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1903 Cleveland Roadster project


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Hello,

After some weeks of no Cleveland progress, today, I continued with the bearing bushings of the Cleveland. The lack of progress was caused by some long over due chores. I replaced all the electric wiring at the work shop and disassembled the engine of my Ford model A for having the cylinders sleeved and have the engine block milled back to standard dimensions.  Luckily all the bearings are fine, all had some shims left, so adjusting them is still possible (if needed).

Today I split the bushings with a thin 0.02" saw cutter, everything went well, each pass about 0.02", easy does it. After that, I fitted the bearing shells into the bearing seats. After compressing the shells into the seats, it turned out that the shells fitted very nicely but sat a bit proud. After some careful filing they are seated correctly now, and are ready for Babbitting. Now its time to make some fixtures for pouring Babbitt, I must say, I am looking forward to it.

 

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Splitting the con rod bushing very slowly, each pass about 0.02" and very slow feed.

 

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The bearing shells fitted into the engine (cylinder half). No oil holes drilled, that will be done after the Babbitting.

 

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The bearing shells fitted into the engine (crankcase half).

 

Regards,

Harm

 

Edited by Sloth (see edit history)
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Harm....the surface of the shells looks too smooth...........check with an old babbitt book..........It's been twenty years since I made shells..........but a rough cut for finish is a requirement for tinning and getting the babbitt to stay in place. Ed

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I think David Greenlees turns a shallow thread on the inside of the shells...but you'd have had to do that before they were split. I'm not sure how you would rough them up now...perhaps add some shallow holes with an end mill. when Babbitt was poured directly into aluminum crankcases (which it won't stick to) it was common to add some holes or even pins to keep the lining in place.

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We made a set of shells for a large early four(1910 50hp) that had none to begin with. Fortunately there was plenty of crankcase to machine and make main shells. It was a LOT of work. The car came out fine, and has thousands of miles on it now. 

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Fantastic work Harm! Glad to see your back at it!

 

Here is a closeup of one of the bronze backed babbitt main bearing inserts from the Wisconsin T-head. Where the babbitt is broken away you can see the really aggressive roughened surface of the shell to provide a mechanical bond. From what I can tell these are factory bearings.

 

As Joe mentioned, some shallow holes would work too.

 

IMG_1138a.thumb.jpg.380a5b61ea4177cf839175b046298486.jpg

Edited by Terry Harper (see edit history)
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Holes offer much less bonding area......the rough threaded surface probably doubles the contact area of the babbitt. Photos taken from The Old Motor site.

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5E614023-6439-4B80-8B90-1B2A0F30CDAD.png

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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20 hours ago, edinmass said:

Harm....the surface of the shells looks too smooth...........check with an old babbitt book..........It's been twenty years since I made shells..........but a rough cut for finish is a requirement for tinning and getting the babbitt to stay in place. Ed

Hello Ed,

Thank you for your remark, you are absolutely right. So I spent today to correct it (see below).

Regards,

Harm

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Hello,

@Jeff, Terry and Joe, thank you very much for your comment.

 

Started very early in the morning, after kicking my self, for forgetting to roughen up the inside of the shells and bushing. After spending some time at the very informative site of  the Old Motor, I decided that threading the bearing shells and bushing is the only way to go. So I spend today to correct the bushing and shells.

This is how I did it: I soldered the shells together on the edges, with tiny solder blobs. Then put the shells into the 4 jaw independent jaw chuck. Centered the shells, and started  threading them, easy does it. That went remarkably well, but it took a lot of time to have them centered and threaded. I used a setting of 12 threads per inch, not going full depth. After completing the threading, and de-soldering the shells, I very carefully removed the solder. Fitted all the shells into the engine bearing seats, everything still fitted nicely 😚 so I am relieved and happy.

 

IMG_0629.jpg.e8a3a8185fc18a7355ee9146a3a669cc.jpg

Threaded bearing shells.

 

IMG_0639.thumb.jpg.7422243d16909c72ca7104684c633d20.jpg

Threaded cushion block bearing.

 

IMG_0643.jpg.98c8821157bcaffda8df3160381b866e.jpg

All shells and the bushing ready for Babbitting.

 

Corona: just watched a press conference of our PM. New stringent measures: a curfew from 20:30pm til 4:30am, starting Saturday January 22 till at least February 9th. Further restrictions: only one guest allowed to visit a "household" and more restrictions on gatherings as funerals etc. The lock-down, as is, will be possibly extended. Further, no traveling from South America, Great Britain and South Africa. On a positive side, the numbers of infections are slowly decreasing. But our government is worrying, that it is going not fast enough to accommodate the people who (possibly) are getting infected with the English variant of the Corona virus.  So they are preparing for a third wave.

