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Do you tighten the lug nuts on a tire rotation.


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How is tightening the lugs NOT part of a tire rotation?

So you move the tire's location and you just say, 'Oh well' to the lug nuts that actually hold the wheels onto the car?

I guess the same court would rule that a tune up would not include tightening the new spark plugs.

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People are saying that all kinds of consumer protection are being eroded these days. People also say this seems like a little reminder it can happen to anyone at any time. Any time. To anyone. Anyone can have something like this happen to them. You too. Any time. And anyone else. Anyone. Including you. People are saying.....................................  

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Watch the way they tighten lug nuts on a NASA car car pit stop.  That is not the way I was tough.  I have always been told to cross tighten.

(This is off subject but I can not get an expiation.  How do I get the thumbs up to come back on the lower right corner of my postings?)

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11 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

By that logic, why even bother putting the lug nuts back on? Just takes too much time and isn't really part of the job anyway.

 

Earlier this year I had both driver side dually wheels come off the rear of my F350.

 

It happened at a relatively low speed on a four lane divided road.

 

Turns out - every other lug nut was missing on both rear wheels.

 

I had a rear brake job done at an ASE shop that charged me $400 just for the labor - they left the lug nuts off.

 

A few weeks later - I lost the rear differential just north of Barstow, California.

 

It just blew apart ....

 

Turns out - the impact of the left rear axle dropping onto the road had cracked the pinon.

 

 

Lawsuits only provide compensation for mistakes made at a later date down the road.

 

Out of necessity - as an acceptance of the reality that incompetence exists in the auto repair business - I have always

done just about all of my own maintenance and repair work on my trucks & trailers.

 

 

Jim

 

 

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From attorney viewpoint:  First, when things turn out illogical sometimes it is not what you are pleading, but how you plead it (and visa versa).   And, to some degree that is what Appeals Courts are for.  My opinion is that this case is possible more complicated than you think and it really would require some time spent reading and researching to see where the boat was missed.  And, the MVSRA may be unclear as to this and possibly not the right approach to correct it.   Some people dedicate their entire lives to cleaning up ambiguity - more challenging than you may think. 

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Agree, are very few mechanics I trust and none do it for a living. I do almost all of my own work but am waaay too slow to make it professionally. OTOH at one time in my life was responsible for digital flight and engine controls for aircraft. That made me very, very carful

 

Part of the issue is that modern society encourages stupidity.

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7 hours ago, Trulyvintage said:

 

Earlier this year I had both driver side dually wheels come off the rear of my F350.

 

It happened at a relatively low speed on a four lane divided road.

 

Turns out - every other lug nut was missing on both rear wheels.

 

I had a rear brake job done at an ASE shop that charged me $400 just for the labor - they left the lug nuts off.

 

A few weeks later - I lost the rear differential just north of Barstow, California.

 

It just blew apart ....

 

Turns out - the impact of the left rear axle dropping onto the road had cracked the pinon.

 

 

Lawsuits only provide compensation for mistakes made at a later date down the road.

 

Out of necessity - as an acceptance of the reality that incompetence exists in the auto repair business - I have always

done just about all of my own maintenance and repair work on my trucks & trailers.

 

 

Jim

 

 

My father owned a trucking business and taught me to thump all the tires at every stop and inspect the wheels/tires. I definitely did this when I was hauling cars from Texas. 

 

I am sorry that happened but glad it didn’t turn into a big accident and you or no one else apparently was hurt. 

Edited by victorialynn2 (see edit history)
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On the mechanic's side, it is distracting to work when the service manager and service writer are breathing down your neck demanding you find added work beyond the initial service request so they make their bonus. The mechanic was probably pushing a critically needed engine oil flush and forgot the lug nuts. He knew what the boss said was important.

 

Lawyers are funny with numbers. The fees are one digit followed by a string of zeros. And their phone numbers are one digit repeated 7 times.

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When I get tires changed or snow tires installed, even at Walmart, bringing the vehicle back a week later so they can check the lug nuts for tightness is standard. They remind you to bring it back, and it is written on the bill. I believe they started this when aluminum wheels became popular, we never had a problem with steel wheels.

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I have seen tire shops where one employee grabs a torque wrench hanging from a spot marked '1' or 'A' and goes around and tightens all the lug nuts.

He then places the torque wrench in a spot marked '2' or 'B'.

Second employee takes the torque wrench and tightens all of the lug nuts.

He places the torque wrench in a place marked '3' or 'C'.

That way they know that the lug nuts have been checked at least twice before it goes out the door.

 

Next car comes in and the wrench is moved back to the first position as they prep the area for next car.

 

You only need to have one wheel come off for management to determine they never want to go through those legal issues again.

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Well maybe that does exist.

 

I have always bought clickers (or beams) instead of more exotic torque wrenches, not because I am crazy about them, but because they could be used in both directions. The clickers generally have a reversing lever on top just like a regular ratchet.

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2 hours ago, 1912Staver said:

What is the state of the world when such a question even needs asking ? Let alone in a court case. Has the world gone mad ? Has any sort of reason been replaced by an opportunistic legal system ?

 

Greg in Canada

Question 1, SNAFU

Question 2, No

Question 3, Yes

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I remember the #1 land use attorney in the State saying there is really not much you can do. The developer has the right to annex his land into the City. This was six years ago. Turns out there was something that you could do. I remember a successful business man saying it will take a machine to drive that through. That machine failed.( still going to happen) Was never about annexation. It was about the largest hose job this valley would have ever seen. I remember a retired Navy Vet saying all you can do is go to work, at this point he was right with that comment, nobody will do anything out here. I remember a sheriff walking out of a hospital room, and a nurse saying there is a lot going on. So you see, lawyers, salesmen, politicians, police, car guys and every other trade/occupation all can have one thing in common, free will. (also said by that Navy guy) Funny thing,  free will. Maybe that is why the lug nuts were not tight. Kool aid is Kool aid, no matter who pours it.

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