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How many is too many carburetors?


lump
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Years ago my brother-in-law "Lee" and I used to love scrounging through junkyards with older cars, looking for "treasures." (late 1970's & early 80's) Then I became self-employed and couldn't find time, yet Lee kept at it. He stockpiled parts in his garage attic, and whenever I needed something, I knew where to look. 

 

Recently he and I were talking, and agreed that we STILL love to hunt for "treasures," but as senior citizens we need to clear out some of the excess, so we won't leave behind a mess for our wives when we go "over the rainbow." I suggested to Lee that carburetors would be a good place to start, since many carbs in his "collection" (from 1950's thru 1980's) have ID numbers and date codes, which make them "easier" to sell on eBay or Craigslist. Lee responded that he is not all that comfortable with online stuff, and gets frustrated listing stuff on eBay. He countered that if I would list and sell the carbs, he would split the proceeds with me. I said sure, seemed like a good idea, and shouldn't be too big of a job. 

 

Then yesterday Lee showed up at my office, and asked me to come outside and see what he had for me.... YIKES!! 

Carburetors Lees truckload 1.jpg

Carburetors Lees truckload 2.jpg

Edited by lump (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, 1937hd45 said:

If you know what they fit they may find a home, good luck. Walked past lots of that stuff at Hershey. Bob 

Only some of them will be reasonable to find. For me, the Chevy parts are the easiest. But others will be impossible, or nearly so. (Just ask Jon, the Carb King). The biggest challenge will be trying to research the numbers and date codes for every one of the OEM carbs, and figuring out which are over-the-counter replacements (good mostly just for parts), which are total junk, and which are those few gems. 

 

The first carb I started trying to ID is actually one that got left behind at our swap meet a year or two ago. It is a Carter AFB, and has its brass tag intact, but has a 6-digit part number, which doesn't fit the system as far as I know. So that one may end up right back at the scrapper, waiting to be melted down for scrap aluminum. Hope they won't ALL prove to be that difficult. 😵

Edited by lump (see edit history)
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With all due respect, I would recommend you might refrain from sharing pictures like the ones in your initial post.

Showing a truckload of delicate metering devices, such as carburetors, piled or thrown on top of each other in haphazard manner may suggest lack of appropriate care or respect for them.

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1 hour ago, TTR said:

With all due respect, I would recommend you might refrain from sharing pictures like the ones in your initial post.

Showing a truckload of delicate metering devices, such as carburetors, piled or thrown on top of each other in haphazard manner may suggest lack of appropriate care or respect for them.

I received the parts from a truck & heavy equipment parts room cleanout. They were scooped up with a bucket loader and dumped in a dump truck, them dumped in my driveway. Had no problem in selling any of it. Bob 

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58 minutes ago, carbking said:

If you were close to central Missouri, I could keep you busy for awhile ;)

 

Let me know how many of the Rochester 4 barrel identification numbers end in 63, 67, 68, 70, 73, 75, 76,  77, 85, 86, 87, or 88 and what you want for them.

 

Jon.

Jon, 

You have always been a great source of info to me about carburetors, and I have been grateful. Plus I have great memories of being set up as a vendor right across from you at Hershey (you were beside Kanter Auto Products). Your dad shot a video of me in a huge rainstorm, making mud dams on my knees to try and divert the flowing water around my vendor booth, instead of right through it. (Remember that? Must have been in late 70's, or early 80's.)

 

I'll be happy to search for any carbs you may need. 

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1 hour ago, TTR said:

With all due respect, I would recommend you might refrain from sharing pictures like the ones in your initial post.

Showing a truckload of delicate metering devices, such as carburetors, piled or thrown on top of each other in haphazard manner may suggest lack of appropriate care or respect for them.

You make a good point, TTR. But the image of an entire truckload of old carburetors struck me as interesting and almost humorous, and I really wanted to share that with my fellow forum members. 

 

The fact is that these carb cores are already in whatever condition they were when found in the yard. I'll post several photos of each one on eBay, and point out any challenges like frozen shafts, cracked housings, or dented edges, etc. 