 

Regards,

Harm

Edited by Sloth (see edit history)
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Hello Harm,

I absolutely know that you would come up with a remedy to modify the shells in preparation for the babbit process.  I may have missed something, what base material did you make your shells from?  Also, I must have been asleep, I see both main bearing shell sets and also the rod shells, that is the solid bearing tube to be used for?  Keep up the good work!

Al 

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6 minutes ago, alsfarms said:

Hello Harm,

I absolutely know that you would come up with a remedy to modify the shells in preparation for the babbit process.  I may have missed something, what base material did you make your shells from?  Also, I must have been asleep, I see both main bearing shell sets and also the rod shells, that is the solid bearing tube to be used for?  Keep up the good work!

Al 

Hello Al,

Thanks for your trust in me 🙂. The shells and bushing are made of bearing bronze RG-7, very easy to solder. The solid bearing tube is used for the cushion block. The cushion block is mounted on the chassis rails, and functions as a third bearing for the crankshaft. The crankshaft is quite long and slender, and is carrying a heavy load (flywheel 65 Lbs and gearbox 28 Lbs), so it needs a sturdy bearing.

Regards,

Harm

 

PS

Anna and I watched the inauguration of Mr. Biden and Mrs. Harris, very moving!

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The traditional way of making a split bearing is to make the two halves, solder them together to machine them and then split them but I've never seen anyone solder them together after they were machined...good going!

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Today I made the fixture for Babbitting the main bearing shells and the con rod shells. Made the mold of hot rolled steel, and the mandrels (one for the main bearings and one for the con rod bearing which is smaller in diameter) of black tube. I split the tube lengthwise and brazed end pieces and a middle piece into the half tubes. The end pieces are inserted for preventing Babbitt entering the mandrel during the pouring. The middle piece is needed for fixing the mandrel to the mold, using just one fixing screw at the back side.  The fixture for fixing the shell against the mold is the only thing left to make. I hope to pour the Babbitt tomorrow, but first I have to go out for buying a full bottle of oxygen. During the brazing I ran out of it. Problem at the moment is to find a store which is not closed due to the corona measures.

 

IMG_0646.thumb.jpg.6a9463ce6ad116b655c3c17b52445c05.jpg 

The parts for the mandrel.

 

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Mandrel, parts brazed into the half tube, milled flat and fixing hole bored and threaded.

 

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The mold with the two mandrels.

 

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A mock-up of the mold, the mandrels and the shells. The shell fixing will be made to morrow.

 

Regards,

Harm

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Today, I completed the two fixtures needed for Babbitting the bearing shells and cushion block bushing. Not much to report about it.

 

IMG_0650.thumb.jpg.63fd7a71670eae2d4f3505f151d2f2ab.jpg

Fixture for the main bearing shells ( front view).

 

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Fixture for the main bearing shells ( side view).

 

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Fixture for the main bearing shells with shell, ready to pour the Babbitt.

 

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Parts for the fixture needed for Babbitting the bushing for the cushion block.

 

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Assembled the fixture for the bushing, the tube parts is turned one degree taper, this is done to remove the tube more easily after pouring.

 

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The bronze bushing will be fixed by means of Babbitt-Rite. Babbitt-Rite is a clay like high temperature resistant putty. I use it to prevent molten Babbitt to escape through small gaps between the fixture and the shell. After pouring it is still pliable and can be used over and over. Its a replacement  for the Asbestos type of putty. I bought 2 pound of the stuff 25 years ago, and after a lot of use its still all there.

 

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All the bearing parts and fixtures needed for the Cleveland engine bearings.

 

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Made also a shallow tray to collect a possible overflow of molten Babbitt.

 

Today I also managed to buy and collect a full (10ltr) bottle of oxygen,  so I hope to pour the bearings at Monday.

 

Regards,

Harm

 

 

Edited by Sloth (see edit history)
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Looks good! Brings back memories of the Springfield Rolls Royce craftsman teaching me how to pour back in the early 80’s. They were all in their 70’s and 80’s. Great bunch of guys to learn from...........

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Harm,

 

Wonderful work! I can't wait to see the results! At the moment pouring the new bearings for my big Wisconsin T-head is one of the last major challenges. My plan right along  has been to create fixtures similar to yours and David Greenlees. but I have been procrastinating. sometimes I do that! (LOL)

 

Your inspiring me to get going again! 

