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1953 Pontiac V8 prototype


Winesnob
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I have a 53 Catalina 2 door hardtop.  Inline 8 and hydramatic transmission.  Even though it show low mileage it has quite a lot of blowby and smokes from the tailpipe more than I think it should.  Given the cost of a rebuild and not wanting to build a hot rod I have sourced a 55 Pontiac sedan with a newly rebuilt 287 V8 automatic. 

Hoping to do a transplant as I understand that Pontiac had about 23 prototypes of this.

I expect someone else has done this already and am looking for some insight and tips on how to complete my project.

Also converting to 12 volt at the same time.

F100C5A9-0141-4538-B6F8-3DC8B9FF2ABB.jpeg

D7B85387-B2FF-4435-ABD2-7CC46F38DF21.jpeg

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9 hours ago, Winesnob said:

I have a 53 Catalina 2 door hardtop.  Inline 8 and hydramatic transmission.  Even though it show low mileage it has quite a lot of blowby and smokes from the tailpipe more than I think it should.  Given the cost of a rebuild and not wanting to build a hot rod I have sourced a 55 Pontiac sedan with a newly rebuilt 287 V8 automatic. 

Hoping to do a transplant as I understand that Pontiac had about 23 prototypes of this.

I expect someone else has done this already and am looking for some insight and tips on how to complete my project.

Also converting to 12 volt at the same time.

F100C5A9-0141-4538-B6F8-3DC8B9FF2ABB.jpeg

D7B85387-B2FF-4435-ABD2-7CC46F38DF21.jpeg

 

Even though I am not enthusiastic about turning a nice car into a modified car, There is a fellow who comes on to the site who has done that very same thing to his 53 Pontiac. Actually he started with a 1955,  287, but now I understand he has put a 1959 389 engine in his car. As you may or may not know 1955-58 Pontiac engines had mountings on the bellhousing and at the front of the timing cover, and 1959 Pontiac changed all that by casting in mounting of the engine on the side of the block making the layout two mounts on the side of the engine and one at the rear of the transmission.

 This fellow also wanted to add air conditioning. As you already know the 1954 Pontiac is very much like a 53 and the 54 Pontiac was not only the first year for factory A/C, but the 54 Pontiac with help of Harrison Division of G.M. was the first car to integrate the A/C system to be all under the hood and dash and was the guinea pig for the testing of the unit for ALL G.M. cars to come. So this fellow used parts for the A/C from a 54 Pontiac  and adapted it to his 53.

The fellow Pontiac enthusiast name is Charles Coker and I'm sure you can find him in the member roster, if not Charles is the Tech advisor for the 53-54 Pontiac in the POCI Club. 

 

BTW on the picture on your engine I see: There are two side valve cover plates one for four cylinders and the other for the rear four cylinders. The rear cover has the provision for the road draft tube. The picture of your engine I see the rear cover plate on the front. This is where the road draft tube/cover plate assy. belong for proper drafting of engine blowby gasses.

This is where it goes;

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Edited by Pfeil (see edit history)
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Thank you for the info regarding the draft tube.  It was this way when I purchased the car.

i have also reached out to Charles Coker and have been able to speak with him.  He is exceptionally well versed and insightful regarding anything related to 53 and 54 Pontiacs.

i will be staying in touch with him as we proceed with our project.

 

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For what it's worth, your current engine may not be worn out. These engines are a 1933 design, and normally use more oil than a modern car. Pontiac was building cars intended to last 100,000 miles when a typical Chevrolet might have 2 or 3 minor overhauls in that time. Pontiacs had really hard blocks, (and also oiled the cylinders maybe a little more than other cars if you believe the shop manual, in the interest of long life). I would correct the position of the draft tube, and make sure that the breather cap is clean and open. Non-functional crankcase ventilation tends to increase oil burning.

 

Another thing, your carburetor looks like it may have not had attention in a long time. I would make sure that it is not running too rich, as even a little bit rich will increase blue smoke a lot. I don't mean the black smoke that occurs when the engine runs extremely rich, I mean blue oil smoke. You could check that the choke opens all the way, and maybe shut it down immediately after a highway run and look at the spark plugs. Fuzzy dry sooty black indicates probably too much gas.

 

Good luck with your project, whatever you do.

 

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, Bloo said:

For what it's worth, your current engine may not be worn out. These engines are a 1933 design, and normally use more oil than a modern car. Pontiac was building cars intended to last 100,000 miles when a typical Chevrolet might have 2 or 3 minor overhauls in that time. Pontiacs had really hard blocks, (and also oiled the cylinders maybe a little more than other cars if you believe the shop manual, in the interest of long life). I would correct the position of the draft tube, and make sure that the breather cap is clean and open. Non-functional crankcase ventilation tends to increase oil burning.

 

Another thing, your carburetor looks like it may have not had attention in a long time. I would make sure that it is not running too rich, as even a little bit rich will increase blue smoke a lot. I don't mean the black smoke that occurs when the engine runs extremely rich, I mean blue oil smoke. You could check that the choke opens all the way, and maybe shut it down immediately after a highway run and look at the spark plugs. Fuzzy dry sooty black indicates probably too much gas.

 

Good luck with your project, whatever you do.

 

And don't forget that heat riser on the exhaust manifold to the bottom of the intake. make sure it's free and is working properly.

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