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1903 Cleveland Roadster project


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1 hour ago, alsfarms said:

Hello Harm,

I can appreciate what snow does to change the appearance of the countryside.  Nice pictures.  How much snow did your receive before Mother Nature blessed you with some wind to pile it up in drifts?

Regards,

Al

Hi Al,

No snow at all. Saturday morning the 6th the temperature was about 40F and it rained a bit. Late in the afternoon  it became windy and colder. At night the temperature dropped fast,  and "windy" became a storm and it started to snow. And it stayed till Tuesday morning. At this very moment its 18F outside...

Regards,

Harm

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Harm.......as far as oil channels go.......... does the car have a scupper? Often times when you buy a car and somebody has been in the engine the scuppers disappear. I have a friend rebuilding an early four-cylinder and he did it three times. On his fourth attempt I stopped by the shop just by luck, I asked him why he was doing it again and he said he kept locking up. I told him the engine originally had scuppers  on the connecting rod, and a windage tray......they were missing. He was able to get photos and make what he needed. I’ve never done a single cylinder horizontal engine. I have done an early twin horizontal. You can clearly see grooves on the exterior of the connecting rod to catch oil and let it into the bearing. Do you have the advantage of modern oils, but I think a little bit of research and some photos on anything even closely similar it’s going to be necessary. 

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Hi Harm, It is just a thought, it maybe worth having a look on a Douglas Motorcycle site for answers? The early models of these had the horizontal engine running North to South. There no doubt even more makes of motorcycle engines like this but Douglas was one of the most popular of the period. Nice to see your snowy photos, as you probably know, we had the same sort of weather as you in East Anglia. Best regards Mike

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10 hours ago, Mike Macartney said:

Hi Harm, It is just a thought, it maybe worth having a look on a Douglas Motorcycle site for answers? The early models of these had the horizontal engine running North to South. There no doubt even more makes of motorcycle engines like this but Douglas was one of the most popular of the period. Nice to see your snowy photos, as you probably know, we had the same sort of weather as you in East Anglia. Best regards Mike

Hello Mike,

Yes, I was aware that that you had the same weather, saw it on the weather radar pictures. After the weekend thaw will set in here, and temperatures will rise to 50F, but they also predicted a lot of rain. But first we will have some bitter cold nights.

 

Mike, thank you for the Douglas Motorcycle link. The way they assembled the con rods, and the con rod bearings at the crankshaft is very ingenious, really very clever. I guess these motor bikes were expensive in their time? The bearings for these engines are split roller bearings.  I had a very enjoyable afternoon and the best had yet to come.....

Reading a blog on the Douglas Motorcycle technical forum (Illustrated tour on the pre-war OHV Douglas Crankshaft), I saw some vaguely familiar pieces at the pictures. I thought they looked like some pieces of steel that came with my Cleveland. I never could identify them, let alone if they belonged to the Cleveland or not. So I stored them and forgot their existence till this afternoon. To my amazement, those pieces appeared to be crankshaft counterweights!  So I took the box with the unidentified pieces of the shelf, and tried to assemble the parts. You would not believe it, but those steel pieces and the U-straps fitted like a glove on the Cleveland crankshaft, even the nuts fit. Tomorrow I will take some pictures of the crankshaft assembly and publish them.

Mike, I am very grateful for your help, this was really unexpected 😀.

Best regards,

Harm

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21 hours ago, edinmass said:

Harm.......as far as oil channels go.......... does the car have a scupper? Often times when you buy a car and somebody has been in the engine the scuppers disappear. I have a friend rebuilding an early four-cylinder and he did it three times. On his fourth attempt I stopped by the shop just by luck, I asked him why he was doing it again and he said he kept locking up. I told him the engine originally had scuppers  on the connecting rod, and a windage tray......they were missing. He was able to get photos and make what he needed. I’ve never done a single cylinder horizontal engine. I have done an early twin horizontal. You can clearly see grooves on the exterior of the connecting rod to catch oil and let it into the bearing. Do you have the advantage of modern oils, but I think a little bit of research and some photos on anything even closely similar it’s going to be necessary. 

