Mark Gregory

Pistons needed Egge & Arias do not have them. Anyone have a lead ? ?

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I am trying to help out a fellow Reo owner who needs some pistons for his engine.

He has tried Egge and Arias with no luck.

 

Here is what he requires for

 

1915 REO Speed Wagon, Mkdel F,  4 cylinder, 1500 pound truck.

 

need 4 pistons and rings and wrist pins if available ( but mine are good )
4.125 + 0.040 bore
2.375 compression height 
4.750 long
pin bore 1.225
or something close.
Edited by Mark Gregory (see edit history)

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About a year ago my friend had a piston from a 1918 McLauchin  Buick reproduced  by Egge Machine but it was not cheap .

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We have had good luck sourcing otherwise unavailable pistons from Ross. They only do forged pistons so the cost will he high but better than no pistons at all.

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Any chance to have them knurled/expanded? Do shops do that anymore?

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Another vote for Ross. Yes they are more expensive than Egge, but quality is far better and the pistons are lighter and stronger. Last time I checked they were less expensive than Arias.  

 

Ross does a lot of custom work for race and aircraft, so that size shouldn't be a problem.

 

Paul

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)
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Light pistons reduce load on the rods and bearings. When having custom pistons made, the possibility of a modern ring package also exists (inquire). Modern ring packages can result in less wear on the bores and less oil consumption as well. I am not advocating doing this to every car. I wouldn't do it if the bores were still good and the pistons still fit, but if the pistons need replacing anyway, the only downside is cost. It isn't just throwing money. It is throwing money where it might actually do some good.

 

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
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As is true 99.99% of the time, Bloo is dead spot on. You can always justify a bit of extra expense when you are really making a meaningful improvement. When I last spoke to Arias, maybe a year and a half ago, they were the production source for the "eggs" forged pistons. Go to Arias and Ross, why not Jahns also as long as you are up. Have a real good heart to heart regarding raising compression as much as is realistically feasible. (You do understand the totally unmitigated benefits of raising the compression of an ancient engine built to run on 40-50 octane gasoline ? What year did you say is the Reo ? Is it side valve or F head ?). You will have to be deeply in the loop on that one in the engineering department. They will certainly work WITH you, and have been improving flatheads by the thousands for many decades. Talk with the oldest of the old hotrodders still on the payrolls. Hand in hand, get a thorough understanding of the combustion chambers through sharing observation, by claying at top dead center, and cc'ing. That is a very fun, relatively straightforward, and rewarding process. Additionally, your good forum friends would love to be involved. Valve configuration, particularly if other than a side valve with a direct shunt between intake and exhaust, opens up more productive possibilities. Please keep us in the loop.                 Just another of your good (?) I had a girlfriend who lived in Carlsbad - she said I was - California, but certainly old, forum friends,      -     Cadillac Carl !          Good luck, Mark. You do so much looking out for others here. Thank you. 

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Mark,

 

Is this for a Royale?   I spent 1k with Ross to have  8 made 3 years ago.   I would suggest doing all 8 and not just 4.

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I had Arias make six pistons for a six cylinder Dodge 413 engine. Beautiful 1-1/8" wrist pin forged pistons.

I tried for years to find new ones everywhere.

Arias was the only company willing and able.to supply the correct 1-1/8" wrist pin pistons. 

Costly @ $1200.00.

 

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A.J.

 

These are for a Reo owner who owns this Truck below.

 

1915 REO Speed Wagon, Mkdel F,  4 cylinder, 1500 pound truck.

 

My Royale engine was in good shape and ran on the first crank.

According to the Mechanic the engine had masculine purr to it.

Mark

 

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There are quite a few members of the PAS that wouldn't even think of using Egge pistons anymore.

My Rickenbacker has Egge pistons but they were originally made for that engine back in the late 70's.

Edited by zepher (see edit history)

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That 1.224 pin confuses things...

My 36 King Prod  manual shows two pistons about your size, used in both the cars and trucks...

One for 1918-20 F18, J18, K18, T4, T18, U4 and U18 cars, and same  year F, J, F Speedwagom 3/4-2T truck 

Specs 41/8 diam, 23/8 Comp dist, 451/64 length  (4.75=48/64 pin diam 1.224......

The other is for 1913-18 R, S, R5, S5 cars and came year F, J, F Speedwagom 3/4-2T trucks...those  specs go

41/8, 23/8, 451/64, but pin diam id 1.234  

If those two pistons are interchangeable, you might have the later pistons...or the manual might be off...

Now, under  Reo truck there's also the 31-32 6  cyl 4J, 4K, 4T, 4Ton trucks using a Buda K381 engine, whose piston specs are 41/8,  21/4 and 43/8=428/64...

