Kfigel

Identify Antique Studebaker Parts

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These parts/stands came with my 1922 Studebaker and I don't know what they're for.  They look like stands of some type.  There are four of them; two with leather binding on the top, two without.  It's a touring car, so would they be used to hold the top in the down position?  They fold flat.  Any help is much appreciated. IMG_2696.thumb.JPG.0d40f142fbe6900524a06db2217bda03.JPGIMG_2697.thumb.JPG.259ee8ce08c2b94254792e834b56f321.JPG

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They are wheel hub jack stands......for very early cars. Best guess is pre 1920. They are NOT heavy duty, and I would not use them to service the car. Neat garage item or wall hanger........value, less than 100 for the pair. Good luck. Ed

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1 hour ago, edinmass said:

They are wheel hub jack stands......for very early cars. Best guess is pre 1920. They are NOT heavy duty, and I would not use them to service the car. Neat garage item or wall hanger........value, less than 100 for the pair. Good luck. Ed

Thanks!  Should have realized this as they are the correct height for the hubs from the floor.  So were they intended to support the car by the four hubs when the wheels were off the car?  You are right that they are not heavy duty - would never trust them to support a car.  Thanks again.

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Yes, usually used in sets of four, to stop tires getting flat spots. Most cars didn't use antifreeze, so they were put up for the winter......on hub jacks.

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Just now, edinmass said:

Yes, usually used in sets of four, to stop tires getting flat spots. Most cars didn't use antifreeze, so they were put up for the winter......on hub jacks.

Thanks so much. 

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Correct, not for working underneath, though work well to prevent flat spots.  I usually see them accompanying brass era car and carriages (solid rubber tire vehicles).

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