Hello Ed,

Thanks for your advise. No the engine does not have a scupper, looking at the con rod cap it did not have one originally. The only strange thing I can see, the con rod has a threaded hole (about 3/8") to the bearing like and oil hole, but why threaded? Did some oil catcher of some sort was screwed in that hole? Could that be some kind of scupper, mmm interesting. Time to find out how deep the con rod goes into the sump. Maybe I can design something acting like a scupper. I will take detail pictures tomorrow.

Regards,

Harm

Edited by Sloth (see edit history)
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This morning I took a picture of the hole in the con rod diameter about 5/16", it has a very fine thread in it. Did not figure out yet what kind of thread it is. As you can see, the connecting rod sides are machined, but left with a really very rough finish.

 

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Threaded hole in connecting rod. (Somehow I have the idea that the hole was later machined there.)

 

 

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Here are all the counterweights parts. Counterweights weighing 4.33 Lbs each.

 

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Assembled counterweights with the crankshaft.

 

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Side view of the assembled counterweights.

 

The U bolts seemed to have been repaired several times (at the thread-ends), so I will make new ones. The thread on the U bolts is 5/16 BSW, I consider that a bit odd, but all the threads on the Cleveland engine are BSW or BSF, the same applies for the gearbox. I was under the impression that at that time (1902/1903) standardization to UNF and UNC was already done.

Further as it is still bitter cold in- en outside the shop,  I came to nothing useful.

Regards,

Harm

 

 

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No...the push for standardization did not come until after WWI as a result of the logistical nightmare of repairing vehicles of different makes using different thread systems. Ed is having that problem with his 1917 White that has ALAM threads. The systems are all inter-related so occasionally the same thread count shows up in more than one, further confusing things. BSF and BSW were well known in the US in 1900 and may have been favored because the nuts, bolts, taps & dies were readily available – much more so than today.

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Hello Harm,

On the threaded hole in the picture above.   I have huge four cylinder Fairbanks compressor that has a very similar think on the connecting rods.  In this case, for some reason, oil scoops were not desired so what Fairbanks did was to drill and thread in each rod and simply had a round rod threaded and then threaded into the hole.  The purpose was to allow the crank to not splash into the oil, but the rod cut the oil, with the rod, and allowed the oil to lubricate the rod against the crank.  I can't tell, is the threaded hole referenced down so it would contact the oil reservoir, of the pan, if it had a short rod threaded into it?

Al

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Important parts.......I have seen this countless times.........basket case projects with “extra” or unknown parts missing. I have never seen crankshaft weights attach like that............all the more reason to look, and figure out what may or may not be missing. Without reference photos from an identical or similar car........no matter how good a skill set you have, problems can appear despite doing a complete and detailed job. With today’s modern oil, and the possibility of unknown missing or altered oiling system parts.......it’s why I suggested to keep the clearance on the sloppy side of the acceptable range. I don’t know any very early engine experts, but I think posting extra photos, and asking lots of questions of members here will be of great help. If I were building the engine, I would run it on a stand for twenty hours before pulling it apart again, checking everything, and then install it in the car. After fifty years I have learned the shortest way to a good outcome is taking the long road BEFORE trying to go for a test drive. Are there any other cars that have photos available from past restorations?  

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Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Well - going backwards from this discussion to the babbitt pour - I did attempt my first pour yesterday, and I will probably have to redo my first attempt.   I think I lost too much heat in the molten babbitt and my mold when I poured it.   I was not happy with the tinning process and I think I lost too much heat in the bronze bearing.   The instructions I read with the Tintite said to heat part to 650 - then wipe the molten Tintite off with a rag until shiny material is left - all the time not letting the part fall below 450.  That proved to be quite a task as I had to quickly attempt that then put the rest of my mold together.  When I was finally able to pour, the babbitt set up way too fast in the mold and created a few inclusions that will probably not be able to machine out.   