Unfortunately, the K381 doesn't seem to've been that popular...

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Gentlemen.........when it comes to pistons, there are and have been problems very recently with SEVERAL. companies that have been listed here, some have had lots of issues over the years, and recently a company with a good reputation has most definitely having issues. I would recommend doing your homework and reaching out to others before you install any pistons. I can tell you I have installed pistons from every company mentioned above..........and would NOT use most of them. One company I use to use exclusively has gone down hill............lots of changes in the car world when it comes to new reproduction parts, you can never be too careful. Ed

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On 10/21/2019 at 12:01 PM, keiser31 said:

Have you tried Jahns pistons?

No, first time hearing of this brand. Will look into it thanks.

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11 hours ago, Bud Tierney said:

That 1.224 pin confuses things...

My 36 King Prod  manual shows two pistons about your size, used in both the cars and trucks...

One for 1918-20 F18, J18, K18, T4, T18, U4 and U18 cars, and same  year F, J, F Speedwagom 3/4-2T truck 

Specs 41/8 diam, 23/8 Comp dist, 451/64 length  (4.75=48/64 pin diam 1.224......

The other is for 1913-18 R, S, R5, S5 cars and came year F, J, F Speedwagom 3/4-2T trucks...those  specs go

41/8, 23/8, 451/64, but pin diam id 1.234  

If those two pistons are interchangeable, you might have the later pistons...or the manual might be off...

Now, under  Reo truck there's also the 31-32 6  cyl 4J, 4K, 4T, 4Ton trucks using a Buda K381 engine, whose piston specs are 41/8,  21/4 and 43/8=428/64...

Unfortunately, the K381 doesn't seem to've been that popular...

Pin is 1.224 (1.225). If I have pistons made we will double check the rod but likely will ask for 1.224" pins. Thanks for the info. 

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Jahns made a very low cost cast piston and quality forged pistons that were on the heavy side but what they made for years were forged piston blanks. With a piston blank, a lathe and a mill you can make one to any spec. Unless you can cam grind the piston it will be round which is a bit noisier but no problem. Gets better when warmed up. Back in the 60's we were doing offset crank pin grinding, experimenting with rod length,  ring position, and dome design among other tricks to beat the competition so went through a lot of pistons (and other parts). Won some/lost some but gained even from the flops.

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Another nod to Ross. They made the pistons for m6 32’ Olds. Extremely good job. You can see them in the restoration thread of my 32’ Olds roadster.  A company specializing in pistons for high compression, high revving, engines and been in business a long time probably has a good product. Their old engine line of pistons are made the same way.

Edited by chistech (see edit history)

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Several years ago we needed pistons for a '49 Olds Rocket 88. We contacted Egge and they told us they had had a fire and their foundry pattern for the particular size piston we needed had burned up in the fire. No problem. We called another of the nationally known piston "manufacturers" and coincidentally they had also had a fire that destroyed their pattern for our pistons. A third call was made to another national piston supplier and lo and behold they also had a fire and lost their pattern. Finally we contracted with Ross to make us a set of forged piston. Nice people to deal with, still a family business. Moral of the story is do not confuse piston resellers with piston manufacturers. To be fair, we have used many pistons and other parts sourced thru Egge and have had only one problem, a set of Packard pistons that came with several cracked wrist pins.

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have a lead for a parts guy in Mid west     good source for motor parts     bought out stock from   JANS PISTONS    E mail me    bobnroman@yahoo.com

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On 10/21/2019 at 1:23 PM, Lahti35 said:

Any chance to have them knurled/expanded? Do shops do that anymore?

That can fix piston slap, but not a modern practice. I would only consider knurnlig as a last resort.

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On 10/23/2019 at 7:57 AM, Restorer32 said:

Several years ago we needed pistons for a '49 Olds Rocket 88. We contacted Egge and they told us they had had a fire and their foundry pattern for the particular size piston we needed had burned up in the fire. No problem. We called another of the nationally known piston "manufacturers" and coincidentally they had also had a fire that destroyed their pattern for our pistons. A third call was made to another national piston supplier and lo and behold they also had a fire and lost their pattern. Finally we contracted with Ross to make us a set of forged piston. Nice people to deal with, still a family business. Moral of the story is do not confuse piston resellers with piston manufacturers. To be fair, we have used many pistons and other parts sourced thru Egge and have had only one problem, a set of Packard pistons that came with several cracked wrist pins.

I had a gentleman who told me he had a packard engine redone with Egge pistons and after just a short time the engine failed due to piston failure. Believe he’s from PA or NY. Curious if this is the same car?

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No, we have done several Packards using Egge pistons and all are still running well as far as I know. Out of an excess of caution we are not using Egge pistons in a '42 Packard engine we are doing now.

 

 

 

 

 

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