Sign in to follow this  
auburnseeker

Though Not original, I have to say this doesn't look too bad.

Recommended Posts

https://allentown.craigslist.org/cto/d/saylorsburg-1923-dodge-rat-rod/7001134896.html

 

Too bad there is primer on the cowl or you would swear it was built 70 years ago,  until you raised the hood. 

Not sure how good the underslung principal works for drivability but it was one easy way to lower it without hacking up the frame. 

Looks alot better than all the abominations i have seen on S10 frames. 

00505_foY4lGyMTU0_600x450.jpg

00W0W_jicRFaM305K_600x450.jpg

00W0W_lDbXEonq2l6_600x450.jpg

00i0i_j6r3YddmNxq_600x450.jpg

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, if you never opened the hood you could fool a lot of people. You could do a few things to disguise the motor and really have some fun, "This car was built by Barney Oldfield back in blah blah blah." Not my cup of tea, but pretty cool.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could be a "Chrysler Hemi Prototype" but bot sure about full elliptics all around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nearly everyone I know involved in working on model Ts are building speedsters, and a ton of non T builds are in process as well.  Mostly by guys under my age of five and a half decades.

Observations I have are:  this group builds, they aren't into muscle or street rods in the typical sense.  Something, maybe romance of a early motoring, etc. Motivates them.  These cars sometimes stray from strictly speedster but most probably don't consider them rat rods.  They found a relatively inexpensive way to enjoy the hobby, I think its great.  FWIW...  

 

Maybe artistic license a bit but cool none the less.  🙂

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good use of parts that would never be used in a restoration. I do question the price/value of them. Bob 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once this current craze passes (like $75k mid 70s Porsche 911s), hopefully some are kept for use now and then.  The sum exceeds the parts value for now Bob, but I agree not in the long haul.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Xander I think thar's Clayton Paddisons speedster, aka mr. Model T on a few forums.  I think he just hit age 40.  Designed as what a depression era farm boy might have put together.  Leno drove it and loved it. 🙂

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another view. Not sure on drive train, the rope is there to keep people like me away from the cars.:lol:

Forest Grove 170.JPG

  • Like 2
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like a twin H air cleaner, but that's probably just for clearance. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

I believe it a flat 4, A or T

He's got a T motor in it, mated to a Chicago auxiliary transmission... cool car.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Speedster guys look at this car the way hot rodders look at the D. Spencer 32.  Sometimes ya just nail it.  It will be an "important car" in a few years...

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not really a hot rod guy but I like them both.

I especially like that the 2nd pictured isn't 'over done'.

It has paint and body work that would have been what a backyard guy would have done to create their own speedster back in the day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My T is all T or period aftermarket.  Here is a brief rundown of the Drivetrain as built during the complete Pre-Bonneville refit in 2011:

 

Drivetrian:

   -1927 T Block, bored .080” over

   -Custom Egge Aluminum Pistons

   -Aluminum 6:1 compression “Z-Head”

   -289/302 Ford Hi-Po Hardened Stainless Valves/seats

   -Full Race T cam shaft

   -12v ignition system w/ Mallory Auto Advance Dizzy

   -1947-’49 Burns 2x2 Model A intake

   -Two Stromberg 81 carburetors

   -Cast Iron High-Flow Model A Header w/’46 Ford Torque Tube exhaust.

   - Chicago Mark-E 3-spd Overdrive Box (made in 1922 Bryan, Ohio)

   - Early Hall-Scott Ruckstell 2-speed Rear axle with 3:1 gears

   - Rocky-Mountain rear wheels brakes

 

Chassis:

  -Uncut 1926 T frame

  -Unaltered 1926 T front axle.

  -Model A wishbones split and modified to hold the front spring perches (all custom built)

  -Custom rear lowering brackets based on an old Robert Roof design (improved for strength)

  - 19”MWCo. Pin-drive Wire wheels

It has 12 forward speeds and 6 in reverse and id fully capable of speeds in excess of 75mph.

DSCN7521.thumb.JPG.ae08cbf448c27cc1a1a9cec8bb3083a0.JPG

 

Jay  Leno_ Clayton Paddison 1927_Ford_Model_T.jpg

On the Jersey Shore.JPG

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Steve Moskowitz said:

Wow, that front shot with the salt on the tires is killer!!  Thanks for sharing...

 

I think that may be my favorite shot from the whole trip...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the info and photos! The headlights & top are two features that really make this car stand out . Bob 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/17/2019 at 10:22 AM, padgett said:

Could be a "Chrysler Hemi Prototype" but bot sure about full elliptics all around.

 

Is that a Mitsubishi 4 from the 70s?  My Mother had a Dodge Colt with that motor in it.  Ran well, competitive in C Sedan as an autocrosser.  She didn't know that, but I did.  Only problem was the body dissolved in about 5 years.  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this