Edited by Terry Harper (see edit history)
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On ‎1‎/‎20‎/‎2021 at 8:03 AM, Sloth said:

Hello,

@Jeff, Terry and Joe, thank you very much for your comment.

 

Started very early in the morning, after kicking my self, for forgetting to roughen up the inside of the shells and bushing. After spending some time at the very informative site of  the Old Motor, I decided that threading the bearing shells and bushing is the only way to go. So I spend today to correct the bushing and shells.

This is how I did it: I soldered the shells together on the edges, with tiny solder blobs. Then put the shells into the 4 jaw independent jaw chuck. Centered the shells, and started  threading them, easy does it. That went remarkably well, but it took a lot of time to have them centered and threaded. I used a setting of 12 threads per inch, not going full depth. After completing the threading, and de-soldering the shells, I very carefully removed the solder. Fitted all the shells into the engine bearing seats, everything still fitted nicely 😚 so I am relieved and happy.

 

IMG_0629.jpg.e8a3a8185fc18a7355ee9146a3a669cc.jpg

Threaded bearing shells.

 

IMG_0639.thumb.jpg.7422243d16909c72ca7104684c633d20.jpg

Threaded cushion block bearing.

 

IMG_0643.jpg.98c8821157bcaffda8df3160381b866e.jpg

All shells and the bushing ready for Babbitting.

 

Corona: just watched a press conference of our PM. New stringent measures: a curfew from 20:30pm til 4:30am, starting Saturday January 22 till at least February 9th. Further restrictions: only one guest allowed to visit a "household" and more restrictions on gatherings as funerals etc. The lock-down, as is, will be possibly extended. Further, no traveling from South America, Great Britain and South Africa. On a positive side, the numbers of infections are slowly decreasing. But our government is worrying, that it is going not fast enough to accommodate the people who (possibly) are getting infected with the English variant of the Corona virus.  So they are preparing for a third wave.

 

Regards,

Harm

 

In parts of Canada things are even more restricted. No non essential travel, to work and back and to stores for essential purchases. But most places are at about the same stage of restriction as you are . Here in British Columbia we are slightly more relaxed than much of Canada. No Curfew but a very strong advisory to limit activity to essential only. No checkpoints { yet }.

 

Your bearing shells are looking great !

 

Greg

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Harm,

   Just a quick note to say I really appreciate the work that you are doing on this project. With your photography and explanations of your processes I am learning a LOT. Most of what you are doing is way beyond my skill set but nevertheless it is good to understand the work that restorers  have to go through to achieve the end result. Take utmost care, be safe and keep up the great work!

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Harm,

Keep feeding us a daily dose of interesting information about pouring bearings.  I thought that process was above my skill set.  I am rethinking that thought.

Regards,

Alan

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On 1/24/2021 at 1:19 PM, edinmass said:

Harm, how hot do you heat your fixture before pouring? Do you use an electric heat source or a torch? 

Hello Ed,

I heat the fixture by torch, as the pouring and forced cooling of the base of the fixture is done by a plant sprayer its quite a messy affair. Pictures in next post.

Regards,

Harm

Edited by Sloth (see edit history)
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Today I went for pouring the bearing shells and bushing. First thing to do, tinning the shells and bushing. I use flux (S39 new formula not so aggressive as the S39 of the past) and as for the tinning I use bearing material chips. For heating I use a simple map gas torch, overheating is nearly impossible with it. The Babbitt chips where left over from the Babbitting of the Flanders20 bearings. I think using the same material for tinning is better than tinning with solder. After careful cleaning the shells and bushing with a solution of water and ammonia (stinky stuff), I left them dry on and electric stove around 180 F (82C), the temperature is not critical, just to make sure no water is left. For measuring the temperature, I use a Flir electronic thermometer.

Now I heated the Babbitt on the gas stove, using an special ladle, with a bottom feeder. That means that the dross will stay into the ladle and I have clean Babbitt from the bottom of the ladle for pouring. I bought this ladle 10 years ago at an Ebay shop. Now it is the time to put the shell into the fixture and close all the gaps between the fixture and the shell with Babbitt Rite.