I did learn quite a bit for my first attempt.   I used dry graphite on my center tube and anywhere I did not want the babbitt to stick and I must say it worked perfectly.  I did not taper the tube -  but did not have to as it pressed out without any fight at all.   I also need to heat the babbitt material more efficiently as the little electric cast iron ladle I was using didnt seem be able to heat much above the 795 degree pour temp.  I was also fighting the dross forming on the top of the babbitt which took too much time also.   I think a bottom pour ladle is the way to go on my next attempt, which I hope to do next weekend.

Attached are two pictures of the mold set up.   I would also guess that the way aluminum dissipates heat didnt help my temp issues. 

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IMG_6758.jpeg

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Hello sir,

That is a nice set of molds you have made. Keeping the mold, the shell and the Babbitt at temperature is indeed very important. I use a fairly large cast iron ladle (drawback: its heavy), this keeps the temperature of the Babbitt long enough stable for pouring. When I did my first pour (longer ago than I want to remember 😁), it really looked terrible, but after a while I got the hang of it. I just kept on trying. The car still runs on that Babbitt bearings.

Good luck with your second pour.

Regards,

Harm

 

Edited by Sloth (see edit history)
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Today, after searching the web, I found a nice detailed picture of a Cadillac con rod. It seems to answer my question about the threaded hole in the Cleveland con rod. To me it looked like an oil hole. See picture below, red arrow point to the oil hole. Gentleman, do I assume this right, that it is an oil hole?

30450936_PicCadConrod2.jpg.d1937bed5fc6084cc2890bbb6b7e2599.jpg

Picture copied from a 1903 "Instruction Book for the Cadillac Automobile"

 

Regarding the counterweights, I could not find another crankshaft from that period, with this bolted on counter weights.

 

Regards,

Harm

 

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It is reasonable, what you suggest, but I wonder why they would thread the hole if it is simply used for rod bearing oiling??  Does it appear that it could have been used as a reference point for some part of the machining process for building the rod when new, then used as an oiling port?

Al

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4 minutes ago, alsfarms said:

It is reasonable, what you suggest, but I wonder why they would thread the hole if it is simply used for rod bearing oiling??  Does it appear that it could have been used as a reference point for some part of the machining process for building the rod when new, then used as an oiling port?

Al

Hello Al,

Thanks, but I really have no idea. Maybe they screwed in some kind of oil scoop? I still have to measure the clearance between the lowest point of the crankshaft and the sump.

Regards,

Harm

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I think it possible that the threading in the hole was to mount it in a machining fixture, something I've done many times - putting in threaded holes or bolts where they will eventually be redundant...

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The famous Cadillac connecting rod with hinge........a BAD idea when new, and one hundred times worse at 110 years old today. I have a rod till last year when I gave it away.......I'll try and get a photo of it from my friend who has it now.

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REO used those hinged rods as well. M 1910 4-cylinder had them. The REO version was even more complicated, with a threaded sleeve the connecting bolt fit into so they could be adjusted. Had I known then what I know now, I'd have replaced them.

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Hello Harm,

If there is no other oil hole present I would assume it is indeed an oil hole. My thoughts on the threads: could it be that at one time the same connecting rod design was used in an earlier open crank design with a grease cup? Later they simply used the same rods by simply omitting the grease cup? If it is the oil hole I would suggest adding a counter sink to it as with most oil holes. In regards to the oil grooves. I have found nothing. However on many horizontal hit & miss engines such as Fairbanks-Morse I have seen spiral grooves that cross at the oil hole. 

