motorhome in my Barn/Shop and set the vented Reznor gas (Propane) furnace on 40 degrees.  Then when I go

down there to play I bump it up to 55 degrees, which is a great working temp.  No winterization required.  Then again we rarely get below zero here in the

Smoky Mountains.  Before the furnace I had to winterize everything in there.  One year we had two weeks below freezing, hence the furnace and blown in

insulation.  I sleep better now.

 

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In southern Ontario, Canada we seem to get a week in late January where the temp hits -20 C with overnights into the area of -25 C which translates into crunchy snow cold!  I try to keep the inside of the shop just above the freezing mark with a couple of fans running at floor level to keep the air moving.  I also fill the fuel tank and add fuel stabilizer and run the car long enough to get the stabilizer through the whole system.   I'm sure that there's another debate on the use of the stabilizer but after a couple of return visits to my small engine guy he told me he puts it in everything that he doesn't use at least once a month and I should do the same, or I can keep taking my chainsaw and wood chipper back to him every year and his wallet will be happy.  I haven't seen him in about 3 years now.   

 

I should add don't forget to winterize the shop - I have a flat roof and forgot to clear the roof drains in the fall after the leave had all fallen.  I was extremely lucky to only have a leaking roof in the spring after a particularly heavy rain and melt.  Once I manage to get up to the roof which is about 20 X 30 feet there was nearly 18 inches of standing water!

Edited by 3macboys
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For years my cars ( 2 car cement block garage my father and grandfather who were brick masons built in 1953) sat in there from about mid/end of December until perhaps the end of March. Depends upon if it is dry outside and the roads have no trace of salt. I live on western long island. About 3 years ago I wanted the garage "better" so put up studs on the inside walls, then 3/8 sheet rock - did the ceiling too, and had insulation blown in, followed by a heater ( electric) hung from the ceiling at the center in the rear. Electricity isn't cheap! but the $ I don't spend on booze, gambling ( have a major horse race track as my neighbor on two sides) , expensive vacations, gourmet meals etc go to electric bills over the winter.  This may be boring for some people but hey , when it is freezing outside and there is ice on the ground, or it is damp in the Spring , I can still go out in the garage and sit contently behind the wheel of my 30 Packard and 40 Buick pat them on the steering wheel or dashboard and smile and be happy like a little kid at Christmas.

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Oil change, Filter of course, grease, Check fluids other wise and install battery tender after disconnecting battery. Bye-bye till Spring. 

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You do not need to do more. You are good to go.

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I check the antifreeze to make sure it's still protected for low temps. I have two cars in unheated storage units, and one in a heated home garage. For the cars in the storage units, I put Bounce dryer sheets in the interiors and trunks, as well as some rodent repellent, but I've never really seen much evidence of pests at this location. Some of the precautions I take are daily rather than seasonal: I have a battery disconnect sw. on all three old cars, and turn it off after every use, even though none of the cars have battery drain problems. Have dust covers (breathable) for each of the cars, and they go back on after each use (unless I'm in the middle of a project that will take a few days.) 

 

In winter, I keep the windows all rolled up to help deter rodents; a change from summer when I keep all the windows cracked an inch or so to help reduce the risk of mold. As I said, not a lot of rodents around here, but I remember when I kept cars at rodent inhabited spaces, so I still take precautions. One other thing I don't do in the winter is start the car when the temp is in the '40's (f) or lower...for two reasons. First, if a car hasn't been started in a while, warmer oil will flow better. Second, if you start a car when it's really cold in a storage place that you don't frequent often, then once you leave, that big warm engine will be a very inviting environment for...you guessed it - RODENTS! 😄

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I like to run a box fan on the floor to keep the air moving, even in a space like a trailer (maybe especially in a small space like that). In the late fall early spring you're going to get days where it's very cold at night and warmer during the day, and the metal car is going to stay colder longer than the air. That creates A LOT of condensation. We even see it here in our shop, where we keep the showroom at about 55 degrees during the winter--it still feels damp when the days go into the 60s and into the 30s at night. A fan will help minimize the moisture settling on the car. Just a cheap box fan set on low and placed in the corner is sufficient. It's important to minimize moisture settling in and on the car, especially if it might freeze again.

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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Sta-bil in the gasoline, put all the convertible tops up, and move the cars down to the end of the garage where we do not open the doors much  - if you open and close the garage door for a daily driver in cold climates with lots of temperature changes the cars have a tendency to sweat. 

 

Also, do not keep salt in open containers in garage or any lawn chemicals, bags of ... or other things that are corrosive.

 

As a sidnote:  I am restoring an 1936 Auburn Phaeton that was closed up in a car trailer for 2 northern winters - when the owner opened the trailer he was horrified via car sweating  

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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Also, be sure to shut off the gas & run the engine until it runs out of gas in the float bowl to protect the carburetor from gummy gasoline varnish.

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Don't know if it worked, but 4 years ago I went to see a '26 Chrysler that had been restored 20 years earlier and then stored in an unheated enclosed 10x18 shed. The owner had placed 3 or 4 bales of straw in the shed to absorb any moisture. Seemed to do the trick, no signs of any condensation issue or smell of dampness.  

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6 hours ago, Mark Shaw said:

Also, be sure to shut off the gas & run the engine until it runs out of gas in the float bowl to protect the carburetor from gummy gasoline varnish.