After the Babbitt is simmering at about 790F (420C) this is critical, be careful here: to hot and it oxidizes very fast, too low and it will not flow into the cavity between the fixture and the shell and, so it will not bond to the shell either. In between I heated, with the torch, the fixture and the shell till 430F (230C), that is the melting temperature of the Babbitt. Now the easy part: taking the hot ladle off the stove and pour the Babbitt into the cavity between the shell and the fixture (some overflow happens). After some extra heating with the torch, I let it cool down for a minute or so, and than spray some water mist on the base plate of the fixture. This forced cooling is done to be sure that no large crystals, but only nice small crystals are formed. After 5 minutes the Babbitt has solidified and the shell can be removed from the fixture. Today I managed Babbitting 6 shells and one bushing. Two shells failed, probably the shell and Babbitt were to cold, so it will re-pour them tomorrow. When the shells are removed from the fixture, they look really terrible. But after cleaning and a first pass at the mill (line boring) one can see the quality (or lack thereof 😒).

 

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Box with Babbitt chips.

 

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Tinned shell before cleaning with water/ammonia solution

 

IMG_0683.thumb.jpg.443f4b2176139519135bf898caa67a7d.jpg

Flir, electronic temperature gauge, functions remarkably well. Much easier to use than a thermocouple.

 

IMG_0681.jpg.d9d020864e4534cb8af8df86c1414686.jpg

Ladle with bottom feeder.

 

IMG_0680.jpg.eff5c6278ade4ab2bee141a410f71e41.jpg

Set up of Babbitting tools and fixture.

 

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Ready for putting some Babbitt Rite on and after that pouring the Babbitt.

 

IMG_0673.thumb.jpg.6898ecafb2f3152ea9cad940ae2fd08e.jpg

Connecting rod bearing shell, this is a good one.

 

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Main bearing shell, looks not so nice but in reality is a good one.

 

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Main bearing shell, this is a really bad one. Shifted during the pouring, and the shell was not hot enough, to be re-done tomorrow.

 

One of the great things about Babbitting bearings by my self, is the fact that I can do it over and over again. So if it went wrong, nothing is lost. One of the Flanders main bearings (long bushing 4") I poured 3 times before I was satisfied. Did it 6 years ago, and after a lot of miles they are still as new (inspected them a few month ago). Line boring gives me much more trouble, when that goes wrong one has to start all over again.

Regards,

Harm

 

 

Edited by Sloth (see edit history)
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Hello Harm,

This is certainly proof and evidence that we can do work of restoration if we put down some effort.  I had new babbit installed on the bottom end of an 8 cylinder Marmon several years ago.  The job done professionally was OK, nearly marginal and I was surprised that the shop didn't re-pour one of the bearings.  One bearing had what looked like bubble holes in the babbit.  What would cause that?  Too hot or moisture?

Al

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Pouring is as much an art as it is a science. On the 1903 car it’s more forgiving than later stuff with multiple bearings.........a 9 main bearing crank is a lot of work.......and then getting it bored straight and the crank installed properly can take countless hours to get perfect. The most complicated engines can be insane. The 29 Stearns Knight I have been working on has 52 of them, so I am told.........hell, it’s got 24 connecting rods! Harm has this well under control...........and I give him credit for posting the first try...........I don’t think I could have done has as good as he has..........and I think it’s fair to expect to have to take several tries for each half with an in home shop set up. I’m certain he will get it right........and perfect. It’s all just time and persistence. I was always frustrated when I got bearings poured well......and then screwed them up machining them. None of this is anywhere as easy as it seems......and it’s dangerous at the same time. He is only the third person I have ever seen attempt to pour his own bearings..........three thumbs up for his talent and craftsmanship! 👍👍👍
 

The metal I poured years ago, we heated the mold to 450 degrees by placing it on an electric stove top.......and then shut it off. Just as it began to cool to 445-440 we would pour the material. The gentleman who taught me insisted on absolutely no talking while the process was going on.........no distractions were tolerated when tinning or pouring. After two shells were done, a smoke and coffee were required. It took a long time to do the Rolls PIII engines. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Harm, I'd advise caution in relying too heavily on the infrared thermometer.  They are not really designed to measure the temperature of shiny metals, which have low emissivity.  A thermocouple sensor for foundry use can be dipped in the molten metal to check temperature more accurately.  Your comments in your post indicated you probably have a thermocouple probe and readout.

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Most excellent Harm!

 

With my own babbitt bearing project looming in the near future, I am really excited to see your setup and outcome. In regards to the temp of the form and mandrel. I believe David Greenlees uses a thermometer that that is inserted in a hole drilled in the mandrel. However, I think his mandrel was solid? Again, than you for sharing!