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Problem is trying to figure out if anything is missing, modified, and which way the rod faces........up or down? 🤔

 

 

I would spend hours looking everything over........I would assemble the engine without the piston on the rod......and look down the bore to see if anything looks wrong, right, or just plain strange. I think running the engine on a stand extensively is the key. I probably wouldn’t paint or do any cosmetic work.........now, just assemble and run it........get a baseline, tear it apart and inspect everything.......and when satisfied, then I would do a quick reassemble and cosmetic finish.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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My other thought is depending on how the connecting rod big end dips in the oil, they may have had a threaded cup - sort of like the bottom of a grease cup to fill with oil and act as reservoir - replenished at every rotation and feeding the bearing until the rod dipped again. As Ed stated setting it up and observing how it all interacts is key. 

 

The bolt on counter weights I have seen on a marine engine design from 1901.

Edited by Terry Harper (see edit history)
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Hello Terry,

I think that is a real possibility, as there is an oiler just above the rotational returning point of the con rod. So if I keep the hole up (as Cadillac did) and I make some kind of "oil catcher "and screw that into the hole, oil supply is guaranteed. Well, tomorrow I will take some measurements, to proof that this will work as described. One of the pictures I got from Roger Weiss shows an Oiler on top of the engine.

Regards,

Harm

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Hello Harm,

 

Along that line of thought we have a big 4 cylinder T-head marine engine at the museum - there are copper oil pipes arranged so they drip over the main bearings and connecting rods just as you describe. Interestingly it has an oil pump but its only to pump oil back to the reservoir tank which feeds by gravity. The main bearings have what I would call oil boxes cast into the top (each side of the web) to catch the drips from the oil lines. 

Edited by Terry Harper (see edit history)
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Hi Harm,

Back to the babbitt pour.   I decided to bore my first pour attempt to see how deep the inclusions were, and to my surprise the surface cleaned up surprisingly well.  I need to finish at 1.500, currently at 1.475 - so I will finish by reaming bearings in place in block after I finish pouring the second bushing.

My question is - I still have a small inclusion that is getting smaller as I remove material, and there are inclusions at the bottom of the pour. The rest of the bearing surface is clean. (see pictures attached). Would you be comfortable using this bearing from what you see here?  This is the front bearing of two that are separated by about 1.5" gap.

Has anyone ever used a large mag drill as a line boring machine?

Thanks in advance,

 

Mark H

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The critical part of align boring is the boring bar which must be secured at least at both ends and often in the middle in perfect alignment. How it is powered is not as important but my guess is that most drills turn too fast, at least for the finish pass. With only a 1.5" hole to to make, I'd look into a pilot reamer of some sort ... which is how they were likely finished to begin with.

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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Hello Mark,

Looks nice and shiny, well the inclusion, I would be "creative" with the oil grooves😀, I would use it as is. Keeping in mind that the bearing is used for an accessory shaft. I guess that the load is not an impact load as with a crankshaft or con rods. If used for a crankshaft or con rods, I would re-pour it, but not for this application.

Regards,

Harm

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Hello,

Today I spend a lot of time, taking measurements of the position of the con rod in relation to the sump. Well, the idea of yesterday of making some kind of oil catcher will not work. I was mistaken by the position of the drip oiler on the engine, it drips on the wrong side of the con rod. Redirecting the oil, by some kind tubing seems not possible, there is not enough room into the crankcase for it.

I turned the con rod up side down, oil hole to the bottom of the engine. Well, the distance between the oil hole and the sump is just 1 3/8". The con rod also turns into the right direction (clockwise). If I make a small tube with a scoop on the end, with just a 1/8" clearance between the scoop and the sump, it scopes up the oil in the sump, problem solved..... I hope.

Regards,

Harm

 

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I have a car with scoops on the big ends and I wonder if they really scoop oil from the sump or whether the just catch oil splash as the rotate.  When the engine is running at say 1200 RPM the scoops will be dipping into the sump 20 times per second.    As the scoop enters the sump it will displace the oil and it will not have time to recover before the scoop is back.  So the oil will have a channel caused by the rotating big end.  However scoop lubricated big end bearing work so my guess is that it has little to do with the scoop picking up oil as it passes through the sump at normal operating speeds and more to do with collecting oil splash.  Just my 2 cents worth.