 

Over many years of digging out parts like these, I have found quite a few really nice units...and some junkers. But generally speaking even the junkers are worth something to someone as parts sources. I won't represent any of them as pristine units which have been carefully stored, and I wouldn't want to give anyone that kind of impression of them

 

But thanks for your observation, which I understand fully. 

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10 minutes ago, lump said:

Jon, 

You have always been a great source of info to me about carburetors, and I have been grateful. Plus I have great memories of being set up as a vendor right across from you at Hershey (you were beside Kanter Auto Products). Your dad shot a video of me in a huge rainstorm, making mud dams on my knees to try and divert the flowing water around my vendor booth, instead of right through it. (Remember that? Must have been in late 70's, or early 80's.)

 

I'll be happy to search for any carbs you may need. 

 

Rain??? At Hershey??? Surely you jest! ;) Part of the video shot later that weekend was a guy with a sense of humor pushing on the back of his buddies motorhome to get it out of the mud. But in front of the motorhome was a tractor pulling it! Bet he would not like to see the complete video.

 

I had forgotten that video. Dad passed about 7 years ago, and we finally have sold off enough of his "stuff" to have the last estate sale this coming week-end. Shoot me an email, and if I ever find that video (Dad shot thousands of them) will forward it to you.

 

Actually, the rain at Hershey HELPED our business. As you probably remember, we always rented a tent. During rain-storms, customers would take refuge inside our tent, and spent more time shopping!

 

And I am not looking for any carbs (with 150,000 I should buy more???), rather posted those numbers as a hint that all that glitters is not gold (as in common carburetors). The numbers I posted are high performance Pontiac and Ford, and you have a better probability of winning an argument with the IRS than having one. But if you did, they are worth MONEY!

 

Thank you for bringing back some memories that now are great, maybe less so when we were making them.

 

Jon

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35 minutes ago, 1937hd45 said:

I received the parts from a truck & heavy equipment parts room cleanout. They were scooped up with a bucket loader and dumped in a dump truck, them dumped in my driveway. Had no problem in selling any of it. Bob 

Yes, I understand, this kind of "care", or lack there of, is more than common. A lot of of people don't seem care or have much respect for any old and/or used stuff, even if it's their own, be it automotive or anything else, but I've always had a tendency to approach or view at things little differently. 

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9 minutes ago, TTR said:

Yes, I understand, this kind of "care", or lack there of, is more than common. A lot of of people don't seem care or have much respect for any old and/or used stuff, even if it's their own, be it automotive or anything else, but I've always had a tendency to approach or view at things little differently. 

Think it was 20 years ago when eBay really started moving things I dug up parts I had buried in a low spot in the side yard. Accurately described most things will sell if priced right. 

 

Bob 

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Again here is what I do with brass carbs that will never find a proper home. They make great bookends like this Marvel  did. I bought 3 more at Hershey this year that will have the same fate.

2019-10-21 2019-10-21 001 002.JPG

Edited by Joe in Canada (see edit history)
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Noted that all I could see were four barrels. I like lotsa carbs. Most I've seen (other than Hilborns) was 8 97s on a SBC.

 

Some time ago (like the last century) I put together a guide to deciphering Rochesters of the 60s and 70s.

 

 

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Joe - I see stains on the wood under the carb; where the Marvel carb leaked! 😜

 

EDIT: Years ago I hit upon what I thought was a sure-fire way to prevent a Marvel from leaking. I acquired a 6x6x4 inch block of walnut, a piece of green felt that was 6x6 (for the bottom of the walnut), a piece of lamp rod, and a micro-switch from Radio Shack. Made a lamp. Attached the micro-switch inside the throttle so the lamp could be activated by moving the throttle lever.

 

The only problem was that when the lamp was on, lots of tiny electrons were dancing under the Marvel! ;) You don't have to hook it up to gas for it to leak!

 

Jon

Edited by carbking (see edit history)
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