 

 

Edited by Terry Harper (see edit history)
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15 hours ago, Gary_Ash said:

Harm, I'd advise caution in relying too heavily on the infrared thermometer.  They are not really designed to measure the temperature of shiny metals, which have low emissivity.  A thermocouple sensor for foundry use can be dipped in the molten metal to check temperature more accurately.  Your comments in your post indicated you probably have a thermocouple probe and readout.

Hello Gary,

Thank you for your warning. I am aware of the pitfalls using the infrared thermometer, but using the black inner side of the ladle I get a stable temperature reading. For the molten Babbitt in the ladle, usually I use a themocouple. But as I broke it last summer, and promptly forgot to order a replacement, I have to rely on the infrared thermometer.

Regards,

Harm

Edited by Sloth (see edit history)
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Started very early in the morning, cleaning the ladle and used fresh Babbitt. I started Babbitting the remaining shells, they came out very nice and shiny. This got me worrying, why are the shells I poured yesterday much more dull. Long story short, I cleaned the shells I poured yesterday and started all over again. I did not mix the "old" Babbitt with the fresh Babbitt. After pouring, all of the shells came out nice and shiny. I am satisfied now. Probably something wrong with the "old" Babbitt? I don't know.

@Al, bubbles are mostly caused by moisture. Cleanliness and slow heating before pouring of the shells to get rid of moisture is of utmost importance, also slow heating of the fixture is important. You will be amazed how much moisture will show on the surface of the fixture when you heat it.

 

IMG_0686.jpg.3933f4bb6392fec967b8beb9a947eb89.jpg

All the shells are done, on the picture they look a bit dull. In reality they are more shiny.

 

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This shell is ready to be poured, the green stuff is the Babbitt Rite.

 

Next job will be the removal of excess Babbitt of the bushing and the shells.

 

This afternoon I collected my Ford model A engine block. It is sleeved and milled back to standard size pistons. Coming weeks I must overhaul the distributor, oil pump, water pump and start motor, also new valves etc. Its nice that one can buy so many spare parts for it. For most of the  cars I restored, no spare parts were available, I had to make them my self. I must admit that this is one of the attractions for me. But economically speaking its a disaster, so I do understand very well, why some cars never got professionally restored. Technically  there is not so much of a problem, but when speaking of money and economics, no way! Speaking about the Cleveland, I know very well, I will never get the money back that I sunk in it. Luckily I have a very understanding wife 🥰 who likes what I do.

Regards,

Harm

 

 

Edited by Sloth (see edit history)
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I suspect the earlier pour was either overheated, or more likely suffered from oxidation. The entire job looks good!👍

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Wow Harm, this is the first time I have ever seen the process carried out. At one time, in the UK, in my youth, there were many companies doing this sort of work. Presumably, nowadays these companies are few and far between? I have really enjoyed reading your excellent descriptions of the work you have been carrying out and the great photographs that accompany the text. Mike

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks Harm for all of the info on your babbitt pour.  I am hopefully going to give it a try this weekend.   My project is  re-babbitting the two bronze bearings for the accessory shaft on a 1929 Stutz.   I plan on using an electric heat treating oven to preheat the mold which I have made out of aluminum.   The heat treating oven is programmable so keeping the mold at the proper temperature will not be a problem.   I have a 1000 degree stick type thermometer which I plan to use on the molten babbitt material.    I will take some pictures of my set up and first attempt.   Wish me luck!

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On 2/9/2021 at 8:20 PM, mdh7475 said:

Thanks Harm for all of the info on your babbitt pour.  I am hopefully going to give it a try this weekend.   My project is  re-babbitting the two bronze bearings for the accessory shaft on a 1929 Stutz.   I plan on using an electric heat treating oven to preheat the mold which I have made out of aluminum.   The heat treating oven is programmable so keeping the mold at the proper temperature will not be a problem.   I have a 1000 degree stick type thermometer which I plan to use on the molten babbitt material.    I will take some pictures of my set up and first attempt.   Wish me luck!

Hello Sir,

Good to read you will give it a try. Just one tip, be careful with the aluminum mold. Make sure that the Babbitt will not stick to it, when I pored the Flanders20 bearings, I learned that the hard way. To remedy this, I put soot on the mold (trick I learned out of an old book about pouring bearings). I guess there are other releasing agents, but I used some soot from the shop stove.

Good luck with the poring!

Regards,

Harm

Edited by Sloth (see edit history)
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Thanks Harm,

I have read articles and have seen videos where people have used the "soot" off of acetylene torch flames, or another release agent used was graphite.   I think I might try both.  If the babbitt sticks to my center post I am in real danger of destroying my bronze shell trying to push it out.