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Thanks Harm,

I will plan on using the bearing.  The shaft is driven by the lower timing chain, so there is some axial load on the bearing, but no impact like a crankshaft.  There is an oil inlet hole very close to the small inclusion, so indirectly it will act as an oil groove.  Oil is pressure fed to the front bearing, the accessory shaft has an oil passage drilled diagonally through the shaft to feed oil to the rear bearing.   It looks like Stutz did a good job of providing oil to all bearing surfaces.  I'll press onward.   

Thanks everyone for the advice.

 

Mark H

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  • 3 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

Hello, I got a bit distracted by finishing the rebuild of the Ford model A engine. Took a lot more time and effort than I previously anticipated. For example, the carburetor: I am fond of Tillotson carburetors for the Ford, always driven them with the Tillotson model X and have good experiences with them. Sold my last one to a friend (should not have done that...) As they are a bit rare in the Netherlands, I ordered a "rebuild" one on Ebay. Big mistake, the carburetor looked good (at first glance) but when put on the engine, it leaked petrol like a sieve. Well, disassembled the carb, no gaskets what so ever, main jet broken and so on. Further more, a lot of warping of the upper part. Long story short, I rebuild it, milled out the warping so the upper part fits nicely on the lower body. Removed the stuck main jet part., and so on. O well, just the usual mishaps when restoring an old car.  Crankshaft: original and never polished, showed some slight warping of the flywheel flange, so out with it. And after careful measuring the crankshaft between the centers in the lathe I observed a slight bend at the second main bearing. Took me one day to correct it, not difficult, but putting it under the hydraulic press, and taking it at the lathe again, becomes (after a number of this movements) quite heavy. But after a very light skimming of the flywheel flange, the crankshaft is perfect now with a minimal flywheel wobble (< 0.001").

 

I while ago, I started with learning to use a simple 2D CAD drawing tool for engineers. I bought QCad, the reason is simple, first I tried a free program, but that proved unstable, my frustration and blood pressure ran quite high 🤬. So I looked for another simple (relatively that is) but stable program. After some evenings visiting expert sites and user groups, I have chosen QCad. It got good reviews, is stable and has a very good user manual with a lot of examples and exercises. Most evenings I am busy with self education, because due to Corona, there are no vocational courses available. This old dog is trying to learn new tricks...😉. My ultimate goal is learning 3D-CAD as used by engineers, I tried a free program, but that was a bit to much (very complicated -non intuitive- user interface). So first I have to start with 2D-CAD, just to get the hang of it. I must say I am happy with my progress so far 😊. First serious drawing will be the head gaskets for the Cleveland engine.

 

The Cleveland got -unfortunately- a bit to the background. First thing to do is line boring the main bearings, no reason to postpone that chore any longer.

 

Regards,

Harm

 

Edited by Sloth (see edit history)
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Hello Harm,

 

Learning new tricks is always fun! As I tell my students - the more skills you have the more self reliant you will be and the more you can help others. 

 

I have no experience with QCad. I work extensively with SolidWorks, AutoCAD, Civil 3D, Revit, Infraworks and Fusion 360. However, teaching this stuff to my students I know your struggles. Amazing tools but there can be steep learning curve. Don't let 3D intimidate you. It all based on 2D sketches. The trick is knowing where to start that sketch and what to include and how to set and manipulate planes. When learning, Youtube tutorials are your friend.

 

Have you looked into Fusion 360? Awhile ago they were offering a free version for home and private use but its stripped down compared to the full subscription version.

