Sharps45-70

Best Late 20's / Early 30's Car for Touring?

Recommended Posts

On 10/31/2019 at 8:05 AM, edinmass said:


I don’t want to dump on anyone’s favorite brand of auto, and I mentioned Cadillac because I have owned a dozen of them and serviced a countless number. The problem isn’t the car, it’s the expectation of the owner.........recently a friend had a early Caddy that wouldn’t run correctly. I helped him out on the phone, email, and even had him send me a few things to sort out by ups. He assembled the car and I stopped by to check on it when I was in the area.(3000 miles away) He had never really driven the car over many years except around the block. We played with it a bit, and I drove it a few miles. The car was fine......the issue was a lack of knowledge of what a 1920’s Cadillac was capable of...........45 mph stock is the top end sweet spot without pushing it...........the same weekend he drove it 100 miles round trip to a show......and had a good time. It’s unrealistic expectations that often are the issue. 
 

Now.....one last final comment. MOST of the time price reflects overall drivability and difficulty maintaining a car. Many “BIG” cars are a handful by today’s standards. The guy who bought a car in 1930 expected to service it on a VERY REGULAR BASIS not once every five years. YES......old cars take time, upkeep, money, and effort. Pay attention to you pre war car like it should be, and you will never be disappointed. If you hand me your 100 point car, it’s a good bet that I can spend a minimum of forty hours dialing it in.......maybe as many as 100 hours, depending on the platform. As one restorer recently said to me, it’s nothing spending 40 hours getting a car to stop straight and have the breaks adjusted correctly. He was correct. When new, it was usually only a few hours, 90 years later with wear, different materials, and correcting everything in the entire system, it takes time. Whenever someone asks me how long any particular job will take servicing a car, the answer is always given in days, or weeks. Nothing ever goes as planned. You CAN’T fix a pre war car on a clock schedule........or a budget. You commit to fixing it correctly or not. The time, money, and effort are what they are. There are no short cuts. Just poor workmanship and disappointing results if you do it quick and cheap. Craftsmanship is a quickly disappearing talent, and the knowledge curve and countless hours spent learning skills on most pre war cars has mostly evaporated. The few left still doing it are mostly timing out and retiring. 

 

The amount of time it takes to sort an otherwise perfect looking car is staggering.   Going from 100 point trailer queen to caravan star is probably the same amount of work as going the other way.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Funny how things change over time. Back in my very early twenty’s I bought a cheap used truck and trailer.......not to take my car on tour or to transport it to shows.........I bought it so when I broke down my neighbor could come pick me up and take me home.......soon after the truck and trailer arrived, I purchased one of the very first available commercial cell phones........now I could call for the truck and trailer without knocking on a door to use a phone! Thought I had won the lottery with this set up. Then an old time collector said to me.......why don’t you just fix and sort your car correctly, and then you won’t need a tool kit or truck and trailer. Honestly I thought he was crazy......I didn’t think it could be done. Well, after years of looking, learning,  and being taught one of life’s most important lessons, I have never needed the trailer, cell phone, or a tool kit for hobby enjoyment again. Now I drive my cars thousands of miles every year. I don’t carry tools unless I’m a very long way from home.........and although I still carry them, they are almost never used. 
 

The lesson I learned? Fix it right, the FIRST TIME! Regardless of cost, time, and effort. Do It RIGHT, to the BEST of your ability. I was taught to approach the repair like a PROFESSIONAL MECHANICAL ENGINEER. And the same gentleman who taught me this lesson, also taught me the most important lesson in life I was ever given..............And I am forever in his debt he also taught me.....NEVER EVER GIVE UP on a problem......with a car or any other challenge in your life.............NEVER EVER!  I has served me well..........and while I still struggle every day with all sorts of challenges both automotive and in life in general........I never give up, it’s always time to improve you skills, your education, and continue every day for self improvement and try to become a better person. After all these years, I still am learning more and more every day..........and as the special lady in my life reminds me often.........I have a long way to go in the self improvement category!

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/4/2019 at 4:45 AM, edinmass said:

The lesson I learned? Fix it right, the FIRST TIME! Regardless of cost, time, and effort. Do It RIGHT, to the BEST of your ability. I was taught to approach the repair like a PROFESSIONAL MECHANICAL ENGINEER. And the same gentleman who taught me this lesson, also taught me the most important lesson in life I was ever given..............And I am forever in his debt he also taught me.....NEVER EVER GIVE UP on a problem......with a car or any other challenge in your life.............NEVER EVER!  I has served me well..........and while I still struggle every day with all sorts of challenges both automotive and in life in general........I never give up, it’s always time to improve you skills, your education, and continue every day for self improvement and try to become a better person. After all these years, I still am learning more and more every day..........and as the special lady in my life reminds me often.........I have a long way to go in the self improvement category!

The persistence thing goes a long way with pretty much anything !  And, a worthy challenge really is exciting.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I carry a tool kit in every car. Murphy says "anything you have, you will not need."

 

ps before retirement I resembled that remark.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I carry tool boxes in my 3 cars too and a spare fuel pump in one as well.

Just some common tools that should take care of anything reasonably repairable outside of a shop.

I've had need only once but without them I'd have been screwed....... 🤬

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting question. Keeping a late 1920´s car in good shape, rigorous maintenance and perfect operational condition will make it a great touring car, as it was already stated before. I usually drive my antique cars here in Brazil and, among all my cars, the 1929 Dodge-Brothers, brougham, is the one I consider most perfect for today´s roads and traffic! Very reliable, comfortable and easy to drive. Good speeds on the roads, and safe hydraulic brakes! Easy to park is also a good feature of this car, it is not so big and once it is a closed car, I can lock the doors and go for a walk without concerns.

Julio Albernaz

1926 Studebaker Big Six, sport roadster

1928 Chevrolet National, touring

1929 Dodge-Brothers Six, brougham

1929 Husdon Super Six, sedan

1929 Chrysler 75, roadster

1929 Marmon 78, touring speedster

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/20/2019 at 9:20 AM, JRA said:

Interesting question. Keeping a late 1920´s car in good shape, rigorous maintenance and perfect operational condition will make it a great touring car, as it was already stated before. I usually drive my antique cars here in Brazil and, among all my cars, the 1929 Dodge-Brothers, brougham, is the one I consider most perfect for today´s roads and traffic! Very reliable, comfortable and easy to drive. Good speeds on the roads, and safe hydraulic brakes! Easy to park is also a good feature of this car, it is not so big and once it is a closed car, I can lock the doors and go for a walk without concerns.

Julio Albernaz

1926 Studebaker Big Six, sport roadster

1928 Chevrolet National, touring

1929 Dodge-Brothers Six, brougham

1929 Husdon Super Six, sedan

1929 Chrysler 75, roadster

1929 Marmon 78, touring speedster

I find this point really interesting! Out of the cars you have listed in your response, I would have assumed you to pick the Chrysler 75, then probably the Marmon or Hudson in terms of overall drive-ability. Would you be able to comment on the others in relation to your Dodge? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A closed and smaller car has advantages over the heavier ones, specially the open car. My DB is very versatile. Convertibles are good and very charming for short rides in sunny days, in my view.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You guys are peeing all over Walt's thread.   I'll start a new one on how to sort and maintain a car.

 

 

Edited by alsancle
Added a link. (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now