I have really enjoyed following your progress on your car.   I am a definite amateur at this game starting on a car that should have been out of my comfort zone - but at 63 years old to start in the hobby you might as well go for the gusto !!  

I think the most important things I have learned so far are to study as much as possible before trying whatever you need to do (which has been much easier due to the vast knowledge of people on this site that are willing to help),  listen to the advice from people that have already done what you are trying to do,  and not be so worried about screwing up that you dont do anything.  I'm in the hobby to learn, and the learning part has been very rewarding.  Hopefully I will end up with a car that I can be proud of.

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19 hours ago, Sloth said:

Hello Sir,

Good to read you will give it a try. Just one tip, be careful with the aluminum mold. Make sure that the Babbitt will not stick to it, when I pored the Flander20 bearings, I learned that the hard way. To remedy this, I put soot on the mold (trick I learned out of an old book about pouring bearings). I guess there are other releasing agents, but I used some soot from the shop stove.

Good luck with the poring!

Regards,

Harm

 

 

When I was taught to pour white metal (English term) by the Springfield Rolls Royce Works factory employees, using soot as a release agent was all they would. use. They turned a torch up to make maximum soot and apply it with the tip. It's the only way I have ever done it. Simple, and cost effective. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Hello,

The last week of January I spend at completing the Ford model A engine. I rebuild the distributor, oil pump, water pump and starter motor, also new valves etc. Went well, until I put in the adjustable valve lifters. They are impossible to adjust easily, the problem is that the square on the lifter body falls below the lifter guide (with the valve in closed position), so it is impossible to put a spanner on it.  Luckily, a lot has been written about it, so I do "What the Romans did" and follow the advises given .

 

Last Friday and Saturday I cleaned the Babbitt bearing of the connecting rod of the Cleveland engine and bored and scraped it at a 0.0015" play. I used PlastiGauge to see if the play I measured was real. It was, so I am happy about it. Only thing left: putting oil channels in.

 

Gentlemen here I have a question: as I have no experience with horizontal engines, where in the bearing shells should I locate them??

 

I must say I could not find any reference on the internet to it. I just have one picture of it, for some reason the other pictures (I made a lot of them) just will not leave my IPhone...

 

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Ready for boring, micrometer for making sure everything stays straight as the clamping nut is tightened.

 

After boring and fitting on the crankshaft, I measured it again for straightness and if the piston pin is parallel to the crankshaft. Did it by using a steel shaft (very straight) and a machine level. Everything is fine, the crankshaft and the piston pin are parallel and the con rod is not twisted (measured it with 4 positions of the crankshaft) and against the table of the milling machine. Will try to get the other pictures off my IPhone...

 

The last few days, I did not much at the shop. It is really too cold. Last Saturday (the 6th of Feb.) a cold wind started to blow from the North East. Saturday night the wind speed increased to a  storm including snowfall (some kind of a Blizzard), which is very rare for our country (sea climate). Monday the  country came to a stand still and no traveling was possible. So how about that for enforcing the Covid lock down 😁. Long story short, Tuesday early in the morning it stopped snowing. The temperature dropped to 17 F, coming night Friday/Saturday it will drop to about 6 F. We are not used to this kind of weather.... So that is the reason I do not go to the shop, the shop stove can not keep up with this kind of weather (and neither can I). Below are some pictures of our farm and neighborhood. The last time this kind of weather appeared, was during the winter of 2009/2010. Removing the snow from our driveway was not difficult. Weeks before I put the front loader on the small tractor and used it to shovel most of the snow. But as could be expected I got very cold....  so this time the "seat time" was not very pleasant.

 

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Picture I took this afternoon, sunny but windy again.

 

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Anna shoveling snow and clearing the doors of the shed so I can get the tractor out..... Stupid me stored the tractor inside, it now stays outside (advice of my better half 😙 ).

 

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Sunday afternoon, just 30".  Monday afternoon 45".

 

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Snow all over the place. All ditches are filled with snow, one should be careful to walk there.

 

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Looks a bit desolate..... the wind is still blowing (Monday morning the 8th of Feb.)

 

The weather forecast predicts: thaw will set in after the weekend.

Regards,

Harm

Edited by Sloth (see edit history)
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Hello Harm,

I can appreciate what snow does to change the appearance of the countryside.  Nice pictures.  How much snow did your receive before Mother Nature blessed you with some wind to pile it up in drifts?

Regards,

Al

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