Also, something to keep in mind - If you are a student most AutoDesk programs are free with a 1 year license. Solidworks is also available to students ($100.00 per year)

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Harm......I recently looked into learning 3d-cad since I had five years of drawing in primary school, and did quite well with it. I'm too old now to learn new tricks...........after a short investagation I determined my old brain can't handle the stress of learning it well. I'm glad you're taking it on. Looking forward to seeing what you do with it. Ed

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Harm and Ed, I managed to get a free copy of the the Fusion 360. with the intention of keeping myself amused and learning, now that I can't 'play' in my workshop anymore. After a week of trying to learn I am sorry to say that I had to give up. Just like Ed I found it too difficult to learn with my old brain. I can see that it is a excellent programme and would have helped me a lot had I learnt CAD earlier. Mike

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Posted (edited)
On 3/10/2021 at 10:32 AM, Mike Macartney said:

Harm and Ed, I managed to get a free copy of the the Fusion 360. with the intention of keeping myself amused and learning, now that I can't 'play' in my workshop anymore. After a week of trying to learn I am sorry to say that I had to give up. Just like Ed I found it too difficult to learn with my old brain. I can see that it is a excellent programme and would have helped me a lot had I learnt CAD earlier. Mike

Hello Mike,

At my former job, my department used AutoCad (2D) for years. A few engineers where quite good with it. But some years ago, we needed to draw our designs more and more 3D. So we changed to Fusion 360.... well, that took quite a while, courses and effort, before they mastered it. But, I must say, the results where marvelous.  A few years ago I gave it a try, and very soon lost the battle 😒.  As I need drawings for the head gaskets and drawings for bell-cranks (to have them water or plasma cut), I think 2D is OK for the near future. Later (when mastering 3D) I hope to make 3D molds for the bell cranks and have them properly cast at the iron foundry.

Regards,

Harm

Edited by Sloth (see edit history)
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6 hours ago, Sloth said:

.... As I need drawings for the head gaskets and drawings for bell-cranks (to have them water or plasma cut), I think 2D is OK for the near future. Later (when mastering 3D) I hope to make 3D molds for the bell cranks and have them properly poured at the iron foundry.

Regards,

Harm

Hello Harm,

 

If you need help with drawings, 3D modeling or 3D printing to get those done let me know and I am more than willing to help. My students and I are always looking for interesting projects.

 

here is the Soldworks model for the lower water manifold for my Wisconsin T-head

 

 

 

1182879372_LowerWaterManifold1.thumb.jpg.4f93e4a7d0671bb8ee49bba64edc10e9.jpg

Some of the 3D printed patterns & Core boxes. Hopefully I can get these cast this year!

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On 3/11/2021 at 12:05 AM, Terry Harper said:

Hello Harm,

 

If you need help with drawings, 3D modeling or 3D printing to get those done let me know and I am more than willing to help. My students and I are always looking for interesting projects.

 

here is the Soldworks model for the lower water manifold for my Wisconsin T-head

 

 

 

1182879372_LowerWaterManifold1.thumb.jpg.4f93e4a7d0671bb8ee49bba64edc10e9.jpg

Some of the 3D printed patterns & Core boxes. Hopefully I can get these cast this year!

IMG_1526.thumb.JPG.ce4932f8a0427e16239d9b55e8a80b14.JPG

 

IMG_1568.thumb.JPG.b50dca207e4f33de001beb85f80fdf65.JPG

 

 

Hello Terry,

Thank you very much for offering your expertise! I am impressed by the quality of the drawing and molds, they look wonderful.

To be honest, one of the many problems with the Cleveland, are the brake drums. This type of drums, I only saw these fitted on a 1903 Mitchell. They did not came with the Cleveland when I bought it. I postponed the manufacturing of them, hoped I would find them some day. But after looking for them during 20 odd years I gave up. So I could make molds of wood (the proven but old fashioned way), instead I am thinking about drawing them in 3D. But, as I am struggling to master a 2D drawing program, 3D is way out of reach for me.

Maybe it is an interesting small project for students? I own a 3D printer (and know how to use it 😉), printing could be a bit slow, but till now Anna and I printed a lot of parts (ThingiVerse). So printing would not be the problem, but 3D drawing 😰😰.

Below are pictures and description of the drums (left and right), copied from a Hayden Eames catalog of 1902.