A good idea to protect the carby, (for the folks down under), and I just ran out and did that.

Thanks Mark.

Did the Bounce sheets too James, but now I won't have that "grandma's house smell" come spring.

Guess you can't have everything.

 

Mike in snowy Colorado

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Our regional newspaper on Long Island, Newsday runs an antique automobile related column every Friday. A couple of weeks ago the article was devoted to winter storage. It told about "fogging" the engine. Apparently it is a system of coating the entire inside of the engine with oil. The only issue I have with that is that if you have a nice 50 degree day in January and decide to take out your car you can't. I have never done this and wonder how many people do it? I would guess it is mainly for very northern climates, that once you put the car away, you don't start it up again until April.

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CT has crap weather from mid Dec. If lucky through March, but their is usually a stretch where you can get the cars out for a little air.  When I do this its for at least an hour to warm evrything up.  For that reason I try to avoid "dead storage" if possible.

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On 10/28/2019 at 6:00 PM, FLYER15015 said:

This is probably a question for those of us north of the Mason Dixon line, but all can chime in.

How do you put your baby to sleep for the winter ?

 

For me, the '40 Buick LTD goes in the back of our unheated garage, up on jack stands and with a car cover.

The poor '31 Chrysler Imperial is consigned to sleep in the car hauler trailer, up on blocks.

Checked all fluids and made sure both are full of 50/50 antifreeze and batteries are charged and then disconnected.

Up here at 8500 ft., we can get 8 - 10 inches of snow @ any time, and night time temps can hit -20 F in December and January, though it warms up considerably during the day.

We don't have block heaters in either, and heating the barn or trailer scares me.

 

Any other ideas ? Or, how do you bed them down for the winter months ?

 

Mike in snowy Colorado

 

PS ; Forgot to say that I also add "Stabil" to full tanks of gas.

 

 

You have it covered quite well.  I have a service receipt for my 54 Special. The original owner lived in VT. The local dealer where she purchased the Buick would drain the antifreeze and pull the battery for the VT winter months. 

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Flyer brings up a point. He states that he puts his car on jack stands for the winter. I have heard several so called "experts" say not to put the car on jack stands and others say we should. What's the real story should we or not?

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I will add, for those who own cars with belt-driven superchargers, Remove the drive belt over winter, and then manually rotate the supercharger a couple of revolutions 2-3 times a month while its in storage.  This will keep the bearings or drive balls inside from flat-spotting and the fluid from going gummy.

 

Craig

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Northern Michigan winters arrive usually by November and stays till the end of March, for winter I put my truck on stands in October then I can run it at least once a month thru the gears to keep the oils flowing, I have an exhaust hose I run out  the garage door, it's kept in a climate control Log garage, I run a programable dehumidifier that controls the humidity until the temps get to 45 degrees for a high, that's what my furnace thermostat is set at 45 degrees unless I'm doing things in the garage then I turn the heat up, I use NON ETHONAL fuel and I keep a battery tender on the battery all year long.....So far so Good...:)

 

Steve M

Edited by Rooney3100 (see edit history)

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Mike,

 

Lots of good advise here. In Cincinnati where I live, we do not have a lot of snow so I can get the most of the cars out for a drive even in January or February most years as long as there is no salt on the roads. Sometimes I resort to just starting them up.  Two of my cars are on four post lifts that say not to use if below 40 degrees. I also check the antifreeze on all and run the gas out of the carbs of my brass cars. My barn has about 8 mouse traps always set and most years they stay away check them all year round. In the summer insects eat the peanut butter so have to replace. While I always put Stabil in our boat, I rarely put in the cars since I try to drive a tank of gas through each of them every year and have had little or no issues with ethanol gas. 

 

As a side note, I have been through Buena Vista every year for the past three and many times before over the years as my parents took me on summer vacations in Colorado to explore Ghost Towns and were the first out of state members of the Colorado Ghost Town Club. One of the best at least back in the 1960's was St. Elmo which is near you. Haven't had time to detour off 285 for some time but think it has been maintained. In 2017 we stopped for lunch at your micro brewery on the way to Leadville with my son-in-law's parents from Australia. Last year we buzzed through in our new motorhome and early last month we drove through on a crazy weekend trip to Ouray which is my favorite place. 

 

Tom Muth

Cincinnati, Oh 

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19 hours ago, 46 woodie said:

It told about "fogging" the engine. Apparently it is a system of coating the entire inside of the engine with oil.

 

You can buy fogging oil at a marine supply, I fogged every boat I winterized.

It only takes about three minutes depending how hard it is to pull the air filter. (flame arrestors on boats)

An alternative may be trans fluid or just about any other oil.
However the real fogging oil tends to flow out and coat quite well.

Comes in gallons or squirt cans.

The trick is to time yourself so that the carb runs empty at the same time the smoke is coming out. (I would usually end up draining the carburetor even though the fuel was already treated).

Changing all lubes is part of winterizing a boat.

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6 hours ago, 46 woodie said:

Flyer brings up a point. He states that he puts his car on jack stands for the winter. I have heard several so called "experts" say not to put the car on jack stands and others say we should. What's the real story should we or not?

 

Up on jackstands helps prevent flat spots in the tire tread area that's touching the ground. 

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