 

843347628_Brakedrumpicture.thumb.jpg.f3425d94bcaf798ddac20213f5d426d1.jpg

 

 

575378160_Brakedrums1.thumb.jpg.01c1d5fbbc92b17bfebd30894e96884e.jpg

Terry, please let me know if this is something for students to take on. If not, no problem.

Regards,

Harm

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Posted (edited)

Hello,

Today, at last, I completed the drawing of the simplest head gasket of the Cleveland engine. Next in line is the more complex head gasket. The Cleveland has two head gaskets, one for the inlet and exhaust "chamber", and one for the head to the cylinder.

 

1252450916_Rechthoekigekoppakking1024_1.jpg.ad19f1855c6371a29e09d1bdbeff012d.jpg

I am sorry for the quality of the picture, during conversion from DWG to PDF to JPG, it got blurry. I need to investigate to improve that process.

To day I started early, 07:00 hr and managed to get the Ford model A engine running, but oh boy is that engine tight. So after running the engine for 30 minutes at low RPM, I called it a (very short) day. No overheating occurred nor worrying sounds from the bearing department. The remaining part of the day I spend learning QCad.

Regards,

Harm

 

Edited by Sloth (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, Sloth said:

 

Maybe it is an interesting small project for students? I own a 3D printer (and know how to use it 😉), printing could be a bit slow, but till now Anna and I printed a lot of parts (ThingiVerse). So printing would not be the problem, but 3D drawing 😰😰.

Below are pictures and description of the drums (left and right), copied from a Hayden Eames catalog of 1902.

 

Terry, please let me know if this is something for students to take on. If not, no problem.

Regards,

Harm

 

Hello Harm,

We would be glad to take it on. We can working from the Eames drawing to start with and refine it from there. 

On Monday I will forward to you our "Livework" policy and form for you to complete and we can get rolling on it.

 

Best regards,

 

Terry

 

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  • 1 month later...

Hello,

During the last four weeks, Anna and I spend a lot of time with gardening. Also, I build a new green house for Anna (Chinese made kit
). The last green house was a flimsy affair, it was cheap but served its purpose well. So a new, and more sturdy one was ordered. Took me several days to assemble it. Lets say that the assembly manual left a lot to guess about. Original manual was translated from Chinese in to the French language, from there to English and German, and all four where used to come up with a Dutch translation (well, some kind of Dutch 🤣).

 

Cleveland activities:

First of all, I would kindly thank Terry Harper very much for the very nice 3D drawings and STL files, of the brake drums! They are of an outstanding quality and detail. I printed the drums on my 3D printer and they came out perfect. I used a filler/primer, this to get rid of the printing pattern. After that, and after some sanding, I will paint them with 2K paint, and hope, by the beginning of next week deliver them to the foundry to have them cast in grey iron.

 

660090459_Brakedrums.jpg.52d5cced40c61cb84893f415c73b546d.jpg

Brake drums, two different axle diameters. Will need two of each.

 

323396788_3Dprinter.jpg.2888c7dec69288d1fdab72e8076a78bf.jpg

My 3D printer, next investment will be an enclosure for it.

 

1416649020_Printingabrakedrum.jpg.479dea0fc141feb9d14f299ab21f9911.jpg

Printing an brake drum, using PLA.

 

As soon as the drums are painted in glossy yellow, I will publish better pictures.

 

Furthermore, I completed the drawings of the head gaskets and ordered them at "Gasketstogo" in Thailand. Also tried to order piston rings at "Otto engine". I did send two emails, each one a month apart, but I did not get any reaction. Tried to call, but the phone was not answered. So I give up and will look for a different supplier.

Also I am still working on a drawing for the brake bell crank and some small levers, hope to complete it coming weekend.

Regards,

Harm

 

 

 

Edited by Sloth (see edit history)
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I wonder if that PLA has the heat rating to do panic stops ;)

 

On a more serious note... I love that 3D printers are making it much easier to get parts that were once all but unobtainable.  With that in mind, it might make sense to consider getting scans of rare parts during a restoration process such that they be available for future restorers. 

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